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Current Articles & Research Resources, April 18

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Find election dates for 2019. (Texas Secretary of State, accessed April 17, 2019)
  • Track news updates from the Texas Department of State Health Services. (Texas Department of State Health Services, accessed April 17, 2019)
  • Consider recent approaches to changing the situation at the border. (The Heritage Foundation, April 11, 2019)
  • Read about America's infrastructure workforce. (Brookings, April 16, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Policymakers bet on sports wagering." By Lisa McKinney. Capitol Ideas, Issue 1 2019, pp. 12-13.
    Discusses the United States Supreme Court's May 2018 ruling in Murphy v. National Collegiate Athletic Association and potential state legalization of sports betting.
  • "CBD goes mainstream." Consumer Reports, May 2019, pp. 44-50.
    Examines the results of a survey on cannabidiol [CBD], a compound extracted from hemp and marijuana. Provides insights into who is using CBD, why they use it, and how effective they say it is.
  • "Corporate crises: The new age of corporate scandals." Economist, April 6th-12th, 2019, pp.51-53.
    Discusses the rise in corporate misconduct and scandals, including those involving Boeing, Goldman Sachs, Wells Fargo, and Facebook. Suggests the abatement of three forces that constrained corporate conduct — regulation, litigation, and competition — has increased the incentive for firms to take more risks.
  • "State ESSA report cards fall short, asserts data-transparency group." By Daarel Burnette II. Education Week, April 10, 2019, pp. 21, 25.
    Summarizes results of a study conducted on how well states are collecting and reporting required school data under the Every Student Succeeds Act [ESSA]. Notes Texas is still not complying with ESSA's reporting requirements in teacher effectiveness and student discipline.
  • "Selling AI: The case of fully autonomous vehicles." By Diane E. Bailey and Ingrid Erickson. Issues in Science and Technology, Spring 2019, pp. 57-61.
    Examines claims that autonomous vehicles are the sole means of reducing motor vehicle deaths. Discusses the "Safe System" approach to improving traffic safety through both technological advances and improvements to road infrastructure. (Related document at: http://pubdocs.worldbank.org/en/912871516999678053/Report-Safe-Systems-final.pdf)
  • "Retirement insecurity 2019: Americans' views of the retirement crisis." By Diane Oakley and Kelly Kenneally. National Institute on Retirement Security, March 2019, pp. 1-28. (Note length)
    Presents public opinion poll findings on retirement issues in the United States, including pension plans for state and local government employees.
  • "Keeping up the pace: State, city, and private sector transportation decarbonization."  By Fatima Maria Ahmad. Natural Resources & Environment, Spring 2019, pp. 40-44.
    Highlights state and regional efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector, including: cap-and-invest programs, electronic vehicle charging corridors, and zero emissions vehicles programs. Discusses private sector efforts and opportunities to meet new demand with electric vehicle development and charging infrastructure.
  • "Under the gun." By Paige Williams. New Yorker, April 8, 2019, pp. 26-32.
    Highlights the "Stop the Bleed" protocol developed by the Hartford Consensus to provide rapid casualty care at intentional mass casualty events. Discusses the priority of training and equipping a wide variety of people with these techniques since the real first responders are bystanders at these incidents.
  • "The short-term outlook for the Texas economy." By M. Ray Perryman. Perryman Report and Texas Letter, Vol. 36, No. 2, pp. 1-3, 6.
    Discusses factors that are contributing to the growth of the Texas economy, as well as key patterns affecting future performance over the 2018-2023 period.
  • "Bill looks to end noncompetes." By Jessica Corso. San Antonio Business Journal, March 29, 2019, pp. 8.
    Highlights HB1522, 86th Legislature, which would bar staffing agencies at oil and gas companies from requiring workers sign noncompete agreements.
  • "Position as top exporting state exposes Texas to shifting trade policy." By Jesus Canas and Stephanie Gullo. Southwest Economy (Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas), First Quarter 2019, pp. 3-7.
    Analyzes Texas' comparative trade advantage, especially in energy-related manufacturing and oil and gas mining. Describes how trade policy uncertainty and steel and aluminum tariffs could disrupt and affect the world standing of Texas manufacturing.
  • "Back from the brink." By Savannah Gilmore and Erica Mackellar. State Legislatures, March/April 2019, pp. 8-11, 13.
    Reports federal tax reforms, United States Supreme Court decisions, and legislative changes to states' tax policies have resulted in net revenue increases, placing states in a better position to weather the next economic downturn.
  • "Eminent domain works in Texas — for the takers." By Russell Boening. Texas Agriculture, April 5, 2019, p. 2.
    Discusses the eminent domain process in Texas and how it negatively affects land owners. Mentions HB991 and SB421, 86th Legislature.
  • "Results of the 2018 unfunded mandate survey."  Texas County Progress, April 2019, pp. 16-23.
    Reviews the effects various unfunded and under-funded mandates have on local government and property taxes. (Report at: https://31j8fe2l56f122iue1wuvve1-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/2018-Unfunded-Mandates-Book-Final_WebVersion.pdf)
  • "AIMing to save lives." By Sean Price. Texas Medicine, April 2019, pp. 21-23.
    Discusses maternal health initiatives that prevent maternal deaths in hospital settings. Highlights AIM Bundles, guidelines set up by the Alliance for Innovation on Maternal Health [AIM]. Includes maternal health-related bills from the 86th Legislature.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

 

Current Articles & Research Resources, April 11

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Read about proposed legislation in Congress that would prohibit the IRS from offering free tax filing online. (ProPublica, April 9, 2019)
  • Consider work zone safety on Texas roads. (Texas Department of Transportation, April 8, 2019)
  • Beware of phone scammers after your personal information. (Texas Health & Human Services, April 9, 2019)
  • See how well your science knowledge stacks up against other Americans. (Pew Research Center, March 28, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Dismal grades." By Lorelei Laird. ABA Journal: The Lawyer's Magazine, April 2019, pp. 18-19.
    Reports the advent of legislatively-mandated school performance standards is helping school finance litigation plaintiffs convince courts that states aren't giving school districts the funding necessary to meet those standards.
  • "Do ecosystems have rights?" By Amanda Paulson and Henry Gass. Christian Science Monitor, April 1, 2019, pp. 16-17.
    Considers the rights-of-nature movement as embodied in the "Lake Erie Bill of Rights" recently passed by voters in Toledo, Ohio. Reviews the various legal principles that might be used to interpret such rights.
  • "Admissions officers didn't cause the scandal. But they helped shape the culture that spawned it." By Eric Hoover. Chronicle of Higher Education, March 22, 2019, pp. A10-A11.
    Explains the recent college admission scandal uncovered the wealth and privilege that have long been a part of college admission issues in setting up unfair advantages for higher-income students. Suggests this is an opportunity for colleges to examine more rigorously the inequities in current processes and procedures.
  • "Why thousands of college grads start their careers at a rental-car-company." By Beckie Supiano. Chronicle of Higher Education, March 15, 2019, pp. A10-A12, A14.
    Profiles the management-training program at Enterprise Rent-A-Car and its requirement that candidates have a bachelor's degree. Explains the company sees degree completion as evidence of competencies necessary to succeed in an entry-level job and move up.
  • "Joint resolution." By Jennifer Shutt. CQ Weekly, March 4, 2019, pp. 16-22.
    Discusses federal legislation to loosen the nation's marijuana laws and the unlikely coalition of lawmakers behind the effort for change. Addresses the growing acceptance of marijuana use, the disparities between federal and state laws, and the outlook for changing marijuana policy.
  • "Hanging with the anti-vaxxers: Sharp exchanges." Economist, March 30th-April 5th, 2019, pp. 34, 36.
    Considers how the pro-vaccine camp can respond effectively to those who oppose vaccines. Notes the growing influence of vaccine-choice political action committees.
  • "Fairness matters: A chart book on who pays state and local taxes." Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, March 2019, pp. 1-18.
    Analyzes the distribution of state and local taxes and the adequacy of tax systems to fund schools, health care, infrastructure, and other public services. Illustrates the tax burden in sales tax-reliant systems, especially for low- and moderate-income families. Includes Texas. (Related document at: https://itep.org/whopays/).
  • "Why do hundreds of US women die annually in childbirth?" By Anita Slomski. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), April 2, 2019, pp. 1239-1241.
    Investigates rising maternal mortality rates in the United States and underlying causes of pregnancy-related deaths. Reports 60 percent of maternal deaths are preventable and the leading cause of death varies significantly by race.
  • "The short-term forecast for the US economy." By M. Ray Perryman. Perryman Report and Texas Letter, Vol. 36, No. 1, pp. 1-3, 6.
    Highlights the latest forecast for the economy over the 2018 to 2023 period.
  • "Lower oil prices, tight labor markets to restrain Texas growth in 2019." By Keith R. Phillips and Judy Teng. Southwest Economy (Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas), First Quarter 2019, pp. 10-13.
    Presents an economic forecast of the Texas energy, manufacturing, and construction sectors for 2019.
  • "The final word: Dennis Bonnen." By Jane Carroll Andrade. State Legislatures, March/April 2019, pp. 37.
    Interviews Texas House Speaker Dennis Bonnen.
  • "An analysis of Texas jail bookings: How Texas counties could save millions of dollars by safely diverting people from jail." Appendix. Texas Appleseed, April 2, 2019, pp. 1-11.
    Analyzes jail booking records from large Texas counties (Bell, Collin, Dallas, El Paso, Fort Bend, Galveston, Hidalgo, Jefferson, McLennan, Montgomery, Tarrant, and Travis), to describe who is being booked into jail, on what charges, and how long they are staying. Addresses how counties could safely reduce jail populations.
  • "Time and treasure: Faith-based response to Hurricane Harvey." By Noah Westfall, Erica Nelson and Bee Moorhead. Texas Interfaith Center for Public Policy, March 10, 2019, pp. 1-10.
    Highlights the role of faith-based communities in Hurricane Harvey disaster response and recovery. Advocates a public/private collaboration for disaster response in Texas that would ensure financial accountability and transparency.
  • "Borders without enough doctors." By Sean Price. Texas Medicine, April 2019, pp. 30-37.
    Profiles El Paso physicians who volunteer their time to provide medical care for asylum-seekers along the Texas border. Reports their goal is to build a nationwide network of volunteer doctors.
  • "Goodbye to an aquifer." By Brantley Hargrove. Texas Monthly, April 2019, pp. 90-102.
    Discusses the effects of recent drought and population increase on the Trinity Aquifer and the availability of groundwater in Bell County and Williamson County. Contrasts the work of the Clearwater Underground Water Conservation District in Bell County and the lack of a groundwater conservation district in Williamson County. Mentions HB1594, 86th Legislature.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, April 4

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Compare citation in lieu of arrest policies among the states. (National Conference of State Legislatures, March 18, 2019)
  • Track cases of EV-D68 and its association with acute flaccid myelitis. (Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, March 29, 2019)
  • Consider whether automakers should be held accountable for auto accidents. (Regulation, Spring 2019)
  • Read about the gender wage gap by occupation. (Institute for Women's Policy Research, April 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "A jolt to the system." By Mary Ellen McIntire. CQ Weekly, March 25, 2019, pp. 14-18, 20, 22-23.
    Discusses how "Medicare for All" or a single-payer health care system could affect health care and the economy in the United States. Suggests health care will be a significant but divisive issue in the 2020 elections.
  • "New frontier in old war." By Sandhya Raman. CQ Weekly, March 4, 2019, pp. 23-26.
    Addresses medication abortions and the conflicts surrounding access to the procedure. Discusses pending litigation that could change the future of medication abortion.
  • "Cyberdefense for Texas state government: Public data systems, infrastructure under attack." By Jackie Benton. Fiscal Notes, March 2019, pp. 7-10.
    Reviews the tougher cybersecurity requirements and the state's implementation of the Texas Cybersecurity Act (HB8, 85th Legislature, R.S.) and the Texas Cybercrime Act (HB9, 85th Legislature, R.S.) and cybersecurity appropriations in the 2018-19 state budget. Interviews Representative Giovanni Capriglione.
  • "Texas cybersecurity: Protecting data systems: Texans lose big to cybercrime." By Courtney King. Fiscal Notes, March 2019, pp. 1, 3-6.
    Charts annual costs of cybercrime by industry sector and compares Texas to other states in terms of cybercrime victims and financial losses. Describes cybersecurity efforts in Texas and the labor shortage of information security analysts.
  • "Texas brew." By Marcie Richter. Fort Worth Business Press, March 25-31, 2019, pp. 12-13.
    Addresses efforts by craft spirits distilleries and breweries to lift restrictive laws relating to the sale of products to-go. Argues changes are necessary in order for these smaller craft businesses to succeed.
  • "2018 in review: Remote vendor nexus." By Steve Oldroyd and Todd Faciana. Journal of State Taxation, Spring 2019, pp. 21-26.
    Reviews sales-and-use tax developments of 2018 that affect remote vendors, including the United States Supreme Court decision in South Dakota v. Wayfair.
  • "Warning: The plastic crisis is about to get worse: Fracking triggered a production boom – with toxic consequences." By Zoe Carpenter. Nation, April 1, 2019, pp. 12-17, 26.
    Discusses expansion of plastics production and the petrochemical industry in the United States, including new and expanded facilities, pipelines, and shipping infrastructure. Highlights a dispute about Exxon's site for Project Yosemite on farmland north of Corpus Christi and citizen concerns in Portland, Texas. Mentions Governor Greg Abbott.
  • "A low cost LEGO house decree!" By Michael Hendrix. National Review, March 25, 2019, pp. 22-23.
    Considers modular construction as a way to alleviate the housing shortage by cutting construction time in half and reducing costs by up to 20 percent. Describes modular construction as offsite manufacturing of prefabricated units that are later assembled on-site.
  • "Scoot over: Get ready for rental mopeds." By Eric Boehm. Reason, May 2019, p. 17.
    Identifies rental mopeds as the next feature in the "micromobility" trend hitting cities. Suggests mopeds have advantages over scooters such as better visibility for other motorists, seating for two riders, higher speeds, and storage compartments for helmets.
  • "Gun-rights counties vow to resist new restrictions." By Matt Vasilogambros. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), April 2, 2019, pp. 1-7.
    Reports more than two hundred counties are pushing back against state legislatures — refusing to enforce new state laws that restrict gun access.
  • "STAAR wars." By Mimi Swartz. Texas Monthly, April 2019, pp. 50-60.
    Profiles educators and education advocates and their concerns with the readability level of the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness [STAAR] test. Includes past efforts to study and reevaluate the reading section of the test.
  • "Black market wildlife." By Russell Roe. Texas Parks and Wildlife Magazine, April 2019, pp. 32-37.
    Investigates the illegal wildlife trade in Texas. Examines how illegally taken and smuggled wildlife can affect Texas' ecosystems.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, March 28

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • See how Austin tops the list of best cities for wildlife. (National Wildlife Federation, March 12. 2019)
  • Note the federal rule banning bump stocks became effective on March 26, 2019. (The Federal Register, accessed March 27, 2019)
  • Find judicial nomination statistics for U.S. district and circuit courts. (Congressional Research Service, March 21, 2019)
  • Get answers to all your bluebonnet questions. (Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, ©2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Texas may collect more online sales taxes." By Kimberly Reeves. Austin Business Journal, March 22, 2019, p. 18.
    Highlights SB70 and SB890, 86th Legislature, proposals creating a streamlined process to collect sales tax from out-of-state online retailers and setting up the mechanism for the remittance of payments. Includes comments by Senator Donna Campbell and mentions former Representative John Otto.
  • "Solving unsolved murders." By Patrik Jonsson. Christian Science Monitor, March 4, 2019, pp. 24-30.
    Explains over 250,000 unsolved murder cases have accumulated in the United States since 1980, with a current average of 40 percent of cases going unsolved. Discusses the causes of the increased caseload and new approaches to solving cold cases.
  • "Day care for all." Economist, March 9th-15th, 2019, pp. 26, 28.
    Suggests a proposal for nationwide publicly-funded child care centers would be less efficient than simple cash transfers to poor families with children.
  • "Immigrant health, value-based care, and emergency Medicaid reform." By Dhruv Khullar and Dave A. Chokshi. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), March 12, 2019, pp. 928-929.
    Argues that there are economic and public health advantages to states availing themselves of existing policy options to provide limited, value-oriented health care coverage (such as prenatal and dialysis-related care) to immigrant populations.
  • "Anyone's game: Sports-betting regulations after Murphy v. NCAA." By Patrick Moran. Legal Policy Bulletin (CATO Institute), March 11, 2019, pp. 1-10.
    Suggests the federal government should leave the regulation of sports betting to the states, as they have done for other types of gambling. Related information at: https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/17pdf/16-476_dbfi.pdf.
  • "Mexican-American resistance to school segregation." By Jarrod Hanson and Ruben Donato. Phi Delta Kappan, February 2019, pp. 39-42.
    Examines the school segregation of Mexican-American children by highlighting five court cases (including two from Texas) that illustrate how local school officials made intentional decisions based on social status and race.
  • "Who benefits from increasing health insurance subsidies: Patients or providers?By Marika Cabral. Policy Brief (Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research), March 2019, pp. 1-4.
    Finds that a little over half of Medicare Advantage subsidy increases are passed on to beneficiaries in the form of lower premiums or improved benefits — a pressing concern for seniors who depend on Medicare for health care coverage.
  • "Does storage increase carbon? Expect the unexpected." By Charles Bayless. Public Utilities Fortnightly, March 2019, pp. 54-58.
    Explains how energy storage transactions could actually increase carbon emissions. Related information at: https://inesazevedo.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/HIttinger_2015.pdf.
  • "Poll on paid sick leave hints at voters' power of change." By Tony Quesada. San Antonio Business Journal, March 15, 2019, p. 3.
    Examines a recent poll that showed 74 percent of Texas voters support municipalities requiring businesses to offer paid sick days.
  • "Rural America faces a housing cost crunch." By Tim Henderson. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), March 25, 2019, pp. 1-4.
    Discusses the problem of housing affordability, attributing the crisis in rural rental housing to the expiration of federal incentive programs. Points out Texas' Irion County had one of the largest household cost-burden increases in 2017.
  • "A field guide to the taxes of Texas." Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, March 2019, pp. 1-25.
    Provides a graphical overview of major Texas state and local taxes, including sales and use, motor vehicle sales, motor fuel, franchise, oil production, and natural gas production taxes. Describes revenue by source, future revenue growth, historical volatility, and major exemptions for each tax. Includes charts on local property and sales taxes.
  • "Rounds: News from America's best medical society." By Joey Berlin, Sean Price, and David Doolittle. Texas Medicine, March 2019, pp. 14-19.
    Summarizes highlights of the Texas Medical Association [TMA]'s recent advocacy concerns, including a pay bump for physicians seeing Medicaid patients, insurance reform, rural hospitals, maternal and children's health issues, and do-not-resuscitate [DNR] laws.
  • "Home economics." By Gus Bova and Christopher Collins. Texas Observer, March/April 2019, pp. 24-28.
    Examines how immigrants are reviving rural communities such as Dalhart, Texas, where most voters support President Donald Trump.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, March 21

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Accenture grilled over IT contract gone awry." By Kimberly Reeves. Austin Business Journal, March 8, 2019, p. A4.
    Reports on the delays and ballooning costs associated with the overhaul of the state's child support system. Includes comments by Representative Giovanni Capriglione.
  • "Infrastructure: Derailment in California." By Mark Niquette. Bloomberg Businessweek, March 4, 2019, pp. 42-43.
    Explores the costs and controversy related to the California bullet-train project. Contrasts the California project with the Texas Central Partners' Texas bullet-train project..
  • "How UT-Austin's bold plan for reinvention went belly up." By Lindsay Ellis. Chronicle of Higher Education, March 8, 2019, pp. A12-A14, A16, A18.
    Examines the University of Texas at Austin's Project 21, an initiative aimed at reimagining the undergraduate experience through a redesign of curricula and increased use of live, online classes. Suggests many problems led to the demise of the project, including a lack of clear direction, bureaucratic issues, and funding.
  • "Measles: Fever Pitch." Economist, March 9th-15th, 2019, p. 81.
    Provides an overview of measles outbreaks in America. Points out almost half of the counties in the United States have a vaccination rate lower than the level needed to prevent an outbreak.
  • "Texas politics: Twilight in Austin." Economist, March 9th-15th, 2019, pp. 23-24.
    Discusses Texas Republicans' change of tone and approach in the 86th Legislature and the move away from divisive social issues that marked the 2017 session. Includes comments by former House Speaker Joe Straus.
  • "Firearm policies that work." By April M. Zeoli and Daniel W. Webster. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), March 12, 2019, pp. 937-938.
    Examines policies that have been implemented with the hope of reducing firearm injury deaths, including prohibiting individuals who have committed violence in the past from possessing a firearm and deregulation of civilian gun-carrying policies. Argues that evidence indicates prohibiting high-risk individuals from possessing firearms is most effective.
  • "Defund it already." By Alexandra DeSanctis. National Review, March 11, 2019, pp. 35-37.
    Reviews previous attempts to defund Planned Parenthood from federal programs.
  • "What is the Green New Deal?" By Travis Kavulla. National Review, March 11, 2019, p. 14-16.
    Describes the body of the Green New Deal as being direct government investment in renewable energy coupled with progressive social policies. Argues instead for a Customer Empowerment Act that allows more choice for electric customers and suggests the marketplace is the best model for uniting customers with clean energy at an economical price.
  • "The myth of de facto segregation." Phi Delta Kappan, February 2019, pp. 35-38.
    Explains how racial segregation exacerbates student achievement gaps by concentrating children with the most serious challenges at the same schools. Argues prevailing patterns of residential segregation arose from specific government policies and not de facto personal decisions.
  • "Can victims' rights go too far?" By Matthew Harwood. Reason, April 2019, pp. 34-40.
    Reviews the background and rise of the Marsy's Law movement and its goal of increasing victims' rights in state laws. Details concerns about the laws' assault on due process and the presumption of innocence.
  • "Dubious diagnosis." By Charles Piller. Science, March 8, 2019, pp. 1026-1031.
    Examines the tenuous diagnosis of "prediabetes" and whether patients diagnosed with the condition benefit from treatment with pharmaceuticals.
  • "Mental health trails metal detectors in school safety dollars." By Christine Vestal. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), March 13, 2019, pp. 1-5.
    Examines the debate over how much state money to invest in school mental health services versus metal detectors and alarm systems. Mentions Governor Greg Abbott's school safety action plan and the Austin Independent School District's mental health centers.
  • "Farmers, ranchers advocate for eminent domain reform in Austin." By Jennifer Dorsett. Texas Agriculture, March 1, 2019, p. 12.
    Highlights Texas farmers' and ranchers' concerns regarding eminent domain. Mentions HB991 and SB421.
  • "Closing a loophole." By Joey Berlin.Texas Medicine, March 2019, pp. 36-38.
    Describes how some hospital systems may be circumventing the intent of SB1148, 85th Legislature, R.S., which puts the decision of whether to require MOC [maintenance of certification] into the hands of the physicians on staff. Calls for bill clarifying the statute.
  • "Dammed to fail." By Naveena Sadasivam. Texas Observer, March/April 2019, pp. 12-17.
    Investigates the failure rate of unregulated dams in Texas. Addresses legislation that removed state oversight of small dams in 2011. Mentions Representative Charlie Geren.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

 

Current Articles & Research Resources, March 14

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Read about the CDC's new study on e-scooter injuries. (CNBC, March 8, 2019)
  • See which states have laws that address medical balance billing. (National Conference of State Legislatures, March 2019)
  • Track Medicaid eligibility with a federal database for states offered by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid. (Council of State Governments, March 12, 2019)
  • Consider differences between Medicare Fee-for-Service and Medicare Advantage. (The Manhattan Institute, February 28, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "K-12 school funding up in most 2018 teacher-protest states, but still well below decade ago." By Michael Leachman and Eric Figueroa. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, March 6, 2019, pp. 1-14.
    Analyzes trends in state K-12 school finance and per pupil spending since the 2008 recession, including the effect of recent teacher protests in Arizona, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and West Virginia on school funding levels. Mentions Texas state formula funding per student is now 20 percent under 2008 levels, adjusted for inflation.
  • "State-level data for understanding child welfare in the United States: Child maltreatment, foster care, adoption from foster care, kinship caregiving: Texas state profiles." Child Trends, February 26, 2019, pp. 1-8.
    Presents state and national data, including Texas state profiles, on child maltreatment, foster care, kinship caregiving, and adoption, for fiscal year 2017.
  • "Praying for sanity." By Rob Boston. Church & State, March 2019, pp. 11-12.
    Addresses common myths about the role of prayer, Bible reading, and religion in public schools.
  • "Texas leaves $4B on the table every year because of this policy, study finds." By Evan Hoopfer. Dallas Business Journal, February 22, 2019, p. 23.
    Highlights study produced for the Texas Association of Manufacturers that finds the state's aerospace and defense sectors could benefit economically if the Texas franchise tax is aligned with federal requirements in the Federal Acquisition Regulation.
  • "Medicine: A higher purpose." Economist, March 2nd-8th, 2019, pp. 47-48.
    Examines the rising interest in the re-purposing of off-patent drugs. Considers whether the benefits outweigh high costs and regulatory obstacles.
  • "Social media and law enforcement — watching: The detectives." Economist, February 23rd-March 1st, 2019, pp. 28-29.
    Examines how the police track what people say and do online. Raises privacy concerns.
  • "Rethinking the structure of teacher retirement benefits: Analyzing the preferences of entering teachers." By Josh B McGee and Marcus A. Winters. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, March 2019, pp. 63-78.
    Explores the differences between two types of defined benefit retirement plans for teachers. Presents evidence that teachers in New York City and Philadelphia prefer the cash balance plan [CB], an alternative model to the final average salary [FAS] plan, which most public school teachers participate in today.
  • "Jungle warfare – Amazon HQ2 disclosure fights and battle over tax transparency." Journal of MultiState Taxation and Incentives, March/April 2019, pp. 36-39.
    Discusses the legal battles and transparency concerns about the state and local tax [SALT] incentive packages offered to Amazon for its second headquarters. Notes the Amazon HQ2 lottery has led to increased attention on corporate financial and tax incentives generally. Uses Kentucky as a recent example of tax transparency conflicts.
  • "The jail health-care crisis." By Steve Coll. New Yorker, March 4, 2019, pp. 28-37.
    Considers the state of medical care for jail inmates and the increased use of for-profit companies to provide these services. Highlight's Texas' Sandra Bland Act as an example of reform in the care of the incarcerated.
  • "Side effects in education: Winners and losers in school voucher programs." By Yong Zhao. Phi Delta Kappan, February 2019, pp. 63-66.
    Reviews studies analyzing the benefits of school choice initiatives.
  • "The wall won't end pot smuggling at the border. Legalization will." By David Bier. Reason, April 2019, pp. 22-29.
    Argues smuggling of marijuana across the Mexican border has decreased due to legalization in the United States. Suggests the same principle should be applied to the illegal immigration problem.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, March 7

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Consider the costs states bear in the wake of natural disasters. (National Conference of State Legislatures, February 25, 2019)
  • Explore the demographics of the United States Congress. (Brookings, March 4, 2019)
  • Find out who buys and sells your personal data. (Fast Company, March 2, 2019)
  • Track pedestrian traffic fatalities by state. (Governors Highway Safety Association, February 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "A new 'caravan' enters Mexico, a different welcome awaits." By Louisa Reynolds. Christian Science Monitor, February 11, 2019, p. 10.
    Profiles Mexico's new immigration policy allowing Central Americans to request a renewable one-year humanitarian visa. Explains the visa allows free movement and formal employment, and estimates 40 percent of those traveling with previous caravans requested asylum in Mexico.
  • "The new 'in loco parentis'." By Vimal Patel. Chronicle of Higher Education, February 22, 2019, pp. B35-B36, B38-B39.
    Considers the changing philosophy of in loco parentis, the idea that colleges should act "in the place of the parent," in their responsibility for students. Provides a sidebar highlighting court cases that have led to changing views.
  • "The rise of the mega-university." By Lee Gardner. Chronicle of Higher Education, February 22, 2019, pp. B28-B30, B32.
    Explores the role of large nonprofit, online institutions, such as Western Governors University, and explains how they are influencing higher education.
  • "Beer-to-go could get go-ahead." By Kimberly Reeves. Dallas Business Journal, February 22, 2019, p. 2.
    Comments on SB312 and HB672, 86th Legislature, legislation that would permit craft breweries to sell beer-to-go at their manufacturing facilities. Includes comments by Senator Dawn Buckingham and Representative Eddie Rodriguez.
  • "State environmental regulator goes to bat for faster emissions permitting." By Kimberly Reeves. Dallas Business Journal, March 1, 2019, p. 2.
    Reports the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality commissioner is seeking to close a funding gap in the state's expedited process for air permits, urging legislators to double the state's funding to $2.14 million.
  • "Opioids: The death curve." Economist, February 23rd-March 1st, 2019, pp. 21-23.
    Reviews the origins of the opioid crisis, charts the overdose rate since 1980, and comments on the slow and inadequate federal response to the crisis. Estimates the epidemic will continue for five to ten years, killing 50,000 people each year.
  • "Resisting the allure of gross receipts taxes: An assessment of their costs and consequences." By Garrett Watson. Fiscal Fact (Tax Foundation), February 2019, pp. 1-18.
    Discusses the history, increasing popularity, and economic impact of gross receipts taxes on businesses. Describes the complexity of Texas' margin tax.
  • "Health care spending slowed after Rhode Island applied affordability standards to commercial insurers." By Aaron Baum, et al. Health Affairs, February 2019, pp. 237-245.
    Offers Rhode Island as a case study of a state that has successfully slowed total commercial health care spending growth, while maintaining quality, through setting price controls on contracts between commercial insurers and hospitals and clinics.
  • "What businesses will lobby for at the Texas Capitol in 2019." Houston Business Journal, January 31, 2019, pp. 18-19.
    Examines key issues that business leaders will seek to address during the legislative session. Highlights Houston area and state-wide legislation that covers property tax reform, business incentive programs, and the minimum wage.
  • "How to survive a death crisis." By Maia Szalavitz. Nation, March 11/18, 2019, pp. 16-21.
    Discusses a "harm reduction" approach to the opioid crisis and notes overdose is now the leading cause of death for adults under 50 in the United States.
  • "Public pension plan investment return assumptions (2019)." National Association of State Retirement Administrators, Updated February 2019, pp. 1-8.
    Describes how investment return assumptions are established and evaluated in public pension funds, compared with public funds' actual investment experience. Includes Texas County & District, Texas ERS, Texas LECOS, Texas Municipal, and Texas Teachers in the appendix. Related information at: https://www.nasra.org/latestreturnassumptions.
  • "A 2-week weather forecast may be as good as it gets." By Paul Voosen. Science, February 22, 2019, p. 801.
    Explains why there are limits to global weather prediction models that prevent accurate forecasts from looking farther ahead than two weeks.
  • "The weather amplifier." By Michael E. Mann. Scientific American, March 2019, pp. 42-49.
    Considers how unusual patterns in the jet stream affect weather events in the United States.
  • "Farmers hope for hemp riches despite risks." By April Simpson. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), February 27, 2019, pp. 1-9.
    Highlights Kentucky's highly regulated approach in developing the state's industrialized hemp sector. Notes Texas is among states that have not enacted legislation to establish industrial hemp cultivation.
  • "Bills seek more transparency, fairness in eminent domain cases." By Julie Tomascik. Texas Agriculture, February 1, 2019, p. 16.
    Highlights SB421 and HB991, 86th Legislature, bills that could change how private entities with eminent domain authority must negotiate with landowners to acquire property before turning to condemnation.
  • "The future of the death penalty: The seeds of time." By John Charles Boger. Texas Tech Law Review, Fall 2018, pp. 75-94.
    Considers recent treatment of the death penalty by members of the current United States Supreme Court.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, February 28

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Consider how the state's oil and gas industry affects transportation infrastructure. (Texas A&M Transportation Institute, February 6, 2019)
  • Read about federal mail and wire fraud statutes. (Congressional Research Service, February 11, 2019)
  • Find where to dispose of prescription drugs. (Google, February 21, 2019)
  • See which Texas counties are included in the recent federal disaster declaration related to last year's flooding and storms. (The White House, February 25, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "Better state budget, policy decisions can improve health." By Jennifer Sullivan. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, February 21, 2019, pp. 1-23.
    Discusses how states can invest in programs to affect the "social determinants of health" – health programs, education, the environment, transit, and infrastructure – apart from health care policy. Outlines the role of race/ethnicity and income in health outcomes.
  • "One border crisis averted?" By Henry Gass. Christian Science Monitor, February 11, 2019, pp. 16-17.
    Highlights the proactive approach El Paso Water's Edmund Archuleta has taken to improve water conservation. Discusses the successful program he implemented with his counterpart in Juárez to share data and information to conserve the Hueco Bolson aquifer.
  • "Buoyed by strong economies, most states spend more on higher ed." By Eric Kelderman. Chronicle of Higher Education, February 8, 2019, p. A25.
    Reports state spending on higher education grew almost four percent in fiscal year 2018-19 according to the "Grapevine" survey compiled by the Center for the Study of Education Policy at Illinois State University and the State Higher Education Executive Officers.
  • "What's the future of transportation funding?" By Paul K. Harral. Fort Worth Business Press, February 18-24, 2019, pp. 36-38.
    Summarizes panel discussion on transportation funding from the Northeast Tarrant Transportation Summit from February 8, 2019.
  • "Access to e-prescriptions and related technologies before and after Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria." By Jaime Y. Smith and Max M. Sow. Health Affairs, February 2019, pp. 205-211.
    Finds that while e-prescribing and medication history transactions decreased considerably during the major 2017 hurricanes, transaction volumes returned to normal levels in the days immediately following Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. Notes that e-prescribing in Puerto Rico took much longer to return to baseline levels, demonstrating the importance of infrastructure to maintain accessibility of electronic health records [EHRs] in a disaster.
  • "Hospital prices grew substantially faster than physician prices for hospital-based care in 2007-14." By Zack Cooper, et al. Health Affairs, February 2019, pp. 184-189.
    Reports that for inpatient care, hospital prices grew 42 percent from 2007-2014, while physician prices grew 18 percent; for hospital-based outpatient care, hospital prices grew 25 percent, while physician prices grew 6 percent. Suggests several approaches policymakers could take to address hospital price growth.
  • "Should physicians recommend replacing opioids with cannabis?" By Keith Humphreys and Richard Saltz. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), February 19, 2019, pp. 639-640.
    Considers the efficacy of cannabis for chronic pain and for opioid use disorder and the risks of cannabis use. Argues that if cannabis is to become recommended medicine, it should be held to medical standards.
  • "Opportunity Zone investments: The new emerald city of tax law." By Steven Berman and Louis Weller. Journal of MultiState Taxation and Incentives, February 2019, pp. 6-21.
    Describes Opportunity Zones, the federal economic development program included in the 2017 Tax Cuts and Job Act, to encourage investment and economic growth in economically distressed or disadvantaged communities.
  • "The connected city: A platform for city planners, citizens, and utilities." By Richelle Elberg and Eric Woods. Public Utilities Fortnightly, February 11, 2019, pp. 31-33.
    Describes different applications in the planning or deployment of 4G/5G networks within communities.
  • "Crank up the A/C, crank up the cost: States consider 'surge pricing' for power." By Rebecca Beitsch. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), February 19, 2019, pp. 1-5.
    Reports several states are experimenting with time-of-use pricing, increasing electricity rates during peak hours. Notes critics' concerns about how surge pricing will impact senior citizens and low-income people enrolled in electric bill assistance programs.
  • "Changing tunes?" By Dax Gonzalez. Texas Lone Star (Texas Association of School Boards), January/February 2019, pp. 8-11.
    Examines why the 86th legislative session is expected to be different from the 85th session and how education legislation could be affected. Addresses property taxes, vouchers, special education services, school security, and Hurricane Harvey.
  • "Bypassing the middle man." By Joey Berlin. Texas Medicine, February 2019, pp. 28-31.
    Considers the arguments for and against allowing physicians to dispense medication in their offices. Points out that Texas is one of four states that, for the most part, bans physicians from dispensing medications. Cites SB546, 82nd Legislature, R.S., as past effort to allow physicians to dispense medication.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, February 21

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Track how canceled hearings during the partial federal government shutdown affected the workload of immigration courts. (Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse, Syracuse University, February 19, 2019)
  • Consider ways to address internet privacy and consumer protection related to internet privacy concerns. (U.S. Government Accountability Office, January 2019)
  • See state-by-state legislation intended to streamline the deploy of 5G mobile technology. (National Conference of State Legislatures, February 15, 2019)
  • Read about programs in some states that incorporate professional foster parents into their foster care systems to provide care to special needs children. (Stateline, February 20, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "Texas Enterprise Fund under the microscope." By Daniel Salazar. Austin Business Journal, February 8, 2019, p. 12.
    Highlights recent study that raises transparency concerns regarding the Texas Enterprise Fund, the state's economic development incentive program.
  • "How states use funds under the TANF block grant." By Liz Schott, Ife Floyd, and Ashley Burnside. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Updated February 19, 2019, pp. 1-20.
    Finds states spent only about half of their Temporary Assistance to Needy Families [TANF] funds in fiscal year 2017 on the core welfare reform areas of basic assistance, child care for low-income families, and work supports. Includes several state tables on TANF spending and includes Texas in a discussion of black families' experience with basic assistance.
  • "The labour market: True colours." Economist, February 16th-22nd, 2019, pp. 62-63.
    Explains how occupational segregation affects earnings and the gender pay gap.
  • "The safety-net: The Arkansas experiment." Economist, February 16th-22nd, 2019, pp. 23-24.
    Examines the preliminary results of Arkansas' experiment imposing extensive work requirements on Medicaid recipients. Notes 18,000 people lost their health insurance, due in part to widespread confusion over program requirements and lack of Internet access to submit reports that could only be filed online.
  • "Are states poised to tackle outdated K-12 funding formulas?" By Daarel Burnette II. Education Week, February 13, 2019, pp. 22-23.
    Argues the political climate is right for states to revamp their outdated and inefficient school funding formulas. Highlights the plans of eight states, including Texas, for improving their school funding systems.
  • "Teachers missing out on flood of K-12 cash." By Daarel Burnette II. Education Week, January 23, 2019, pp. 1, 17.
    Addresses states' efforts to fund teacher pay increases and the challenges encountered. Reports funding is often siphoned away to competing priorities at the district level. Highlights recent teacher salary legislation in Texas.
  • "The best cyber offense is a good cyber defense." By Jackie Benton. Fiscal Notes, February 2019, p. 1.
    Examines training of cybersecurity specialists. Notes eighteen colleges and universities in Texas, including The University of Texas at El Paso, The University of Texas at Dallas, and Texas A&M University - San Antonio, have partnered with the National Security Agency to be national centers for cyber defense education.
  • "Texas' public pensions: Growing liabilities could affect state finances." By Spencer Grubbs and Amanda Williams. Fiscal Notes, February 2019, pp. 1, 3-7.
    Examines how government pension plans work in general and compares defined benefit [DB], defined contribution [DC], and hybrid plans, with survey of hybrid retirement plans in other states. Discusses the financial health and funded ratios of the seven statewide public pension systems in Texas, specifically the Teacher Retirement System and Employees Retirement System.
  • "Opportunity Zones: A different zone opportunity." By Diane Lupke. Journal of MultiState Taxation and Incentives, February 2019, pp. 22-23, 44.
    Compares the new federal Opportunity Zones program, established in the 2017 Tax Cuts and Job Act, with previous zone-style programs and investment vehicles. Looks at early investor activity in Opportunity Zones in Louisville, Kentucky, and the state of Indiana.
  • "Pay attention to this little-noticed opioid lawsuit in Oklahoma." By Christine Vestal. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), February 14, 2019, pp. 1-9.
    Highlights Oklahoma lawsuit alleging drug companies misrepresented the benefits and addictive qualities of opioid drugs. Suggests the Oklahoma case, scheduled for trial in May 2019, could precipitate a settlement in the consolidated national lawsuit set for trial in October.
  • "Not all that is lawful is beneficial: The unintended consequences of ignoring legislative intent." By Jack Walker and Reid Martin. Texas Lawyer, March 2019, pp. 20, 22, 24.
    Points out the lack of clarity in the statutory construction of Texas Civil Practice and Remedies Code § 74.153, standards of proof in cases involving emergency medical care, part of the Texas Medical Liability Act. Related information at: http://www.txcourts.gov/media/1443046/170256.pdf.
  • "All together now." By Sean Price. Texas Medicine, February 2019, pp. 22-27.
    Considers how major healthcare mergers, like that proposed by Baylor Scott & White Health and Memorial Hermann, reshape how Texas physicians practice. Asserts that Texas has some of the nation's strictest laws against the corporate practice of medicine, but that the enforcement of these laws has been eroding.
  • "Physician-lawmakers outline priorities for 2019 legislature." By David Doolittle. Texas Medicine, February 2019, pp. 12-13.
    Summarizes topics addressed by Reps. John Zerwas and Tom Oliverson at the Texas Medical Association's Advocacy Retreat, such as better access to mental health care in schools, reducing maternal deaths, and surprise billing.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, February 14

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "Film incentives: Creatives worry rebates could keep shrinking." By Kimberly Reeves. Austin Business Journal, February 8, 2019, p. 6.
    Reviews the history of the Texas Moving Image Industry Incentive program [TMIIIP], noting funds appropriated since 2010. Mentions concerns over HB432, 86th Legislature, which proposes to abolish TMIIIP and the Music, Film, Television, and Multimedia Office in the office of the governor.
  • "Rural hospital closures worry key lawmaker." By Kimberly Reeves. Austin Business Journal, February 1, 2019, p. 6.
    Discusses concerns over access to health care in rural areas. Includes comments by Senator Lois Kolkhorst, chairwoman of the Texas Senate Health and Human Services Committee.
  • "Child support cooperation requirements in SNAP are unproven, costly, and put families at risk." By Elizabeth Wolkomir and Stacy Dean. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, February 7, 2019, pp. 1-15.
    Reviews potential new cooperation requirements between child support and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program [SNAP, formerly food stamps] included in the new farm bill. Notes Texas research showing that more than four in ten mothers who do not receive formal or informal child support are survivors of emotional or physical abuse.
  • "Once a nation of joiners, Americans are now suspicious of those who join." By Henry Gass. Christian Science Monitor, February 4, 2019, pp. 14-15.
    Highlights two recent situations that show misunderstandings and fear of religious associations — objections to Dr. Shahid Shafi serving as vice chair of the Tarrant County Republican Party and questions about whether Brian Buescher, a United States District Court nominee, could separate his views as a member of the Knights of Columbus from his decision-making on the bench.
  • "Texas town pioneers ways to fight decline of rural high schools." By Henry Gass. Christian Science Monitor, February 4, 2019, p. 13.
    Highlights the early college and STEM programs that Roscoe Independent School District has incorporated into its educational offerings to keep the small rural school district viable and to give their students opportunities beyond graduation.
  • "Banishing blasphemy." By Rob Boston. Church & State, February 2019, pp. 10-13.
    Examines the history of blasphemy laws in America and Europe, noting many countries have repealed or are trying to repeal these laws. Points out attempts by several American states to revive blasphemy laws.
  • "Global trade: Gaming the rules." Economist, February 2nd-8th, 2019, pp. 60-61.
    Reports on the World Trade Organization's plans to negotiate new rules covering trade-related aspects of electronic commerce. Notes conflicts in how different countries define and govern e-commerce.
  • "Opioid prescribing rates in nonmetropolitan and metropolitan counties among primary care providers using an electronic health record system — United States, 2014–2017." By Macarena C. Garcia, et alInternet Resource, January 18, 2019, pp. 1-6.
    Reports that the percentage of patients prescribed an opioid was higher in rural than in urban areas in a 2014-2017 reporting period. Recommends tailoring community health care practices and intervention programs to community characteristics.
  • "Will state waivers save, reform, or sabotage Obamacare?" By Stuart M. Butler. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), February 5, 2019, pp. 441-442.
    Considers the possible effects of new guidance from the Trump administration to states on how they can use Section 1332 of the Affordable Care Act [ACA] to develop waivers. Asserts that Section 1332 allows states to make significant modifications to the ACA without new laws altering the act.
  • "In the eye of the law." By Louis Menand. New Yorker, February 4, 2019, pp. 18-22.
    Explores the history of racial discrimination and interpretation of the Fourteenth Amendment through an examination of the United States Supreme Court opinion, Plessy v. Ferguson. Compares Steve Luxenberg's book, Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation with other books highlighting this case.
  • "Reliability means business." By Alex Hofmann. Public Power, January/February 2019, p. 39.
    Lists metrics a public power utility should be able to articulate regarding the reliability of their system. Includes Austin Energy as an example.
  • "TPPA [Texas Public Power Association] members collaborate with PUC [Public Utilities Commission] on summer planning." Texas Public Power, January 2019, pp. 4-5.
    Reports on the current work of the Texas Public Power Association in anticipation of electric energy demand for the upcoming summer.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

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