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Interim Hearings – Week of April 1, 2024

Today's Committee Meetings on the LRL website is a calendar of interim committee hearings with links to agendas. Below are resources related to upcoming Interim Hearings.

 

April 2-4, 2024
House Investigative Committee on The Panhandle Wildfires (April 2, April 3, April 4)
Pampa, Texas

Topics:
(1) factors contributing to the wildfires;
(2) allocation of resources to and effectiveness of wildfire disaster preparedness and response; and
(3) coordination between local, state, and federal governmental entites with regard to wildfire prevention, disaster preparedness, and response.

 

Interim Hearings – Week of December 18, 2023

Today's Committee Meetings on the LRL website is a calendar of interim committee hearings with links to agendas. Below are resources related to upcoming Interim Hearings.

 

December 18, 2023
State Water Implementation Fund for Texas Advisory
Topic: The advisory committees shall review the overall operation, function, and structure of the funds at least semiannually and may provide comments and recommendations to the board on any matter.

 

Texas Infrastructure Resiliency Fund Advisory
Topic: The advisory committee shall review the overall operation, function, and structure of the resiliency fund at least semiannually and may provide comments and recommendations to the board on any matter.

 

 

Legislative Wrap-Ups, 88th Legislature

Following each legislative session in Texas, organizations, state agencies, and other entities publish "wrap-ups" summarizing new laws and key legislative developments in areas ranging from education to real estate to water conservation. Wrap-ups can range from a simple list of bills to a detailed report that includes background information and expert analysis.

 

The LRL tracks legislative wrap-ups, as we find them to be an excellent research tool and summary of the topics covered during a particular session. Listed below is a short selection. To find other wrap-ups on a topic that interests you, check the websites of organizations or state agencies that focus on the issue, or contact the library for assistance.

 

State Agencies

Employees Retirement System of Texas (ERS)
Summary of Legislative Action on ERS Programs and Operations

 

Hogg Foundation for Mental Health – University of Texas
Summary of Mental Health and Substance Use-Related Legislation

 

Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUC)
Summary of the 88th Legislative Session

 

Teacher Retirement System of Texas (TRS)
2023 TRS-Related Legislation Summary

 

Texas Commission on Fire Protection
Fire Protection-Related Legislation, 2023 (88th Legislative Session)

 

Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ)
Summaries of Selected Legislation Passed by the 88th Legislature, Regular Session

 

Texas Department of Insurance (TDI)
Worker’s Compensation Legislation Enacted

 

Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation (TDLR)
88th Texas Legislature: TDLR Related Bills

 

Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS)
Texas Metals Program – 88th Legislation 2023

 

Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT)
Delivering on Our Transportation Future: 88th Regular Legislative Session (2023) Summary of Enacted Transportation and General Government Legislation

 

Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB)
The 88th Legislature: A Texas-sized Investment in Higher Education

 

Texas Judicial Council (TJC)
Texas Judiciary Legislative Update – 88th Legislature

 

Texas Pension Review Board
Pension Bill Summaries – 88th Legislative Session

 

 

Associations and Organizations

American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Texas
The 88th Texas Legislature's Regular Session

 

Environment Texas
How the Environment Faired at the Texas Legislature (88th Regular Session)

 

Independent Bankers Association of Texas (IBAT)
Legislative White Paper: An Executive Summary for Community Bankers, July 2023

 

LeadingAge Texas
88th Legislative Session Summary – Sine Die Edition

 

National Rifle Association-Institute for Legislative Action (NRA-ILA)
Texas Legislature Ends Regular Session After Passing a Trio of Pro-Second Amendment Bills & Rejecting Gun Control Measures

 

Texas AFL-CIO
88th Legislative Session Wrap-Up

 

Texas Association of Business (TAB)
88th Results: 2023 Legislative Session

 

Texas Association of Dairymen (TAD)
Sine Die Report: 88th Texas Legislature

 

Texans Care for Children
Texas Children and the 2023 Legislative Session: What the Texas Legislature accomplished for children and where it fell short

 

Texas Classroom Teachers Assocation (TCTA)
Final Bill Summaries – 2023

 

Texas Computer Education Association (TCEA)
Recap of the 88th Texas Legislative Session

 

Texas District & County Attorneys Association (TDCAA)
TDCAA Legislative Update: 88th Regular Session, Week 20.1 (Sine Die Edition)

 

Texas Gun Sense
Texas 88th Legislative Session Report

 

Texas Humane Legislation Network
2023 Legislative Session

 

Texas Land Title Assotication (TLTA)
Texas Legislature 88th Session Results

 

Texas Library Association (TLA)
88th Legislative Session Wrap-Up

 

Texas Medical Association (TMA)
2023 Legislative Wrap-Up

 

Texas Municipal League (TML)

 

Texas Pharmacy Association (TPA)
88th Texas Legislative Session

 

Texas Realtors (TR)
Building a Better Texas: Broadband Improvements and Water Infrastructure Top the List of REALTOR wins at the 88th Texas Legislature

 

Texas Water Conservation Association (TWCA)
88th Legislative Wrap Up

 

Interim Hearings – Week of August 28, 2023

Today's Committee Meetings on the LRL website is a calendar of interim committee hearings with links to agendas. Below are resources related to upcoming Interim Hearings.

 

September 1, 2023
House Committee on Homeland Security & Public Safety and Work Session (Eagle Pass) CANCELED
Topic: Invited testimony only on Operation Lone Star, including from the following state and federal agencies:

Texas Department of Public Safety
Texas Military Department
Texas Division of Emergency Management
Office of the Governor
U.S. Customs & Border Patrol

 

 

Bill Statistics After Signing/Veto Period, 88th Legislature, R.S.

Sunday, June 18, 2023 was the last day the governor could sign or veto an enrolled bill from the 88th Regular Session. If neither action was taken, the bill became law without his signature.

88th Legislature, R.S., Statistics

The following bill statistics were calculated on June 20, 2023, at 4 p.m.

 

  House Bills (HBs) &
House Joint Resolutions (HJRs)
Senate Bills (SBs) &
Senate Joint Resolutions (SJRs)
Filed 5,619 2,726
Reported out of committee 2,200 866
Passed by chamber of origin 1,594 816
Referred to committee in opposite chamber 1,520 812
Reported out of committee in opposite chamber 871 631
Passed opposite chamber 769 513
Sent to the Governor 744 502
Signed by the Governor 629 409
Filed without the Governor's signature 92 39
Signed by the Governor/line item veto 1 0
Vetoed by the Governor 22 54

 

 

House Bills (HBs) & Senate Bills (SBs)
Filed 8,046
Sent to the Governor 1,246
Signed by the Governor 1,038
Filed without the Governor's signature 131
Signed by the Governor/line-item veto 1
Vetoed by the Governor 76
House Joint Resolutions (HJRs) & Senate Joint Resolutions (SJRs)
Filed 299
Filed with the Secretary of State 13
House Concurrent Resolutions (HCRs) & Senate Concurrent Resolutions (SCRs)
Filed 185
Filed with the Secretary of State 14
Sent to the Governor 86
Signed by the Governor 85
Filed without the Governor's signature 1
Vetoed by the Governor 0

 

To see how these statistics have changed, please view our previous bill statistics blog posts:

 

You can also view lists of bills by the governor's action on Texas Legislature Online (TLO).

1. On TLO's homepage, click on the "Reports" link under Additional Searches.

 

 

2. Then click on the "General Reports" tab to see the lists of bills by the governor's action.

 

Bill Statistics, Two Weeks After Sine Die, June 12, 2023

Sunday, June 18, 2023, is the last day the governor can sign or veto an enrolled bill. If neither action is taken, the bill becomes law without his signature.

 

88th Legislature, R.S., Statistics

The following bill statistics were calculated on June 13, 2023, at 8:45 a.m.

 

  House Bills (HBs) &
House Joint Resolutions (HJRs)
Senate Bills (SBs) &
Senate Joint Resolutions (SJRs)
Filed 5,619 2,726
Reported out of committee 2,200 866
Passed by chamber of origin 1,594 816
Referred to committee in opposite chamber 1,520 812
Reported out of committee in opposite chamber 871 631
Passed opposite chamber 769 513
Sent to the Governor 744 502
Signed by the Governor 459 236
Filed without the Governor's signature 51 24
Vetoed by the Governor 1 1

 

 

House Bills (HBs) & Senate Bills (SBs)
Filed 8,046
Sent to the Governor 1,246
Signed by the Governor 695
Filed without the Governor's signature 75
Vetoed by the Governor 2
House Joint Resolutions (HJRs) & Senate Joint Resolutions (SJRs)
Filed 299
Filed with the Secretary of State 13
House Concurrent Resolutions (HCRs) & Senate Concurrent Resolutions (SCRs)
Filed 185
Filed with the Secretary of State 14
Sent to the Governor 86
Signed by the Governor 61
Filed without the Governor's signature 1
Vetoed by the Governor 0

Previous bill statistics posts:

 

Updated Bill Statistics, June 5, 2023

Sunday, June 18, 2023, is the last day the governor can sign or veto an enrolled bill. If neither action is taken, the bill becomes law without his signature.

 

88th Legislature, R.S., Statistics

The following bill statistics were calculated on June 5, 2023, at 10:50 a.m.

 

  House Bills (HBs) &
House Joint Resolutions (HJRs)
Senate Bills (SBs) &
Senate Joint Resolutions (SJRs)
Filed 5,619 2,726
Reported out of committee 2,200 866
Passed by chamber of origin 1,594 816
Referred to committee in opposite chamber 1,520 812
Reported out of committee in opposite chamber 871 631
Passed opposite chamber 769 513
Sent to the Governor 742 501
Signed by the Governor 110 226
Filed without the Governor's signature 5 24
Vetoed by the Governor 1 1

 

 

House Bills (HBs) & Senate Bills (SBs)
Filed 8,046
Sent to the Governor 1,242
Signed by the Governor 336
Filed without the Governor's signature 29
Vetoed by the Governor 2
House Joint Resolutions (HJRs) & Senate Joint Resolutions (SJRs)
Filed 299
Filed with the Secretary of State 13
House Concurrent Resolutions (HCRs) & Senate Concurrent Resolutions (SCRs)
Filed 185
Filed with the Secretary of State 14
Sent to the Governor 86
Signed by the Governor 47
Filed without the Governor's signature 1
Vetoed by the Governor 0

Previous bill statistics posts:

 

What's Next? Post-Session FAQ and Bill Statistics, 88th R.S.

Bill Statistics:

House Bills (HBs) & Senate Bills (SBs)
Filed 8,046
Sent to the Governor 1,242
Signed by the Governor 270
Filed without the Governor's signature 23
Vetoed by the Governor 2
House Joint Resolutions (HJRs) & Senate Joint Resolutions (SJRs)
Filed 299
Filed with the Secretary of State 13
House Concurrent Resolutions (HCRs) & Senate Concurrent Resolutions (SCRs)
Filed 185
Filed with the Secretary of State 14
Sent to the Governor 86
Signed by the Governor 47
Filed without the Governor's signature 1
Vetoed by the Governor 0

*Statistics as of May 30, 2023, at 3 p.m. See our bill statistics page to compare these numbers with historical statistics.

 

Post-Session FAQ:

What happens now?

The 88th Regular Session ended Monday, May 29, 2023. Bills that pass both the House and the Senate are sent to the governor to sign, veto, or allow to become law without his signature.

 

When the Legislature passes a bill, does it become a law right away?

No. Under Article 4, Section 14 of the Texas Constitution, bills passed by the Legislature must be submitted to the governor for approval. The governor can sign a bill, veto it, line-item veto an appropriation, or allow a bill to become law without his signature.

 

How much time does the governor have to act on a bill?

The deadline for the governor to act on a bill is contingent upon the point in time in which the bill is presented to the governor.


If a bill is sent to the governor during the legislative session, the governor has 10 days (excluding Sundays) to sign the bill or return the bill to the Legislature with objection. If after 10 days the bill is not returned to the Legislature by the governor with objections or he has not yet signed it, the bill becomes law as if the governor had signed it.


If the Legislature has adjourned sine die, or if the bill is presented to the governor less than 10 days (excluding Sundays) prior to final adjournment, the governor has 20 days (including Sundays) after the final day of the session to sign or veto the bill. If neither action is taken, the bill becomes law without the governor's signature (Texas Const. art. IV, § 14).


Sunday, June 18, is the 20th day following the final adjournment of the 88th Regular Session. It is the last day the governor can sign or veto bills passed during the 88th Regular Session. The LRL's vetoes database will be updated for the 88th Regular Session as we receive those documents.

 

If the governor approves a bill, when will it take effect?

The text of a bill may include effective date provisions requiring the bill to take effect immediately, to take effect on a specified day, or there may be no mention of an effective date. Different sections of a bill may have different effective dates.


According to Article III, Section 39 of the Texas Constitution, a bill cannot become effective until at least 90 days after the session ends unless the bill passes both chambers with a favorable vote by two-thirds of the members.


Monday, August 28, 2023, is the 91st day following final adjournment; bills that do not specify an effective date and those that did not have the two-thirds vote necessary to take effect earlier will take effect on Monday, August 28, 2023.


If a bill received the votes necessary to become effective immediately, it will take effect on the date of the last action necessary for it to become law. This could be when the governor signs it, when the governor files it with the Secretary of State without approving or vetoing it, or when the time for the governor to act expires, if the bill has not been approved or vetoed during that time.

 

What happens to bills that do not pass?

Bills that do not make it completely through the legislative process die with the end of the session and are not automatically refiled during the next session.

 

What about other types of legislation?

Joint resolutions that pass both chambers of the Legislature are filed with the Secretary of State, and will be on the ballot as a proposed constitutional amendment for the November 7, 2023, election.


Concurrent resolutions generally require action by the governor. Concurrent resolutions used for administrative matters in the House and Senate do not require approval from the governor.


Simple resolutions are passed by only one chamber of the Legislature, and do not require the governor's approval.

 

Where can I find more information about special sessions?

You can start with the LRL's FAQ about special sessions. The LRL website's section devoted to special sessions also includes historical information, links to statutory authority pertaining to special sessions, and more.

 

Sources:

Bill Statistics, 133rd Day, 88th R.S.

Bill statistics comparing the 133rd day of the 88th and the 87th Regular Sessions are below. For information about what happens to a bill after it passes, please see our Legislative FAQ page.

 

Bill statistics for the period of November 14, 2022 — May 22, 2023, are below:

  House Bills (HBs) &
House Joint Resolutions (HJRs)
Senate Bills (SBs) &
Senate Joint Resolutions (SJRs)
Filed 5,619 2,726
Reported out of committee 2,200 866
Passed by chamber of origin 1,594 816
Referred to committee in opposite chamber 1,520 560
Reported out of committee in opposite chamber 863 631
Passed opposite chamber 549 377
Sent to the Governor 227 264
Signed by the Governor 9 95
Filed without the Governor's signature 1 5
Vetoed by the Governor 0 1

Previous bill statistics posts:

 

Conference Committee FAQs

The 88th Regular Session ends Monday, May 29, 2023. As the end of session draws near, the following information on conference committees may be helpful.

What is a conference committee?

From the Texas Legislative Glossary (Texas Legislative Council), a conference committee is “A committee composed of five members from each chamber appointed by the respective presiding officers to resolve the differences between the House and Senate versions of a measure when the originating chamber refuses to concur in the changes made by the opposite chamber.”

See also The Legislative Process in Texas (Texas Legislative Council, 2023) for more information on the conference committee process.

How do I know if a bill goes to conference committee?

The bill history or "Actions" list indicates if a bill goes to conference committee. In the list of actions, look for "House appoints conferees" or "Senate appoints conferees." These actions indicate that each chamber has agreed to go to conference committee and has appointed members to the committee. Bill histories can be viewed in Texas Legislature Online on the "History" and "Actions" pages of a bill.

 

How can I see who was appointed to a particular conference committee?

Conference committee appointees are entered into the Texas Legislature Online system as they are appointed and will be listed on the "History" page of the bill.

 

When do conference committees meet and are they open to the public?

Formal meeting notices are not always published for conference committee meetings and the meetings generally are not recorded. House Rules, Rule 13, Chapter C, §§ 6-13 and Senate Rules, Article XII address conference committee procedures.

How can I view conference committee reports?

After a conference committee has reached an agreement, a report is submitted to both chambers for approval or disapproval. The report must be accepted by at least three conferees from each chamber and must contain the agreed upon text of the bill, a side-by-side analysis (Ex. HB 5, 87th R.S.) comparing the text of the compromise bill to both the House and the Senate versions, and the signatures of the conferees who approved the report.

Conference committee reports can be found on the Legislative Reference Library website by clicking on "Legislation" on the navigation bar and then "Conference Committee Reports" in the drop-down menu.

 

 

Conference committee reports are also available on the "Text" page of a bill in Texas Legislature Online.

 

What if the conference committee wants to add language to the bill that is not included in either the House or Senate versions?

To add language to the bill that is not included in either the House or Senate versions, the conference committee obtains approval to suspend the language limitation found in the House and Senate rules by passing simple resolutions delineating the information they would like to include. In the bill history of the bill that went to conference committee, look for the actions "House adopts resolution to go outside bounds" and/or "Senate adopts resolution to go outside bounds." See HB 5 (87th R.S.) as an example. HR 1868 (87th R.S.) and SR 516 (87th R.S.) were adopted to add additional language to the conference committee report.

What happens if the conference committee report is not accepted by either chamber?

It may be returned to the same conference committee for further deliberation or the appointment of a new committee may be requested. If an agreement is not reached, the bill will not become law.

If the conference committee report is adopted by both chambers, the bill is enrolled, signed by the presiding officers, and sent to the governor.

What are the deadlines for conference committees?

According to the 88th Legislature, Regular Session Deadlines for Action under House and Senate Rules:

Friday, May 26:

  • Before midnight—House copies of conference committee report (CCR) on the general appropriations bill must be distributed (48-hour layout).
  • Before midnight—Senate copies of CCRs on tax, general appropriations, and reapportionment bills must be distributed (48-hour layout).

Saturday, May 27:

  • Before midnight—House copies of CCRs on joint resolutions and bills other than the general appropriations bill must be distributed (24-hour layout).
  • Before midnight—Senate copies of CCRs on joint resolutions and bills other than tax, general appropriations, and reapportionment bills must be distributed (24-hour layout).

Sunday, May 28:

  • Last day for House to adopt CCRs or discharge House conferees and concur in Senate amendments.
  • Last day for Senate to concur in House amendments or adopt CCRs.

 

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