LRL Home - Points of Interest

Current Articles & Research Resources, June 27

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Find out how to avoid phone calls from fake phone numbers. (Federal Trade Commission, June 25, 2019)
  • Track language usage in American case law over time, from the colonial period to today. (ABA Journal, June 20, 2019)
  • Read about Disaster City of Texas A&M University, where first responders train. (Stateline, June 25, 2019)
  • Explore an FAQ related to the upcoming November 5, 2019 uniform election. (Texas Secretary of State, accessed June 26, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Do states adjust Medicaid enrollment in response to capitation rates? Evidence from the Medicare Part D clawback." By Laura Quinby and Gal Wettstein. Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, June 2019, pp. 1-32.
    Examines to what extent more generous capitated federal subsidies would likely cause states to increase Medicaid enrollment. Includes state table of Modified FMAP [Federal Medical Assistance Percentage] Accounting for State and Federal Spending on Prescription Drugs for Dual-Eligibles, 2012.
  • "Rethinking mental health for cops: When 'good intentions' aren't enough." By Henry Gass. Christian Science Monitor, June 17, 2019, pp. 12-13.
    Highlights programs such as the critical incident stress management program [CISM] of the Fort Worth Police Department that assist officers who have been involved in traumatic incidents. Suggests an array of options for psychological first aid should be available to first responders.
  • "Teacher appreciation days." CQ Weekly, June 3, 2019, pp. 35-37.
    Examines other states' legislative efforts to raise teacher pay or create a minimum salary. Highlights legislation in Arizona, Arkansas, Idaho, Louisiana, and Oklahoma.
  • "Religion and freedom: I can do no other." Economist, June 15th-21st, 2019, pp. 21-22.
    Reports on the case of Scott Warren, who is facing felony charges for conspiring to harbor and transport illegal immigrants. Examines whether the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993 can protect Mr. Warren from prosecution, as he claims a spiritual motive lay behind the actions he took to reduce the number of migrants who perish in the Arizona desert.
  • "The financial benefits and burdens of performance funding in higher education." By Lori Prince Hagood. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, June 2019, pp. 189-213.
    Investigates the effects of performance funding policies on state appropriations for four-year, public universities. Establishes state funding patterns associated with performance funding and determines to what extent performance funding favors some institutions over others.
  • "Home health care providers struggle with state laws and Medicare rules as demand rises." By Susan Jaffe. Health Affairs, June 2019, pp. 981-986.
    Considers how Medicare rules and state laws restricting nurse practitioners' scope-of-practice have raised obstacles to patients' access to home health care.
  • "The rural hospital problem." By Austin B. Frakt. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), June 18, 2019, pp. 2271-2272.
    Examines reasons for increased numbers of rural hospital closures, and considers the consequences for cost, quality, and access.
  • "Free speech, if we can keep it." By Charles C.W. Cooke. National Review, June 24, 2019, pp. 34-36.
    Contrasts strong support for free speech doctrines in the courts with a shrinking "meaningful culture of free speech" due to concerns about hate speech and intolerant speech.
  • "Injunction dysfunction." By David French. National Review, June 24, 2019, pp. 33-34.
    Examines the increasing use of nationwide injunctions by activists across the political spectrum. Argues that the proper legal mechanism for action affecting all similarly situated individuals would be a class-action lawsuit.
  • "Economic benefits of the Texas energy sector." By M. Ray Perryman. Perryman Report and Texas Letter, Vol. 36, No. 4, pp. 1-3, 6.
    Quantifies the stimulus the energy sector provides across the economy. Points out the varied industries required to meet the needs of the growing Texas oil and gas industry.
  • "Lessons from California on carbon risk: First climate-change bankruptcy." By Priti Patel, et al. Public Utilities Fortnightly, June 1, 2019, pp. 80-83, 87.
    Examines how the takings clause of California's state constitution is applied to hold public utilities liable for any damages caused by their systems.
  • "What constitutes 'discrimination' in college admissions?" By Dennis L. Weisman. Regulation (CATO Institute), Summer 2019, pp. 24-27.
    Contends that defining discrimination exclusively in terms of a departure from merit-based admissions may be too narrow. Points out this definition fails to account for the value conferred on the university by other types of admissions, such as those based on legacy and athletic preferences.
  • "Teens of 'anti-vaxxers' can get their own vaccines, some states say." By Michael Ollove. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), June 24, 2019, pp. 1-5.
    Examines the rights of adolescents to make certain health care decisions. Points out recent state legislative efforts to narrow school vaccination exemptions and to give minors the right to get vaccinated without their parents' permission.
  • "The vaccine battlegrounds." By Jefferey Kluger. Time, June 24, 2019, pp. 38-43.
    Discusses vaccine-related legislation recently addressed in state legislatures. Considers oppositional efforts against state legislation requiring vaccinations, despite a record number of measles cases in the United States.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

 

New & Noteworthy: June 2019

The Library is continually adding new books to its collection. Below are the five titles from our June 2019 New & Noteworthy list

Check out and delivery of New & Noteworthy titles is available to legislative staff in Capitol and District offices. To arrange check out and delivery of any of these items, you can submit an online request through the New & Noteworthy page on our website, contact the library at 512-463-1252, or use our PDF request form.

 

1. Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration
By Emily Bazelon
Argues that prosecutors have unchecked power that is a major contributing factor to mass incarceration in the United States. Presents the issue in a compelling manner through the experiences of two young people who were caught up in the criminal justice system. Describes how reform within district attorneys' offices and changes to state laws could address the overuse of incarceration.
Random House, 2019. 409 pages.
345.73 B347C 2019


 

 

2. Economics of Higher Education in the United States
By Thomas Adam and A. Burcu Bayram, editors
Analyzes the changing economic environment of higher education and reviews the historical roots of the student debt crisis. Claims today's focus on college tuition and student loans derived from a fundamental shift in the historically-defined purpose for a college education – what was once perceived as a public good, normally free to the user, developed into an environment in which higher education became a privilege, determined by financial wealth and market forces. Suggests prohibitive higher education costs could hamper states' efforts to create the skilled workforce key to states' economic growth and necessary to meet employers' needs.
Texas A&M University Press, 2019. 209 pages.
378.3 AD14E 2019


 

 

3. The Meanest Man in Congress: Jack Brooks and the Making of an American Century
By Timothy McNulty and Brendan McNulty
Profiles former Congressman and Texas Representative Jack Brooks, a Democrat who served in the 50th and 51st Texas legislatures and the U.S. House of Representatives from 1953 through 1995. Describes his life, from his upbringing in Beaumont and enlistment in World War II to his political career under ten U.S. presidents. Highlights Brooks' influence as a member of the Texas congressional delegation, his leadership roles on congressional committees and subcommittees, his insistence on government oversight, and his successes in passing bipartisan legislation. Describes his candid manner and demanding methods which earned him the (mostly complimentary) reputation of being the "Meanest Man in Congress." Details his roles in advancing LBJ's Great Society, the impeachment of Nixon, and investigating the Iran-Contra Affair.
NewSouth Books, 2019. 509 pages.
328.73092 M235M 2019


 

 

4. The River and the Wall
By Ben Masters
Chronicles the ambitious trip of three Texans along the U.S.-Mexico border from El Paso to the Gulf of Mexico. Illustrates border issues through photography, firsthand experiences, environmental features of the Big Bend and the Rio Grande, and interviews with landowners, immigrants, and U.S. Representatives Will Hurd and Beto O'Rourke.
Texas A&M University Press, 2019. 188 pages.
917.64 M393R 2019


 

 

5. Summary of Conference Committee Report for House Bill 1: Appropriations for the 2020-21 Biennium
By Legislative Budget Board
Presents an overview of the conference committee report for HB 1, 86th Legislature. Details the total appropriations for the 2020–21 biennium by each method of finance for each article in the bill. Provides a comparison point between the different versions of the bill as it progressed through budget deliberations, enabling readers to identify the differences between chamber bills, or a specific chamber’s changes.
Legislative Budget Board, 2019. 77 pages.
Online at: http://www.lbb.state.tx.us/Documents/Appropriations_Bills/86/Conference_Bills/5872_S12_Bill_Summary.pdf
L1300.8 B859 202021SC

Locating Bill Effective Dates on TLO

The library reviews the text of all bills that become law to determine their effective dates and enters the information into Texas Legislature Online (TLO). To find the effective date of a bill, look up the bill in TLO and check the "Last action" field in the history window. In some cases, different sections of a bill may have different effective dates, in which case additional remarks will be given to provide the information.

 

For House and Senate bills from the 86th Regular Session (2019), the two largest groupings are:

  • Effective immediately: 473
  • Effective on 9/1/19: 820

The library compiles a more detailed list of bills and their effective dates following each regular and called session. The list is made available on the library's website once it is complete.

Current Articles & Research Resources, June 20

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Examine ways to address prescription drug pricing policy. (The Heritage Foundation, June 7, 2019)
  • Consider whether your tax information is secure. (U.S. Government Accountability Office, June 11, 2019)
  • See how Americans are accessing the internet. (Pew Research Center, June 13, 2019)
  • Explore how telehealth can reach patients in rural and underserved areas. (National Conference of State Legislatures, May 30, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "New psychiatric hospital seen as key to boosting care, saving money." By Will Anderson. Austin Business Journal, June 7, 2019, pp. 12-13.
    Highlights SB2111, 86th Legislature, relating to the redevelopment of the Austin State Hospital campus, a key step to improving mental health treatment. Includes comment by Senator Kirk Watson.
  • "SNAP caseload and spending declines have accelerated in recent years." By Dorothy Rosenbaum and Brynne Keith-Jennings. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, June 6, 2019, pp. 1-20.
    Examines the decline in participation and spending in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program [SNAP], formerly food stamps, and possible contributing reasons factors of the improving economy and the three-month time limit on SNAP participation by childless adults without disabilities. Includes table of SNAP caseload changes by state, showing Texas with a 9.3 percent decrease in average monthly SNAP participants from 2013-2018.
  • "Supporting older youth beyond age 18: Examining data and trends in extended foster care." By Rachel Rosenberg and Samuel Abbott. Child Trends, June 2019, pp. 1-16.
    Analyzes the effect of extended foster care, when youth stay in care past age 18 with additional services and supports, on important young adult outcomes, including high school graduation/GED, employment, school enrollment, homelessness, and young parenthood. Finds permanency rates are largely stable in states that have implemented extended foster care.
  • "As abortion battles intensify in states, misperceptions abound." By Samantha Laine Perfas and Jessica Mendoza. Christian Science Monitor, June 3, 2019, pp. 14-15.
    Considers the abortion issue in terms of facts, context, and political rhetoric.
  • "Alternative energy — castles in the sky?" Economist, June 8th-14th, 2019, pp. 71-72.
    Points out a new approach to generating electricity from the wind without the use of wind turbines.
  • "America First trade policy." Economist, June 8th-14th, 2019, pp. 65-66.
    Points out how the Trump administration's trade policies are challenging the multilateral trade system. Discusses the consequences of weaponizing tariffs to effect change in other countries' trade policies.
  • "Charting the continued friction between K-12 spending, equity." By Alex Harwin and Sterling C. Lloyd. Education Week, June 5, 2019, pp. 10-12.
    Analyzes federal data to grade how well states are doing with K-12 spending and the equitable distribution of school funds. Reports Texas received a grade of D+ on this year's Quality Counts school finance report card.
  • "Maximizing job creation bang-for-buck by reducing import leakages." By Josh Bivens. EPI Policy Memorandum, June 13, 2019, pp. 1-11.
    Finds that ambitious investment in infrastructure and reducing the United States trade deficit that allows jobs to "leak" outside the economy will create thousands of additional manufacturing jobs in the United States, putting American manufacturing production on a more level playing field with global competitors.
  • "How accurate are net price calculators?" By Laura Perna and Jeremy Wright-Kim. Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education, May/June 2019, pp. 8-9.
    Finds that some net price calculators on college and university websites are difficult to locate, work inconsistently, and present information in ways that may mislead students and families on the expected cost of attendance.
  • "School counselors express concerns about college and career advising in Texas." By Hector Bojorquez. IDRA Newsletter (Intercultural Development Research Association), May 2019, pp. 1-2, 4.
    Reports on preliminary findings from a study of how counselors view their roles, including the effects of the endorsement system of college or career pathways set up by 2013 legislation in Texas.
  • "The Permian's demographics." By Paula Dittrick. Oil and Gas Journal, June 3, 2019, p. 14.
    Summarizes the Texas Independent Producers and Royalty Owners Association's [TIPRO] 2019 Permian Basin Report, which looks at trends in the labor force, education, and population in a 61-county area known as the Permian Basin region.
  • "Oh deer." By Tate Watkins. Reason, July 2019, pp. 33-35.
    Reviews the history of wildlife management in the United States. Considers how developing a legal market for venison could control the deer population, similar to the Texas program that allows harvesting of wild hogs.
  • "Education: Unlocking access." By Bennett G. Boggs and Lesley Kennedy. State Legislatures, May/June 2019, pp. 6-11.
    Examines whether free college policies — known as promise programs — are making the grade. Points out six criteria successful promise programs should pursue.
  • "A disappointing end to eminent domain reform efforts." By Russell Boening. Texas Agriculture, June 7, 2019, p. 2.
    Discusses SB421, 86th Legislature, relating to eminent domain reform in Texas, which stalled during the Texas Farm Bureau's attempts at compromising with the state's oil and gas industry. Mentions HB991, 86th Legislature.
  • "Who counts?" By Eric Benson. Texas Monthly, June 2019, pp. 54-60.
    Discusses the 2020 census and efforts to ensure a complete count, especially in Hidalgo County. Examines the effect a citizenship question could have on participation and the repercussions of an undercount for Texas. Mentions Representative Cesar Blanco.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Bill Statistics after Signing/Veto Period, 86th Legislature

Sunday, June 16 was the last day the Governor could sign, veto, or allow to become law without his signature bills presented to him less than 10 days (not counting Sundays) prior to final adjournment of the 86th Regular Session.

 

The following bill statistics were calculated on June 17 at 1 p.m.

  • To see how these statistics have changed since last week, please view our blog post from June 12 and June 10.
  • To learn about session law chapter numbers and copies of signed bills, please view our blog post from June 5.

 

House and Senate Bills
Filed 7,324
Sent to the Governor 1,429
Signed by the Governor 1,229
Vetoed by the Governor 56
Filed without the Governor's signature 144
House and Senate Joint Resolutions
Filed 217
Filed with the Secretary of State 10
House and Senate Concurrent Resolutions
Filed 254
Filed with the Secretary of State 29
Sent to the Governor 96
Signed by the Governor 94
Vetoed by the Governor 2
Filed without the Governor's signature 0

 

Current Articles & Research Resources, June 13

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Consider Americans' viewpoints on misinformation. (Pew Research Center, June 5, 2019)
  • Find signed copies of bills via the Secretary of State's website. (Texas Secretary of State, accessed June 12, 2019)
  • Explore legislation state by state related to consumer data privacy. (National Conference of State Legislatures, June 7, 2019)
  • Read about how toll charges vary among drivers from in state and out of state. (Stateline, June 7, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Less than 'zero tolerance.'" By Lorelei Laird. ABA Journal: The Lawyer's Magazine, June 2019, pp. 16-18.
    Examines whether federal drug crime prosecutions are taking a back seat to misdemeanor unlawful entry prosecutions required under the zero tolerance policy for immigrants who cross the border without authorization.
  • "Winners and losers at the Capitol." By Kimberly Reeves. Austin Business Journal, June 7, 2019, pp. 20-21.
    Picks groups that benefitted the most or lost out in the 86th Legislature.
  • "The impact of imposing sales taxes on business inputs." By Andrew Phillips and Muath Ibaid. Council on State Taxation, May 2019, pp. 1-27 (Note Length).
    Analyzes state sales taxation of business purchases and negative implications for overall state tax policy, including pyramiding, lack of transparency, and competitiveness. Discusses the previous failure of broad-based sales tax reform efforts to exempt business inputs in Louisiana, Minnesota, Ohio, and Nebraska. Includes state tables on the estimated business share of state and local taxes.
  • "Climate change and the Midwest: Soaked and less sceptical." Economist, June 1st-7th, 2019, pp. 21-22.
    Explains how floods and storms are revising inland America's attitude to climate change.
  • "School funding: Testing time." Economist, June 8th-14th, 2019, p. 29.
    Examines the effects of public school budget cuts during the Great Recession on pupils' test scores. Related information at: https://www.cbpp.org/sites/default/files/atoms/files/11-29-17sfp.pdf.
  • "86th Texas Legislature." By Cassandra Pollock. Fort Worth Business Press, June 3-9, 2019, pp. 14-15.
    Examines the performance of Dennis Bonnen as Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives during the regular session of the 86th Legislature. Includes quotes from both Democratic and Republican members of the House.
  • "Updated opportunity zone rules ease investor concerns." By Jeff Jeffrey. Houston Business Journal, May 23, 2019, pp. 26-27.
    Reports on the recent Department of the Treasury's guidance on IRS rules for opportunity zones that may ease investors' concerns while also spurring economic development.
  • "Ten tips for policymakers for improving probation." By Marc Levin. Internet Resource, May 2019, pp. 1-12.
    Discusses probation as an alternative to incarceration and provides ten tips to increase its effectiveness, fairness, and efficiency. Mentions SB1055, 82nd Legislature.
  • "Toward equality of educational opportunity: What's most promising?" By Arthur E. Wise. Phi Delta Kappan, May 2019, pp.8-13.
    Reviews three reform strategies that have been employed to provide broader access to high-quality teaching and education resources. Explains improvements in teacher professionalism and quality offers more promise than equity lawsuits or renewed standards and accountability.
  • "Foster care crisis opens doors to second-chance parents." By Teresa Wiltz. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), June 5, 2019, pp. 1-6.
    Reports several states have enacted or proposed laws making it easier for parents to reinstate their parental rights after they have been terminated. Notes critics' concerns that returning kids to unfit parents will jeopardize their safety.
  • "What's killing Texans?" By Sean Price. Texas Medicine, June 2019, pp. 22-29.
    Explains Texas' system for investigating deaths and completing death certificates. Notes HB3716, 86th Legislature, which potentially lowers the number of medical examiner offices in Texas. Calls for greater physician education on why completing death certificates correctly is vital to collecting accurate death statistics.
  • "The price of oil." By Christian Wallace. Texas Monthly, June 2019, pp. 76-80, 145-157.
    Profiles the effects of the oil industry on residents of the Permian Basin. Discusses how the current boom has increased the cost of living and negatively impacted education and roads in the region. Mentions Rep. Brooks Landgraf.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Updated Bill Statistics, June 12

June 16 is the last day the Governor can sign, veto, or allow to become law without his signature bills presented to him less than 10 days (not counting Sundays) prior to final adjournment of the 86th Regular Session.

The following bill statistics were calculated on June 12 at 1 p.m. The Governor continues to be hard at work reviewing bills, so the signing numbers are growing! To see how these statistics have changed and other post-session information, see previous blog posts on the legislative process.

 

86th Legislature Statistics

 

House and Senate Bills
Filed 7,324
Sent to the Governor 1,429
Signed by the Governor 862
Vetoed by the Governor 7
Filed without the Governor's signature 80
House and Senate Joint Resolutions
Filed 217
Filed with the Secretary of State 10
House and Senate Concurrent Resolutions
Filed 254
Filed with the Secretary of State 29
Sent to the Governor 96
Signed by the Governor 85
Vetoed by the Governor 0

 

Bill Statistics, Two Weeks After Sine Die, June 10

June 16 is the last day the Governor can sign, veto, or allow to become law without his signature bills presented to him less than 10 days (not counting Sundays) prior to final adjournment of the 86th Regular Session.

 

The following bill statistics were calculated on June 10 at 1:45 p.m. To see how these statistics have changed and other post-session information, see previous blog posts on the legislative process.

 

 

86th Legislature Statistics

House and Senate Bills
Filed 7,324
Sent to the Governor 1,429
Signed by the Governor 484
Vetoed by the Governor 7
Filed without the Governor's signature 45
House and Senate Joint Resolutions
Filed 217
Filed with the Secretary of State 10
House and Senate Concurrent Resolutions
Filed 254
Filed with the Secretary of State 29
Sent to the Governor 96
Signed by the Governor 79
Vetoed by the Governor 0

 

Current Articles & Research Resources, June 6

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Read about how the federal government is addressing concerns about privacy related to face recognition technologies. (Government Accountability Office, June 4, 2019)
  • Find the latest reports produced by the Texas Health & Human Services Commission. (Texas Health & Human Services, accessed June 5, 2019)
  • Prepare for hurricane season. (Texas Department of Public Safety, May 31, 2019)
  • See legislation related to occupational licensing. (Texas Department of Licensing & Regulation, accessed June 5, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Beyond us and them: The role of trust in vaccine controversy." By Amanda Paulson. Christian Science Monitor, May 27, 2019, pp. 10-11.
    Argues the vaccination controversy is not a scientific problem but a social problem created by lack of faith in government, the health-care system, and pharmaceutical companies.
  • "Child-safe internet: The kids aren't alright." Economist, May 25th-31st, 2019, p. 66.
    Reports members of the United States Congress are drafting multiple bills to regulate how internet and social media platforms treat children — the internet equivalent of the Children's Television Act of 1990.
  • "The Texas Legislature wraps up: Hide your crazy." Economist, June 1st-7th, 2019, p. 24.
    Summarizes the 86th Texas Legislature, calling it the most productive legislative session in a decade.
  • "Bound to win." By Jill Lepore. New Yorker, May 20, 2019, pp. 76-82.
    Reviews the evolution of political memoirs or autobiographies, focusing on books by current presidential candidates.
  • "Report: Industry appeal to investors at all-time low." Oil and Gas Journal, May 6, 2019, pp. 31-33.
    Summarizes a series of articles from Deloitte, "Decoding the O & G Downturn," which explores the oil and gas industry's struggles with uncertainty in the markets and low prices.
  • "Ensuring equitable access to great teachers: State policy priorities." By Elizabeth Ross. Phi Delta Kappan, May 2019, pp. 20-26.
    Reports on a study of the state plans required by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) of 2015 to ensure vulnerable student populations have equitable access to talented teachers.
  • "How state pension subsidies undermine equity." By James Shuls, et al. Phi Delta Kappan, May 2019, pp. 37-41.
    Reviews recent studies to understand how some methods of funding teacher pensions can have a role in school finance inequity.
  • "Towards a new energy efficiency world order: Revisit our metrics." By Keith Dennis. Public Utilities Fortnightly, May 2019, pp. 100-102.
    Argues that energy efficiency program models need to be updated in order to adapt to changes in the energy industry.
  • "The heartbreaking, lifesaving practice of welcoming 'unaccompanied' child migrants." By Shikha Dalmia. Reason, June 2019, pp. 14-15.
    Compares and contrasts the movement to rescue children from life-threatening poverty and violence in Europe after World War I with the treatment of Latin American children attempting to gain asylum in the United States today.
  • "Palliative care beyond hospice is spreading to more states." By Michael Ollove. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), May 29, 2019, pp. 1-6.
    Reports more states are extending palliative care benefits to people who are not close to death, but who are living with serious illnesses. Explains state programs and policies vary according to geography, hospital size and income. Reports at http://features.commonwealthfund.org/health-care-in-america and https://nashp.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Palliative-Care-Brief-Final.pdf.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Finding Signed Copies of Bills and Session Law Chapter Numbers

Looking for signed copies of bills, or trying to determine in what session law chapter a bill can be found? Here are some tips.

 

Signed copies of bills

Bills that the Governor signed or allowed to become law without his signature are sent to the Secretary of State's office, where they will be made available online on the Bills and Resolutions page. The signing deadline for the 86th Legislature is Sunday, June 16.

 

You can determine whether a bill sent to the Governor was signed or filed without signature by checking the bill in the Texas Legislature Online. If the bill passed but was filed without signature, you will see the action "Filed without the Governor's signature."

 

Signed copies from the 78th - 85th Legislatures are available online at the University of North Texas Laws and Resolutions Archive. Copies of signed bills older than the 78th Regular Session are available through the Texas State Archives. Please call (512) 463-5480.

 

Session law chapter numbers

The Secretary of State's Bills and Resolutions page also lists the session law chapter number that is assigned to each bill that has become law. The session laws contain the text of all bills passed into law during a particular legislative session. Chapter numbers are used primarily for citing a bill in a legislative history annotation.

 

For questions about bill/chapter numbers for bills from the 86th R.S., please contact the Secretary of State's office at (512) 463-5561.

 

Session law chapter citations for previous sessions are available online through the Legislative Archive System. To view the complete bill/session law chapter cross reference table for a session, select the legislature in the "search by session law chapter" option and leave the chapter box blank. The LRL will be working to add these records for the 86th regular session.