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Current Articles & Research Resources, June 21

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Explore housing and homeownership trends. (Joint Center for Housing Studies, June 2018)
  • Review the definitions of "rural" in the Texas statutes and rules. (Texas Legislative Council, June 2018)
  • Consider the economic aspects of groundwater in Texas. (Texas Water Journal, May 21, 2018)
  • Explore sheriffs' fees by county. (Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, accessed June 21, 2018)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Solar energy: On the solarcoaster." Economist, June 16th-22nd, 2018, pp. 53-55.
    Examines whether the global solar (photovoltaic) industry can survive without subsidies.
  • "Voting: Multiple choice." Economist, June 16th-22nd, 2018, pp. 21-22.
    Discusses Maine's first statewide election using ranked-choice voting [RCV], where voters rank the entire field by preference, from first to last, rather than voting for a single candidate. Considers the pros and cons of RCV elections.
  • "Ready for shooter? Some school police say no." By Evie Blad. Education Week, June 6, 2018, pp. 1, 11-13.
    Discusses results of national survey conducted of school resource officers by Education Week Research Center. Reports on how prepared these officers feel they are for active-shooter situations in schools. Mentions Governor Greg Abbott. Report at: https://www.edweek.org/media/school-resource-officer-survey-copyright-education-week.pdf
  • "Schools see new dilemma in teens who cyberbully themselves." By Sasha Jones. Education Week, May 30, 2018, p. 18.
    Addresses digital self-harm in schools, a new form of expression that some students are using to cope with emotional pain and self-hatred. Discusses the difficulty school officials are having assisting students who are cyberbullying themselves.
  • "Frequent emergency department users: A statewide comparison before and after Affordable Care Act implementation." By Shannon McConville, et al. Health Affairs, June 2018, pp. 881-889.
    Reports that the likelihood of being a frequent emergency department [ED] user decreased in the two years following implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Notes that the largest predictors of frequent ED use included having a diagnosis of a mental health condition or a substance use disorder.
  • "Texas residents’ views on state and national health policy priorities." By Liz Hamel, et al. Internet Resource, June 2018, pp. 1-16.
    Reports that according to a 2018 Texas Health Policy Survey, over half of Texans wanted the state legislature to increase spending on health care programs, and two-thirds of Texans said the state should expand its Medicaid program and better ensure that low-income adults can get the health care they need.
  • "The ethics of Medicaid's work requirements and other personal responsibility policies." By Harald Schmidt and Allison K. Hoffman. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), June 12, 2018, pp. 2265-2266.
    Recommends safeguards the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services should put in place for states implementing work requirements, to ensure they are prioritizing protecting health over political goals.
  • "Vital signs: Trends in state suicide rates — United States, 1999–2016 and circumstances contributing to suicide — 27 states, 2015." By Deborah M. Stone, et al. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), June 8, 2018, pp. 1-8.
    Reports that during 1999-2016, suicide rates increased in nearly every state. Includes a map that indicates Texas' rate increased in the 19 to 30 percent range.
  • "Finished water: Zero-discharge treatment plant converts brackish wastewater to extend Texas drinking water supply." Opflow, May 2018, p. 40.
    Highlights the El Paso Full Recovery Desalination Plant.
  • "Multiservice utilities: A one-stop shop for communities." Public Power, May-June 2018, pp. 28, 30-32.
    Explores benefits and challenges to public power utilities that are multiservice providers for their communities.
  • "How to (legally) make your own off-the-books handgun." By Mark McDaniel. Reason, July 2018, pp. 47-52.
    Discusses the considerations the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives uses in determining whether specific gun parts fall under the definition of a firearm. Provides instructions for assembling a Glock 17 handgun and suggests debates over gun control that focus on commercial manufacture may be futile when considering such homemade weapons.
  • "Federal bill would limit opioid scrips for acute pain." By Joey Berlin. Texas Medicine, June 2018, pp. 42-44.
    Discusses proposed three-day limit on opioid prescriptions for acute pain that is part of United States Senate Bill 2456, also known as the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) 2.0. Includes opinions from pain doctors on the measure.
  • "Rate case scheduling rule adopted." Texas Public Power, May 2018, p. 4.
    Provides an update on a rule the Public Utilities Commission of Texas adopted at their April 12 meeting. Related information at: http://www.puc.texas.gov/agency/rulesnlaws/subrules/electric/25.247/47545adt.pdf
  • "System benefit repeal." Texas Public Power, May 2018, pp. 4-5.
    Reports that the Public Utilities Commission of Texas approved a proposal repealing and amending rules regarding the System Benefit Fund, which was previously eliminated by the Legislature. Related information at: https://www.puc.texas.gov/industry/projects/electric/47343/47343adt.pdf

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Interim Hearings – Week of June 25

Today's Committee Meetings on the LRL website is a calendar of interim committee hearings with links to agendas. Below are resources related to upcoming Interim Hearings.

June 25

House Committee on Criminal Jurisprudence

Charge: Penal laws, "red flag" or mental health protective orders for firearms (school safety)

Charge: Current statutes designed to protect minors from accessing firearms without proper supervision; safe firearm storage

 

June 26

House Select Committee on Opioids & Substance Abuse

Charge: Impact of overdose reporting defense laws known as "Good Samaritan" laws

Charge: How opioids and substance abuse have impacted the normal scope of work for law enforcement, first responders, and hospital emergency department personnel

 

June 27

Appropriations Charge 18/General Investigating & Ethics Charge 10: Monitor agencies and programs under the Committee's jurisdiction and implementation of legislation:

Oversight of the Texas Health & Human Services Commission's management of Medicaid managed care contracts

 

House Committee on Public Education

Charge: Effectiveness of schools' current multi-hazard emergency operation plans, violence prevention strategies

Charge: Current school facilities and grounds, research-based 'best practices' to provide a more secure environment

 

June 28

House Committees on Defense & Veterans' Affairs and Homeland Security & Public Safety (9:00 A.M., Joint Hearing)

Charge: Experience of other states in prioritizing retired peace officers and military veterans for school security

 

House Committee on Homeland Security & Public Safety (15 minutes after adjournment of 9:00 A.M. Joint Hearing)

Charge: Options to increase the number of school marshals available, and current statutory requirements that limit utilization of the program

 

House Committees on Public Education and Public Health (9:00 A.M., Joint Hearing)

Charge: Mental health services for children, strategies to enhance overall school safety

 

House Committee on Public Health (1:00 P.M.)

Charge: Population health and health care delivery in rural and urban medically underserved areas, role of telemedicine, rural hospital closures

New & Noteworthy List: June 2018

The Library is continually adding new books to its collection. Below are the six titles from our June 2018 New & Noteworthy list

 

Check out and delivery of New & Noteworthy titles is available to legislative staff in Capitol and District offices. To arrange check out and delivery of any of these items, you can submit an online request through the New & Noteworthy page on our website, contact the library at 512-463-1252, or use our PDF request form.

 

1. The ABCs of School Choice
By EdChoice
Presents comprehensive, data-rich information on private school choice programs in the United States. Focuses on education savings accounts (ESAs), vouchers, tax-credit scholarships, and individual tax credits and deductions. Outlines how each program works and who it serves. Provides feedback on how each program could be improved.
EdChoice, 2018. 162 pages.
Online at: https://www.edchoice.org/research/the-abcs-of-school-choice/
379.111 AB29 2018


 

 

2. America's Lone Star Constitution: How Supreme Court Cases from Texas Shape the Nation
By Lucas A. Power
Charts the development of Texas-inspired constitutional law, illustrating why Texas provides such breadth and depth to constitutional adjudication. Details Texas cases that cover major issues of national interest, areas as diverse as race, school finance, abortion, freedom of religion, and the relationship of the states and the federal government. Comments on how individual Supreme Court justices voted on the Texas cases, splitting justices into liberal, conservative, and centrist points of view.
University of California Press, 2018. 310 pages.
342.73 P871A 2018


 

 

3. Discrimination and Disparities
By Thomas Sowell
Challenges the notion that economic and social disparities can be the result of any one factor, such as discrimination, exploitation, or genetics. Argues that policy solutions are often counterproductive because they are based on oversimplified data and fallacies of reasoning.
Basic Books, 2018. 179 pages.
339.2 SO92D 2018


 

 

4. Speaker Jim Wright: Power, Scandal, and the Birth of Modern Politics
By J. Brooks Flippen
Examines the life and political career of Jim Wright, beginning in the Texas House of Representatives and culminating as Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives. Draws on personal papers and interviews with Wright and others. Suggests his political downfall was brought about by poor personal choices, a dictatorial leadership style, and the "devolution of political civility" that is even more prevalent today.
University of Texas Press, 2018. 400.
328.73 F648S 2018


 

 

5. The Texas Liberators: Veteran Narratives from World War II
By Aliza S. Wong, ed.
Documents Texas veterans' experiences as liberators of concentration camp prisoners during World War II. Notes that this collection of stories was made possible by the Texas Holocaust and Genocide Commission, which was established by SB 482, 81st Legislature R.S., a bill authored by Senators Florence Shapiro and Rodney Ellis, to "teach the lessons of the Holocaust and other contemporary genocides."
Texas Tech University Press, 2018. 109 pages.
940.54 W846T 2018


 

 

6. Mexican American Baseball in South Texas
By Richard A. Santillan, et al.
Highlights the contributions of baseball teams and players from Edinburg, McAllen, Mission, Pharr, Donna, Alamo, San Juan, Brownsville, Harlingen, and other surrounding communities, from the late 19th century through the 1950s. Discusses the role of baseball in bridging the cultural divide in the Rio Grande Valley. Includes the story of former Representative Joe J. Bernal and his father.
Arcadia Publishing, 2016. 127 pages.
796.35709764 SM 2016

Current Articles & Research Resources, June 14

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Explore health system performance in Texas. (The Commonwealth Fund, ©2018)
  • Examine human trafficking laws and support systems for survivors. (National Conference of State Legislatures, May 31, 2018)
  • Read about electronic storage detection dogs. (CNET, June 11, 2018)
  • Track drought conditions in Texas. (Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, June 2018)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Defendant's choice." By Lorelei Laird. ABA Journal: The Lawyer's Magazine, June 2018, pp. 18-19.
    Highlights the results of Comal County's experiment to let indigent clients choose their own court-approved lawyer instead of using the traditional "wheel" system in which the next lawyer on the list is appointed.
  • "Assessing the House opioid package's Medicaid bills: While some advance access to treatment, one raises serious concerns." By Anna Bailey, et al. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, June 11, 2018, pp. 1-7.
    Summarizes several bills in the United States House of Representatives that would address the opioid epidemic. Discusses potential changes to Medicaid that could improve substance use disorder provider capacity and reduce insurance coverage gaps.
  • "Medicine: From A&E to AI." Economist, June 9th-15th, 2018, pp. 68-69.
    Reports on several projects that aim to use artificial intelligence to improve diagnoses and the speed and precision of medical treatments.
  • "Santa Fe shooting sparks debate on school design." By Evie Blad. Education Week, May 30, 2018, p. 13.
    Discusses the design of architecturally safer schools in light of the recent shooting at Santa Fe High School. Addresses both unobtrusive safety measures and aggressive physical security measures. Mentions Lt. Governor Dan Patrick.
  • "Interpreting the complexities of the cooperative 'fix.'" Ethanol Today, May/June 2018, pp. 16-17.
    Examines the change to Section 199A in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017. Related information at: https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/1/text.
  • "How to prepare your office for an active shooter." By Jackie Ford. Houston Business Journal, June 7, 2018, p. 18.
    Outlines several steps employers can take to reduce the likelihood of workplace violence.
  • "As overdoses climb, emergency departments begin treating opioid use disorder." By Rita Rubin. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), June 5, 2018, pp. 2158-2160.
    Reports on the increase in hospital emergency departments that are undergoing the federally required training to dispense buprenorphine, a drug used to treat opioid use disorder. Explains that without this training, emergency departments could not initiate medication-assisted addiction treatment.
  • "Incarcerated immigrants in 2016: Their numbers, demographics, and countries of origin." By Alex Nowrasteh and Michelangelo Landgrave. Policy Brief (CATO Institute), June 4, 2018, pp. 1-8.
    Finds that immigrants — legal and illegal — are less likely to be incarcerated than native-born Americans. Points out that illegal and legal immigrants who immigrate at a younger age — ages 0 to 17 — are more likely to be incarcerated as adults.
  • "When your community wants renewables: Making changes, meeting demand." By John Egan. Public Power, May-June 2018, pp. 37-41.
    Highlights ways that public power utilities are improving customers' access to renewable power. Includes examples, such as the Georgetown Utility Systems in Georgetown, Texas.
  • "Scientists aim to smoke out wildfire impacts." By Warren Cornwall. Science, June 1, 2018, pp. 948-949.
    Discusses how researchers plan to study wildfire smoke plumes during the summer in the western United States.
  • "Teacher pay is a problem." By Michelle Exstrom. State Legislatures, June 2018, pp. 22-23.
    Considers recent efforts by state legislatures to address teacher salaries and teacher turnover. Notes the percentage of teachers in each state who hold second jobs.
  • "Children with autism left behind by low Medicaid rates." By Michael Ollove. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), June 12, 2018, pp. 1-6.
    Highlights two class action federal lawsuits that may open a new and effective strategy to challenge low Medicaid reimbursement rates, which have a substantial impact on children's access to medically necessary and legally required treatment.
  • "Swat team." By Sean Price. Texas Medicine, June 2018, pp. 20-25.
    Explains the need for better education of and by physicians on vector-borne illnesses (diseases that are spread by bugs). Notes that vector-borne illnesses often are misdiagnosed and are underreported. Cites HB2055, 84th Legislature, and HB3576 and SB570, 85th Legislature, R.S., that addressed these problems (and notes setbacks with funding and vetoes).
  • "Pension fund health relies on employer contributions." By Max Patterson. TEXPERS Pension Observer, Vol. 2 2018, pp. 5, 7.
    Highlights a recent Texas Public Policy Foundation panel on public pension reform, which included Representative Dan Flynn and Senator Royce West.
  • "This man wants to be on birth control." By Alexandra Sifferlin. Time, June 18, 2018, pp. 38-43.
    Discusses recent research being conducted on new hormonal and non-hormonal contraceptive methods for men.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Interim Hearings – Week of June 18

Today's Committee Meetings on the LRL website is a calendar of interim committee hearings with links to agendas. Below are resources related to upcoming Interim Hearings.

 

June 20

House Committee on Human Services

Charge 2: Overview of Medicaid managed care, recent information reported by the Dallas Morning News regarding Medicaid managed care and the Health and Human Services Commission

Updated: Members Not Returning, 86th Legislature

In January, we compiled a list of members not returning to the 86th Texas Legislature. An updated list that includes the results of the recent primary runoffs is provided below. 21 members of the Texas House and 2 members of the Texas Senate will not return in 2019. To see a full list of members of the 85th Texas Legislature (2017), please go here. Note that regardless of election outcomes, all of these legislators will keep their respective seats until January 2019, unless they resign earlier.

 

Table: Members not returning to the 86th Texas Legislature

Rep. Roberto Alonzo Defeated in Democratic primary election, 3/6/2018
Rep. Diana Arévalo Defeated in Democratic primary election, 3/6/2018
Rep. Cindy Burkett Defeated in Republican primary election for Texas Senate, 3/6/2018
Rep. Byron Cook Retiring
Rep. Scott Cosper Defeated in Republican primary runoff election, 5/22/2018
Rep. Dawnna Dukes Defeated in Democratic primary election, 3/6/2018
Sen. Craig Estes Defeated in Republican primary election, 3/6/2018
Rep. Wayne Faircloth Defeated in Republican primary election, 3/6/2018
Rep. Pat Fallon Won Republican primary for Texas Senate, 3/6/2018
Rep. Helen Giddings Retiring
Rep. Larry Gonzales Resigned effective 6/7/2018
Rep. Lance Gooden Won Republican primary runoff for U.S. House of Representatives, 5/22/2018
Rep. Jason Isaac Defeated in Republican primary election for U.S. House of Representatives, 3/6/2018
Rep. Mark Keough Won Republican primary election for Montgomery County judge, 3/6/2018
Rep. Jodie Laubenberg Retiring
Rep. René Oliveira Defeated in Democratic primary runoff election, 5/22/2018
Rep. Larry Phillips Resigned effective 4/30/2018
Rep. Kevin Roberts Defeated in Republican primary runoff election for U.S. House of Representatives, 5/22/2018
Rep. Leighton Schubert Resigned effective 2/4/2018
Rep. Joe Straus Retiring
Sen. Van Taylor Won Republican primary election for U.S. House of Representatives, 3/6/2018
Rep. Tomas Uresti Defeated in Democratic primary election, 3/6/2018
Rep. Jason Villalba Defeated in Republican primary election, 3/6/2018

 

 

Current Articles & Research Resources, June 7

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Examine the current and projected financial status of social security. (Social Security Administration, June 5, 2018)
  • Consider whether pets have a positive impact on people's health. (NIH MedlinePlus, Spring 2018)
  • Read about the Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission decision. (National Conference of State Legislatures, June 4, 2018)
  • Track an increase in federal criminal prosecutions for illegal border crossings. (Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse, Syracuse University, June 4, 2018)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Uncompensated care costs fell in nearly every state as ACA's major coverage provisions took effect." By Jessica Schubel and Matt Broaddus. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, May 23, 2018, pp. 1-9.
    Explains Medicaid expansion has helped lower uncompensated health care costs, benefiting patients, hospitals, and state budgets, and warns of the effect of proposed Medicaid work requirements. Charts uncompensated care costs and medically uninsured rates in the 50 states from 2013 to 2015.
  • "A state multi-sector framework for supporting children and youth with special health care needs." Child Trends, May 2018, pp. 1-26 (Note Length).
    Describes a four-part state framework for supporting children and youth with special health care needs from birth through age 17, including health, family support, education and employment, and law enforcement and juvenile justice.
  • "The future of tech startups: Into the danger zone." Economist, June 2nd-8th, 2018, pp. 55-57.
    Reports how the dominance of technology giants such as Amazon, Facebook, and Google has had a meaningful effect on entrepreneurial innovation, as the bigger firms can quickly launch competing services that put startups out of business.
  • "Justice: Data detectives." Economist Technology Quarterly, June 2nd, 2018, pp. 3-12.
    Examines the promise and dangers of new technologies that are transforming the way criminal justice systems operate, including street-level surveillance, electronic monitoring, and predictive policing and sentencing.
  • "Rural districts take a 24 percent hit in Algebra II enrollment." By Hector Bojorquez. IDRA Newsletter (Intercultural Development Research Association), May 2018, pp. 3-4.
    Discusses the findings of the IDRA Ready Texas Study, which examined the early effects of the new graduation requirements imposed by HB5, 83rd Legislature, Regular Session.
  • "State & local tax contributions of young undocumented immigrants." By Misha Hill and Meg Wiehe. Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, Updated April 2018, pp. 1-18.
    Examines state and local tax contributions of undocumented immigrants currently enrolled or eligible for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.
  • "The neurobiology of opioid addiction and the potential for prevention strategies." By Gary Peltz and Thomas C. Südhof. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), May 22/29, 2018, pp. 2071-2072.
    Calls for a public health prevention strategy to address the opioid crisis, rather than the current focus on the later stages of drug addiction.
  • "Focusing the lens on film credits." By Brett Johnson and Bruce Kessler. Journal of MultiState Taxation and Incentives, June 2018, pp. 33-35.
    Summarizes recent developments in film incentives programs in Louisiana, New York, California, and Georgia, including eligibility requirements and benefits, credit monetization, and state oversight.
  • "AARP in the states: Texas." National Institute on Retirement Security, April 2018, pp. 1-8.
    Presents infographic fact sheets on the Employees Retirement System of Texas and Teacher Retirement System of Texas, and highlights the economic impact of Texas public pensions.
  • "The teaching moment." By Rivka Galchen. New Yorker, June 4 & 11, 2018, pp. 38-43.
    Highlights the recent teacher walkout in Oklahoma and the failed attempt at winning legislative approval for additional education funding. Explains this failure has provoked people to get involved in local politics and to run for office.
  • "Abolish ICE." By Shikha Dalmia. Reason, July 2018, pp. 10-11.
    Reviews the history of deportation efforts back to the Clinton administration and the creation of Immigration and Customs Enforcement [ICE] after 9/11. Argues that ICE and the deportation program should be abolished and the true hardcore criminals from other countries should be handled through regular law enforcement procedures.
  • "Speaking out: Four Price, State Representative, District 87." Texas Builder, May/June 2018, pp. 22-25.
    Interviews State Representative Four Price about the skilled labor shortage in Texas, workforce and job training programs, water and road infrastructure, and the state budget process.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Interim Hearings – Week of June 11

Today's Committee Meetings on the LRL website is a calendar of interim committee hearings with links to agendas. Below are resources related to upcoming Interim Hearings.

 

June 11

Senate Select Committee on Violence in Schools & School Security

Charge: Infrastructure and design of Texas schools to reduce security threats, proposals to harden school facilities, including limiting access points, improving screening and detecting of weapons, retrofitting school facilities with improved locks, emergency alarm systems, and monitoring cameras

 

June 12

Senate Select Committee on Violence in Schools & School Security

Charge: School security options and resources, including, but not limited to, the school marshal program, school police officers, armed school personnel, the Texas School Safety Center, and other training programs

Resource Highlight: House Standing Committee Minutes Before 1973

House and Senate committee minutes are a valuable resource for understanding the work that goes into crafting legislation. House standing committee minutes in the Legislative Reference Library collection from before 1973 have been scanned and are available in the LRL's committee minutes database

 

Scanned minutes, particularly from earlier sessions, may also include other committee documentation, including agendas, exhibits, hearing notices, press releases, rules, testimony, transcripts, and vote sheets. For example:

The LRL database also allows users access to committee documents from House, Senate, and Joint committees, 63rd–77th Legislatures (1973–2001), as well as to search for minutes from the 78th–85th Legislatures that are available through Texas Legislature Online.

 

The digitization of the Senate standing committee minutes prior to 1973 is in process.

 

Image: On April 9, 1969, several leaders from the Baylor College of Medicine, including Dr. Michael E. DeBakey, testified before the House and Senate's respective State Affairs committees, offering possible solutions for the state's physician shortage.

Current Articles & Research Resources, May 31

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Consider ways to combat elder financial exploitation. (National Conference of State Legislatures, May 2018)
  • Explore similarities and differences among rural, suburban, and urban areas. (Pew Research Center, May 22, 2018)
  • See how many Texas cities are among the fastest-growing cities in the U.S. (U.S. Census Bureau, May 24, 2018)
  • Read about a federal ruling that could affect elected officials on social media. (Electronic Frontier Foundation, May 23, 2018)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "This little house could be a big deal for Austin." By Marissa Luck. Austin Business Journal, May 25, 2018, pp. 5-8.
    Considers the viability of a proposed 3-D home printing model and the impact on cities lacking affordable housing.
  • "Growing revenue: The economics of marijuana legalization." By Lisa McKinney. Capitol Ideas, March/April 2018, pp. 28-31.
    Suggests the tax revenue generated by marijuana legalization may not be the "golden goose" to solve state budget problems, despite marijuana being an estimated $10 billion industry in 2017. Discusses challenges faced by Colorado, Oregon, and Maine in the legalization and regulation process.
  • "States' complex Medicaid waivers will create costly bureaucracy and harm eligible beneficiaries." By Jennifer Wagner and Judith Solomon. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, May 23, 2018, pp. 1-16.
    Criticizes Medicaid eligibility restrictions such as increased work requirements, new premium requirements, and coverage "lockouts" in Medicaid demonstration projects, or section 1115 waivers, as proposed by several states listed in the appendix.
  • "Taking the hill." By Ann Scott Tyson. Christian Science Monitor, May 28, 2018, pp. 24-30.
    Acknowledges the nearly 400 veterans running for Congress as a promising political initiative that might help bridge the partisan divide and bolster confidence in Congress. Includes quotes from Texas state Senator Van Taylor, who is running to represent Texas' Third Congressional District.
  • "After a Texas college revoked scholarships for 61 Nepali students: 'Admissions hunger games'." By Eric Hoover. Chronicle of Higher Education, May 25, 2018, pp. A25-A27.
    Highlights the experiences of some of the 61 Nepali students who had scholarships rescinded by the University of Texas at Tyler. Focuses on their efforts to find acceptance at other institutions.
  • "Hack-proof." By Henry Kenyon. CQ Weekly, May 21, 2018, pp. 30-33.
    Investigates adopting blockchain technology as a means of protecting government records from hacking. Reports there are federal and state agencies already experimenting with using blockchain applications to combat their cybersecurity problems.
  • "Area's increasing income gap threatens region." By Bill Hethcock. Dallas Business Journal, May 18, 2018, pp. 20-25.
    Examines the widening gaps in wealth, educational attainment, access to housing, and other challenges connected to increasing population growth in the Dallas-Fort Worth region.
  • "Increasing naloxone awareness and use: The role of health care practitioners." By Jerome M. Adams. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), May 22/29, 2018, pp. 2073-2074.
    Notes the significance of the Surgeon General's Advisory on Naloxone and Opioid Overdose, which explains the need to educate the public and develop policies on this medication that can reduce opioid overdose mortality.
  • "Texas showdown: Insurgent populists are facing off against establishment picks in May's high-stakes runoff." By D.D. Guttenplan. Nation, June 4/11, 2018, pp. 12-18.
    Profiles several Democratic candidates for Texas congressional districts.
  • "Conservation: Drought and supply limits drive sustainability initiatives." Opflow, March 2018, pp. 10-14.
    Discusses California American Water's recent experiences to provide some valuable lessons on how one water utility is dealing with extreme climate conditions.
  • "Bordernomics: Enhancing prosperity by increasing integration in the US-Mexico border region." By M. Ray Perryman. Perryman Report and Texas Letter, Vol. 35, No. 3, pp. 1-3, 6-7.
    Presents part two of a special report describing the results of a study on the trade and economic activity between the United States and Mexico.
  • "Engage diverse stakeholders to strengthen policy." By Elizabeth Leisy Stosich and Soung Bae. Phi Delta Kappan, May 2018, pp. 8-12.
    Highlights the experiences of California, Iowa, New Hampshire, and Vermont in bringing diverse stakeholders into the process when developing school reform.
  • "First look at 2017 CO2 emission trends in U.S.: Electricity sector focus." By Daniel Klein. Public Utilities Fortnightly, May 2018, pp. 40-47.
    Analyzes two key energy-related carbon dioxide emission trends in the United States, as reported in the U.S. Energy Information Agency's March 2018 Monthly Energy Review. Report at: https://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/archive/00351803.pdf
  • "'Assault weapons,' explained." By Jacob Sullum. Reason, June 2018, pp. 52-57.
    Explains that "assault weapons" account for a small percentage of firearms used in mass shootings and other gun violence. Discusses the difficulty in meaningfully defining an "assault weapon" and whether a ban would have a measurable impact on safety.
  • "Critical condition: Fall funding." By W. Scott Bailey. San Antonio Business Journal, May 18, 2018, pp. 14-16.
    Focuses on San Antonio as a recipient of grants from the National Institutes of Health [NIH]. Explains how NIH grants can be used to lure top talent and spur economic growth in Texas.
  • "Rebirth on campus." By Maya Rhodan. Time, June 4, 2018, pp. 58-61.
    Examines recent student activism on historically black college and university campuses. Attributes this activism to a number of factors, including the current White House administration.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

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