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Current Articles & Research Resources, July 9

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Review which activities pose more or less risk of contracting COVID-19. (Texas Medical Association, updated July 8, 2020)
  • Explore resources related to mental health and accessing mental health services. (Texas Health and Human Services, accessed July 8, 2020)
  • Read about how genes influence the human body's responses to physical activity. (National Institutes of Health, July 2020)
  • Examine the recently adjusted economic outlook for 2020-2030. (Congressional Budget Office, July 2, 2020)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • 20.07.12 / "The value of Medicaid managed care: States transition to managed care." America's Health Insurance Plans, June 2020, pp. 1-8.
    Discusses the growth of managed care, or capitated arrangements, within state Medicaid programs between federal fiscal years 2010 and 2018. Compares the percent spent on capitation payments, fee-for-services expenditures, and special payments during 2010 and 2018 by state. Considers briefly COVID-19's impact on Medicaid managed care.
  • 20.07.13 / "What's actually in the Trump executive order on child welfare." By John Kelly. Chronicle of Social Change, June 24, 2020, pp. 1-5.
    Presents an overview of the issues addressed in President Donald Trump's executive order of June 24, 2020, on the child welfare system, including kinship care, aging out of foster care, quality legal representation, data on foster families, reasonable efforts reviews, and risk assessment.
  • 20.07.14 / "It's messing with Texas." Economist, July 4th-10th, 2020, pp. 1-2.
    Discusses Governor Greg Abbott's balancing act in managing the state's response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • 20.07.15 / "Property in America: The house wins." Economist, July 4th-10th, 2020, pp. 1-2.
    Explains why the American housing market is not experiencing the usual declines seen during recessions. Notes the rate of foreclosures looks unlikely to reach the heights hit during the 2007-2009 recession.
  • 20.07.16 / "50-state comparison: 529 education savings plans." By Adrienne Fischer, et al. Education Commission of the States, June 15, 2020, pp. 1-5.
    Compares states' policies and activities related to 529 education savings plans with a focus on contributions, withdrawals, and eligible expenses. Includes individual Texas state profile.
  • 20.07.17 / "Toward reopening: What will school look like this fall?" By Christopher Cleveland. Education Next, June 29, 2020, pp. 1-4.
    Highlights guidance plans for reopening schools safely during the COVID-19 pandemic in Arizona, California, Florida, Massachusetts, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington. Focuses on a variety of areas including class size and school scheduling, finance, health screenings and masks, priority populations for in-person instruction, technology, and transportation.
  • 20.07.18 / "Finding policy responses to rising intimate partner violence during the coronavirus outbreak." By Amrutha Ramaswamy, Usha Ranji, and Alina Salganicoff. Issue Brief (Kaiser Family Foundation), June 11, 2020, pp. 1-3.
    Highlights policies and programs that consider the needs of intimate partner violence [IPV] survivors and support organizations during the COVID-19 pandemic, including the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security [CARES] Act, the Heroes Act, telehealth care, and employer-based paid safe leave.
  • 20.07.19 / "America's children: Responding to the crisis now with the future in mind." By Quianta Moore and Christopher Greeley. Issue Brief (Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy), June 30, 2020, pp. 1-8.
    Offers recommendations for policies and practices that would bolster family well-being during stable economic and societal times. Suggests the incorporation of a disaster-readiness plan to mitigate potential harm to families, including the negative impact on child brain development and parental stress caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • 20.07.20 / "After COVID-19: Thinking differently about running the health care system." By Stuart M. Butler. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), June 23/30, 2020, pp. 2450-2451.
    Highlights several strategies that should continue to be employed in running the health care system after the COVID-19 pandemic, including using waivers to boost federalism, reconsidering the role of hospitals and other institutions as hubs for care, expanding the use of telehealth, and bringing together funds from multiple programs to improve the delivery of health care and health-related services.
  • 20.07.21 / "The path to better policing." By Robert VerBruggen. National Review, July 6, 2020, pp. 15-17.
    Explores specific reforms at the federal, state, and local levels that could improve policing. Highlights more effective crime-fighting strategies that could lead to improved safety in communities. Suggests supporting, but also holding accountable, all police officers.
  • 20.07.22 / "The politicization of disaster relief." By Steven Horwitz and E. Frank Stephenson. Regulation (CATO Institute), Summer 2020, pp. 4-5.
    Provides a brief overview of research that finds political considerations influence the allocation of aid during crises.
  • 20.07.23 / "The highs and lows of Texas taxes." Research Report (Texas Taxpayers and Research Association), June 2020, pp. 1-4.
    Discusses the difference in individual and business tax burdens in Texas.
  • 20.07.24 / "Weathering the storm: Code, compliance, cost." By Kristin Allman. Texas Builder, July/August 2020, pp. 12-16.
    Examines the effectiveness of building codes in protecting homes from hurricane-strength winds and extreme flooding in Hurricanes Rita, Ike, and Harvey. Chronicles the history and enforcement of the International Residential Code and International Building Code in Texas.
  • 20.07.25 / "The tele-future is now." By Joey Berlin. Texas Medicine, July 2020, pp. 15-19.
    Examines the use of telemedicine by Texas doctors during the COVID-19 pandemic, including transitioning to remote visits, positive patient outcomes, and issues with technology. Discusses the coverage parity for telemedicine achieved by SB1107, 85th Legislature, R.S., and the need to make payment parity permanent in the future.
  • 20.07.26 / "Why Texas still celebrates Confederate Heroes Day." By Emily McCullar. Texas Monthly, July 3, 2020, pp. 1-4.
    Discusses the history of Confederate Heroes Day in Texas, its origins within the 63rd Regular Session (1973), and Representative Senfronia Thompson's efforts at the time to make Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday an honorary holiday (HB118, 63rd Legislature, R.S.). Highlights Representative Jarvis Johnson's recent attempt to remove the holiday from the state calendar (HB1183, 86th Legislature). Mentions Representative James White and Representative Donna Howard.
  • 20.07.27 / "How Texas lawmakers and industry and weakened citizens' rights to fight pollution." By Christopher Collins. Texas Observer, July 2, 2020, pp. 1-8.
    Details legislation that has changed the environmental permitting process in Texas in favor of industry by limiting public participation and opposition. Addresses legislation authored by Representative Geanie Morrison, Representative Kyle Kacal, and former Senator Craig Estes.
  • 20.07.28 / "Punished for being poor: The relationship between poverty and neglect in Texas." By Nikki Pressley. Texas Public Policy Foundation, June 2020, pp. 1-8.
    Examines poverty and neglect in Texas families that interact with the child welfare system. Finds 75 percent of children entering the system are victims of neglect only. Argues the statutory definition of neglect should be narrowed and families experiencing poverty should be connected with community-based services rather than be punished for economic hardship.
  • 20.07.29 / "New report confirms babies of color face severe inequities even before birth." ZERO TO THREE, June 11, 2020, pp. 1-5.
    Highlights State of Babies Yearbook: 2020, a new ZERO TO THREE report with state-by-state data and rankings on the health and well-being of America's babies, and the related brief, Maternal and Child Health Inequities Emerge Before Birth. The State of Babies Yearbook: 2020 includes a Texas state profile measuring progress on indicators of good health, strong families, and positive early learning experiences for children ages zero to three.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, July 2

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Track reopening strategies by state. (National Governors Association, accessed July 1, 2020)
  • Review an annual survey of hospitals in the United States. (American Hospital Association, updated March 2020)
  • Explore recent data and statistics related to diabetes. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2020)
  • Consider national and global efforts to prevent human trafficking. (U.S. Department of State, June 2020)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • 20.07.01 / "Medicaid financing: Dangers of block grants and per capita caps." By Suzanne Wikle. Center for Law and Social Policy, June 2020, pp. 1-11.
    Discusses guidance issued by the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services [CMS] in January 2020 encouraging states to apply for waiver authority to implement per capita caps and block grants in Medicaid. Outlines five concerns with these potential changes to the Medicaid financing structure. Mentions Texas.
  • 20.07.02 / "State borrowing no substitute for additional direct aid to help states weather COVID downturn." By Michael Mazerov and Elizabeth McNicol. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, June 29, 2020, pp. 1-12.
    Describes why significant borrowing on the part of states, beyond short-term loans to help with cash flow, is not a viable or legally permissible strategy to close states' deep budget gaps stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic. Discusses the potential implications of state borrowing on Medicaid, K-12 education, higher education, infrastructure, and unemployment insurance.
  • 20.07.03 / "Drug testing the whole family: Abilene's wide net yields record-high foster care removals." By Roxanna Asgarian. Chronicle of Social Change, June 21, 2020, p. 1.
    Examines the increased role of drug testing in foster care cases in Taylor County, Texas. Quotes Representative James Frank.
  • 20.07.04 / "7 issues facing K-12 budgets as COVID-shocked legislatures reconvene." By Daarel Burnette II. Education Week, June 10, 2020, p. 9.
    Discusses the economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on school finance. Explains that state legislatures will have to address these issues in upcoming legislative sessions.
  • 20.07.05 / "The world economy needs a stimulus." By Alexander Main, Didier Jacobs, and Mark Weisbrot. Issue Brief (Center for Ecomomic and Policy Research), June 2020, pp. 1-16.
    Explains how international reserve assets known as Special Drawing Rights [SDRs] work and their potential role in containing the COVID-19 pandemic and stabilizing the world economy. Looks at the benefits of SDRs for the United States and addresses counter-arguments.
  • 20.07.06 / "A majority of workers are fearful of coronavirus infections at work, especially Black, Hispanic, and low- and middle-income workers." By Peter Dorman and Lawrence Mishel. Policy Report (Economic Policy Institute), June 16, 2020, pp. 1-7.
    Reports that vulnerable workers are not receiving extra compensation or safety protections proportionate to the risks they are being exposed to at their workplaces.
  • 20.07.07 / "The power of a clean slate." By J.J. Prescott and Sonja B. Starr. Regulation (CATO Institute), Summer 2020, pp. 28-34.
    Examines how expungement works for those who are eligible and the relationship between expungement and important outcomes such as recidivism risk and employment success. Summarizes a recent article by the authors studying expungement in Michigan.
  • 20.07.08 / "COVID-19 adds a new snag to the 2020 Census count of Native Americans." By Colleen Connolly. Smithsonian Magazine, June 23, 2020, pp. 1-7.
    Provides a brief history of how Native Americans have been undercounted since the first United States census of 1790. Points out that COVID-19 may contribute to or exacerbate an undercount of Native Americans for the 2020 Census.
  • 20.07.09 / "Community health centers excluded from federal coronavirus aid." By Michael Ollove. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), June 22, 2020, pp. 1-4.
    Reports federal funding rules exclude community health centers from receiving coronavirus-related aid even though one in five Medicaid beneficiaries and uninsured individuals receive care at community health centers.
  • 20.07.10 / "COVID-19 lawsuit immunity: When nobody is accountable, nobody is safe." By Quentin Brogdon. Texas Lawyer, June 25, 2020, pp. 1-4.
    Explains why Texas should not join the states that have granted COVID-19 liability protections to businesses, corporations, health care providers, and nursing homes.
  • 20.07.11 / "What police spending data can (and cannot) explain amid calls to defund the police." By Richard C. Auxier. Urban Wire, June 9, 2020, pp. 1-8.
    Estimates state and local government spending on police in 2017, the latest year for which comprehensive data were available.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, June 25

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Search recent law enforcement legislation across all 50 states. (National Conference of State Legislatures, June 23, 2020)
  • Read about how the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act could affect poverty levels. (Center on Poverty and Social Policy at Columbia University, June 21, 2020)
  • Review statistics on heat-related deaths in the United States. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, June 19, 2020)
  • Explore law enforcement identification issues and federal legislation. (Congressional Research Service, June 23, 2020)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • 20.06.48 / "Extended: A review of the current and proposed duration of 'pandemic' unemployment benefits." By Matt Weidinger. American Enterprise Institute, June 2020, pp. 1-23.
    Compares prior federal emergency unemployment benefit programs — programs that extend unemployment insurance [UI] benefits to individuals who have exhausted state benefits. Discusses the extraordinary extended benefits paid during the Great Recession, current law in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and major proposals to extend and expand these benefits.
  • 20.06.49 / "The case for boosting SNAP benefits in next major economic response package." By Dorothy Rosenbaum, Stacy Dean, and Zoë Neuberger. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Updated May 22, 2020, pp. 1-19.
    Discusses the benefits of using increases to the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program [SNAP] as an economic stimulus during the COVID-19 pandemic. Includes 50-state tables of the estimated increase by state in total SNAP benefits in fiscal years 2020 and 2021 from a 15 percent increase in maximum SNAP benefits, as well as the average monthly SNAP payment.
  • 20.06.50 / "As lockdown lingers, a rural reckoning with domestic violence." By Moira Donovan and Sara Miller Llana. Christian Science Monitor, June 15, 2020, pp. 1-7.
    Explores the increased risks of domestic violence that rural communities face because of isolation and a lack of resources. Looks at Texas and Canada as examples and notes the risks are magnified by the COVID-19 pandemic. Explains new resources such as improved telehealth may offer long-term solutions.
  • 20.06.51 / "Shaky COVID response lays bare a decadeslong crisis in government." By Linda Feldmann. Christian Science Monitor, June 15, 2020, pp. 1-10.
    Examines how the COVID-19 emergency has exposed the shortcomings in America's current, highly-politicized, complex, and decentralized system of government that encourages short-term thinking and "dysfunction in budget-setting." Suggests this is an opportunity to consider reforming government to better meet public needs.
  • 20.06.52 / "Texas failing to keep youth in foster care safe." By Roxanna Asgarian. Chronicle of Social Change, June 16, 2020, pp. 1-4.
    Discusses the June 16 report of the special monitors evaluating Texas' foster care system. Notes the report's finding that eleven children died in the care of the state between July 31, 2019 and April 30, 2020.
  • 20.06.53 / "The California business exodus: COVID-19 could accelerate relocations to DFW." By Mark Calvey. Dallas Business Journal, June 19, 2020, pp. 10-11.
    Points out California companies that are considering corporate relocation due in part to the pandemic's economic impact and to expensive state government mandates. Includes a sidebar on California legislation related to a rent moratorium for small businesses.
  • 20.06.54 / "This entrepreneur wants to change the way we handle traffic stops." By Brian Womack. Dallas Business Journal, June 16, 2020, pp. 1-2.
    Discusses the development of a smartphone application that modernizes the traffic stop process and is designed to prevent confrontational interactions between drivers and police.
  • 20.06.55 / "The pandemic and state finances: The state budget train-crash." Economist, June 20th-26th, 2020, pp. 1-4.
    Reports the collapse of state tax revenues and state rules mandating balanced budgets will result in big spending cuts to public services in the midst of a pandemic and a recession.
  • 20.06.56 / "Death by lethal instruction." By Drew M. Padley. Houston Law Review, Spring 2020, pp. 1101-1133 (Note Length).
    Examines jury instructions in capital sentencing trials, including the history of the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure, Art. 37.071, issues with the 12-10 rule and the gag rule, and the effect on verdicts in Texas death penalty cases. Discusses recent attempts at legislative reform and the unlikeliness of a judicial solution. Mentions Representative Abel Herrero, Representative Joe Moody, Representative Armando Walle, and Senator Eddie Lucio, Jr.
  • 20.06.57 / "Austerity, subsistence, or investment: Will Congress and the president choose to bail out our children's future?" By Frank Adamson, Allison Brown, and Kevin G. Welner. National Education Policy Center, June 4, 2020, pp. 1-16.
    Argues policymakers should resist austerity and subsistence measures during the current economic crisis driven by the COVID-19 pandemic and instead provide stimulus investment in public schools.
  • 20.06.58 / "What the masks mean." By Michael Brendan Dougherty. National Review, June 22, 2020, pp. 18-19.
    Considers the various views on mask-wearing brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. Discusses the daigou shoppers [surrogate shopping] phenomenon, which exhausted the mask supply early in the pandemic. Scrutinizes the role mask-shaming plays in our current American society.
  • 20.06.59 / "The once and future grid: Investing in the smart grid." By Zolaikha Strong. Public Utilities Fortnightly, June 1, 2020, pp. 1-3.
    Argues for the continuing need to invest in the electric grid. Provides several reasons explaining why this is important, including protecting employees during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • 20.06.60 / "Do charter schools harm traditional public schools? Years of test-score data suggest they don't." By Marcus A. Winters. Report (Manhattan Institute), June 2020, pp. 1-10.
    Examines whether competition from charter schools leads to lower student outcomes within traditional public schools.
  • 20.06.61 / "Nearly half of coronavirus spread may be traced to people without any symptoms." By Alice Park. Time, June 5, 2020, pp. 1-6.
    Details results from a study conducted by Scripps Translational Science Institute on the asymptomatic spread of COVID-19. Includes discussion of widespread testing, face masks, and findings that some asymptomatic people are presenting lung damage typical of the coronavirus infection.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, June 18

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Read about redistricting systems by state. (National Conference of State Legislatures, June 2, 2020)
  • Explore ways to disinfect surfaces and trim in your car without causing damage. (Consumer Reports, March 14, 2020)
  • Consider how the COVID-19 pandemic will drive more consumers to Medicaid. (Stateline, June 16, 2020)
  • Review Governor Abbott's extension of emergency SNAP benefits through June. (Office of the Texas Governor, June 4, 2020)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • 20.06.36 / "Fairness, transparency, and accountability: Where are they in the Texas oil and gas condemnation process?" By Jackson R. Willingham. Baylor Law Review, Winter 2020, pp. 212-232.
    Discusses the ability of private oil and gas companies to acquire eminent domain authority and the condemnation process. Illustrates the imbalance of negotiating power between landowners and pipeline companies and the inadequacy of judicial remedies. Offers solutions to increase fairness, transparency, and accountability within the process.
  • 20.06.37 / "Aggressive state outreach can help reach the 12 million non-filers eligible for stimulus payments." By Chuck Marr, et al. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Updated June 16, 2020, pp. 1-20.
    Argues that governors and state health and human services agencies, through the administration of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program [SNAP] and Medicaid programs, are uniquely positioned to reach 12 million Americans eligible for the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security [CARES] Act stimulus payment, which must be claimed by October 15. Estimates Texas has 685,000 total individuals missed by automatic stimulus payments who receive SNAP and/or Medicaid benefits.
  • 20.06.38 / "States are using the CARES Act to improve child care access during COVID-19." By Elizabeth Bedrick and Sarah Dally. Child Trends, June 2020, pp. 1-6.
    Illustrates how states are using emergency funding from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security [CARES] Act to mitigate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on child care providers. Highlights state strategies to improve child care affordability, increase salaries of child care workers, provide emergency child care to essential workers, and waive portions of child care tuition.
  • 20.06.39 / "The case for microbonds." By Gordon Feller. City Journal (Manhattan Institute), June 8, 2020, pp. 1-4.
    Suggests the current urban-financing crisis spurred by the COVID-19 pandemic could make microbonds a serious alternative to traditional municipal bonds and another financing option for cities to achieve a sustainable fiscal recovery.
  • 20.06.40 / "The shifting ground." Economist, June 13th-19th, 2020, pp. 1-2.
    Discusses the shift in law enforcement policies brought about by the death of George Floyd. Highlights police reforms suggested by Congress, cities, and states to make police officers more accountable.
  • 20.06.41 / "Long-run changes in underrepresentation after affirmative action bans in public universities." By Mark C. Long and Nicole A. Bateman. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, June 2020, pp. 188-207.
    Assesses the changes in the racial and ethnic makeup of universities in California, Florida, and Texas since race-based affirmative action was eliminated. Concludes the persistent decline in minority admittance and enrollment indicates that the alternative measures implemented by administrators and policymakers haven't successfully replaced affirmative action.
  • 20.06.42 / "A road map to recreational marijuana taxation." By Ulrik Boesen. Fiscal Fact (Tax Foundation), June 2020, pp. 1-39 (Note Length).
    Provides background on the marijuana plant and the market for recreational marijuana, valued between $11 billion and $13.7 billion in 2019. Analyzes current marijuana excise tax structures in Alaska, California, Colorado, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington, and includes detailed tax design strategies for states.
  • 20.06.43 / "Trade policy under a Biden administration." By Simon Lester. Free Trade Bulletin (Cato Institute), June 9, 2020, pp. 1-6.
    Presents an overview of the trade issues Joe Biden would likely face if he wins the 2020 presidential election. Offers practical suggestions for developing a coherent trade policy that provides stability and certainty.
  • 20.06.44 / "Balancing rights in a new energy era: Will the mineral estate's dominance continue?" By Meredith A. Wegener. Houston Law Review, Spring 2020, pp. 1037-1082 (Note Length).
    Describes the dominant mineral estate doctrine, its protection of subsurface property rights to fuel oil and gas production, and how it has been modified through the accommodation doctrine. Examines the express and implied rights that the doctrine impacts, including surface property rights, wind and solar rights, and environmental rights. Discusses the future of the doctrine in light of the movement to rely less on fossil fuels and transition to renewable energy sources.
  • 20.06.45 / "Litigation challenging mandatory stay at home and other social distancing measures." By Laurie Sobel and MaryBeth Musumeci. Issue Brief (Kaiser Family Foundation), June 5, 2020, pp. 1-10.
    Highlights lawsuits challenging social distancing measures that have been adopted to limit the spread of COVID-19, including challenges to restrictions on peaceful assembly, travel, and religious services. Includes a map documenting the adoption of different social distancing measures by state.
  • 20.06.46 / "Sustaining rural hospitals after COVID-19: The case for global budgets." By Jonathan E. Fried, David T. Liebers, and Eric T. Roberts. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), June 10, 2020, pp. 1-5.
    Argues global budgets may be an option for sustaining rural hospitals after the COVID-19 pandemic. Discusses how Maryland and Pennsylvania operate under this model, and provides considerations for policymakers in its implementation.
  • 20.06.47 / "The difficult path to state bankruptcy." By Veronique de Rugy and Todd J. Zywicki. Policy Brief (Mercatus Center, George Mason University), June 10, 2020, pp. 1-10.
    Highlights the conditions and reforms that should be achieved before expanding Chapter 9 of the United States Bankruptcy Code to state governments. Considers whether state bankruptcy presents a better alternative than state bailouts or debt repudiation.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, June 11

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Review safe practices for cleaning and disinfecting high-touch surfaces. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2020)
  • Read about the demographics of the U.S. Armed Forces veterans. (U.S. Census Bureau, June 2, 2020)
  • Get a current list of labs across the country that can test for lead in drinking water. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, March 2020)
  • Consider recent proposals in Congress related to police reform. (Congressional Research Service, June 9, 2020)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • 20.06.16 / "How microbes write history." By Charles C. Mann. Atlantic Monthly, June 2020, pp. 14-17.
    Considers how the world is changed by disease outbreaks and pandemics, such as the long-term aftereffects on health and economics from the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic or the bubonic plague of the 1300s. Revisits Hong Kong's collective community action in 2003 that halted the severe acute respiratory syndrome [SARS] epidemic.
  • 20.06.17 / "Classrooms of the future arrive early." By Will Anderson. Austin Business Journal, June 5, 2020, pp. 4, 6, 8.
    Examines how COVID-19 has disrupted the traditional higher education model. Reports the future of higher education promises to be digital, decentralized, and more focused on preparing students to meet employers' needs.
  • 20.06.18 / "The impact of the COVID19 recession on the jobs and incomes of persons of color." By Jared Bernstein and Janelle Jones. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, June 2, 2020, pp. 1-20.
    Presents a historical analysis of economic wellbeing indicators in past downturns, including race and ethnicity, educational attainment, employment and unemployment rates, annual income and earnings, and labor market mobility. Forecasts the potential effects on African American and Hispanic employment and income in the current COVID-19 pandemic.
  • 20.06.19 / "Despite furor, accountability lags for police. Here's why it might change." By Patrik Jonsson and Henry Gass. Christian Science Monitor, May 29, 2020, pp. 1-8.
    Discusses police accountability for on-duty deaths, such as that of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Explains the difficulties of police officers' jobs and the public's expectation for them to be "hard on crime, but also respect everyone's rights."
  • 20.06.20 / "While child abuse call centers grew quiet, helpline requests surged." By Nadra Nittle and John Kelly. Chronicle of Social Change, May 27, 2020, pp. 1-9.
    Discusses the decline in calls to child abuse and neglect hotlines amid school closures and shelter-in-place orders due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Notes hotline calls in Texas decreased by 25 percent in April 2020 when compared to the same month from the previous year, down to 23,000 calls.
  • 20.06.21 / "What can we learn from the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918-19 for COVID-19?" By David C. Wheelock. Economic Synopses (Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis), May 18, 2020, pp. 1-4.
    Suggests the pandemics of the past can provide useful data points to help forecast how the COVID-19 pandemic and future pandemics are likely to play out.
  • 20.06.22 / "Texas telemedicine's COVID-19 response reveals health care's future." By Jackie Benton. Fiscal Notes, May 2020, pp. 1-4.
    Highlights the expansion of telemedicine, telehealth, and telemonitoring programs during the COVID-19 pandemic through an emergency rule adopted by the Texas Department of Insurance. Includes perspectives on telemedicine from Ascension Medical Group Texas and the Texas Hospital Association.
  • 20.06.23 / "Implications of Texas SB 1882 patchwork of partnerships." By Chloe Latham Sikes. IDRA Newsletter (Intercultural Development Research Association), May 2020, pp. 5-6, 8.
    Argues SB1882, 85th Legislature, R.S., invites privately-managed charter organizations to operate public schools and that new rules adopted by the Texas Education Agency grant these organizations even further control over public school campuses.
  • 20.06.24 / "Eligibility for affordable health insurance options for Texans following job loss due to COVID-19." By Shao-Chee Sim and Elena M. Marks. Issue Brief (Episcopal Health Foundation), May 2020, pp. 1-4.
    Estimates the percentage of Texans eligible for Medicaid or subsidized Affordable Care Act [ACA] Marketplace coverage now and in 2021 following job loss between March 1 and May 2, 2020. Finds the number of Texans falling into the coverage gap, those without access to affordable health care coverage, will grow by 50 percent over the year.
  • 20.06.25 / "How would low-income communities prioritize Medicaid spending?" By C. Daniel Myers, et al. Journal of Health Politics, Policy, and Law, June 2020, pp. 373-418 (Note Length).
    Studies the priorities for Medicaid spending by low-income, medically underserved communities. Finds participants in the study preferred broad eligibility consistent with Medicaid expansion and spending in historically underfunded areas. Argues the most affected communities should be involved in the policymaking process.
  • 20.06.26 / "How laid-off and furloughed employees can keep their health coverage." By David Kendall. Memo (Third Way), May 6, 2020, pp. 1-5.
    Explains measures that Congress can take to ensure stability and security for individuals who have lost employer-provided health insurance due to the coronavirus pandemic.
  • 20.06.27 / "Health care: 'A momenet of ethical reckoning'." By Zoë Carpenter. Nation, June 15/22, 2020, pp. 13-15, 19.
    Describes how COVID-19 disproportionately affects people of color, blue collar essential workers, and the poor, and discusses an underlying system of health care disparities.
  • 20.06.28 / "States of distress." By Ramesh Ponnuru. National Review, June 1, 2020, pp. 14-16.
    Explains the COVID-19 pandemic has renewed questions about federalism and the interaction of the federal government with states.
  • 20.06.29 / "The economic significance of the Permian Basin" By M. Ray Perryman. Perryman Report and Texas Letter, Vol. 37, No. 5, pp. 1-7.
    Highlights the importance of the Permian Basin's oil and gas production to the Texas and national economies.
  • 20.06.30 / "Advanced opportunities: How Idaho is reshaping high schools by empowering students." By Max Eden. Report (Manhattan Institute), May 26, 2020, pp. 1-16.
    Brings Idaho's Advanced Opportunities initiative to the attention of state policymakers in other states. Describes the program as a model to improve the quality of high school instruction, decrease the cost of college, and help students who are not college-bound graduate high school with a professional skill.
  • 20.06.31 / "So you got a PPP loan. Now what?" By Will Anderson. San Antonio Business Journal, May 19, 2020, pp. 1-3.
    Highlights the importance of the Permian Basin's oil and gas production to the Texas and national economies.
  • 20.06.32 / "The timely return of the drive-in restaurant." By Laura Kiniry. Smithsonian Magazine, May 27, 2020, pp. 1-3.
    Reports on the revival of drive-ins and carhop services as an option that some restaurants are turning to in order to stay open while complying with COVID-19-related mandates.
  • 20.06.33 / "Buying more time." By Joey Berlin. Texas Medicine, June 2020, pp. 30-32.
    Highlights the recent decision by the Texas Comptroller to delay the tax on medical billing services until October 2021 so a legislative fix can be sought. Discusses the impact of the tax on smaller medical practices.
  • 20.06.34 / "Growing residents." By Sean Price. Texas Medicine, June 2020, pp. 42-45.
    Describes the increase in medical school residency positions due to the new collaboration between Texas Christian University and the University of North Texas Health Science Center. Examines efforts by state lawmakers to reduce the physician shortage through requirements for new public medical schools, SB1066, 85th Legislature, R.S., and increased funding. Discusses the effect the COVID-19 pandemic could have on the progress made within graduate medical education [GME].
  • 20.06.35 / "'We don't exist': Texas domestic workers fight for inclusion in labor laws." By Acacia Coronado. Texas Observer, May 27, 2020, pp. 1-17.
    Addresses efforts to establish labor protections and health care benefits for domestic workers in Texas. Argues the COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated a further need for more inclusive Texas labor laws.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

 

Current Articles & Research Resources, June 4

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Read about how small rural businesses have struggled with getting help through the Paycheck Protection Program. (Stateline, June 1, 2020)
  • Review details about the unemployment benefits 13-week extension in Texas. (Texas Workforce Commission, June 2, 2020)
  • Consider how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting the child care industry. (The Council of State Governments, June 2, 2020)
  • Explore an FAQ about renewing driver's licenses by appointment. (Texas Department of Public Safety, May 26, 2020)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • 20.06.01 / "How changes to the 2020 Census timeline will impact redistricting." By Yurij Rudensky, Michael Li, and Annie Lo. Brennan Center for Justice, May 4, 2020, pp. 1-26 (Note Length).
    Examines redistricting deadlines states will need to adjust due to the delay in the 2020 Census and how these changes will impact state and federal elections in 2021 and 2022. Includes state-by-state assessments.
  • 20.06.02 / "Maintaining legislative continuity through emergencies." By Victoria Bassetti and Daniel I. Weiner. Brennan Center for Justice, May 20, 2020, pp. 1-18.
    Discusses why it's vital legislatures remain fully engaged during crises like the COVID-19 pandemic, including their role in maintaining state appropriations, continuing essential government functions and emergency responses, and oversight of the executive branch. Provides recommendations on how to alter legislative procedures and rules.
  • 20.06.03 / "Family First Act: Why outcomes oriented contracting should be part of the plan." By Debra Solomon. Chronicle of Social Change, May 20, 2020, pp. 1-2.
    Discusses contract considerations for state and county child welfare agencies in implementing the Family First Prevention Services Act (H.R. 1892, 115th Congress, Title VII).
  • 20.06.04 / "Tsunami of bankruptcies threatens Texas." By Mark Curriden. Dallas Business Journal, May 22, 2020, pp. 14-16.
    Reports a 133 percent increase in Chapter 11 bankruptcy filings by Texas companies between January 1 and May 5, compared to the same period in 2019. Expects a surge of restructurings in the retail, energy, hospitality, and healthcare sectors.
  • 20.06.05 / "Eye of the hurricane: America Inc faces a wave of bankruptcies." Economist, May 16th-22nd, 2020, pp. 51-53.
    Describes early-warning signs that might reveal the scale of the coming wave of bankruptcies. Considers whether there are alternatives to outright bankruptcy.
  • 20.06.06 / "College blues: Could a fifth of America's colleges really face the chop?" Economist, May 30th-June 5th, 2020, pp. 1-3.
    Suggests COVID-19 is likely to accelerate the closure of small colleges struggling with declining enrollment and budget deficits.
  • 20.06.07 / "Pandemic drives record unemployment: Texas Workforce Commission flooded with claims." By Peggy Fikac and David Green. Fiscal Notes, May 2020, pp. 1, 3.
    Describes the record increase in unemployment insurance claims due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the Texas Workforce Commission's response.
  • 20.06.08 / "Recessions and revenues: Perspectives on the downturn." By Courtney King, Chris Dittmar, and JoJo Estrada. Fiscal Notes, May 2020, pp. 4-13.
    Examines the early stages of the recession and economic challenges relating to the COVID-19 pandemic, including unemployment, travel, oil prices, and tax revenue. Presents a historical analysis of the year-over-year change in sales and use tax revenue, motor vehicle sales and rental taxes, motor fuels taxes, oil and natural gas production taxes, and hotel occupancy taxes.
  • 20.06.09 / "Holding up half the sky: Mothers as workers, primary caregivers, & breadwinners during COVID-19." By Elyse Shaw, et al. Institute for Women's Policy Research, May 2020, pp. 1-12.
    Highlights the need for targeted programs, policies, and interventions that put the needs of breadwinner mothers at the forefront of COVID-19 recovery efforts.
  • 20.06.10 / "Digital smartphone tracking for COVID-19: Public health and civil liberties in tension." By I. Glenn Cohen, Lawrence O. Gostin, and Daniel J. Weitzner. JAMA (Journal of the American Medial Association), May 27, 2020, pp. 1-5.
    Compares manual tracing to digital tracking and user-controlled approaches to a centralized strategy in relation to contact investigations for COVID-19. Discusses balancing public health strategies with individual privacy.
  • 20.06.11 / "The short-term outlook for the Texas economy." By M/ Ray Perryman. Perryman Report and Texas Letter, Vol. 37, No. 4, pp. 1-3, 6.
    Forecasts a significant drop in state business activity in 2020 due to COVID-19 and the contraction in the energy sector. Expects a return to economic growth in 2021.
  • 20.06.12 / "Outlook for the Texas economy." By Luis B. Torres, et al. Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University, May 20, 2020, pp. 1-34 (Note Length).
    Details key state economic indicators and trends in housing, energy, employment, manufacturing, construction, services, and trade, with data current as of May 18, 2020. Accounts for the initial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, reflecting the economy through March 2020.
  • 20.06.13 / "This disaster season, 'everything is complicated by COVID-19'." By Alex Brown. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), May 28, 2020, pp. 1-8.
    Reports the coronavirus is likely to upend nearly every plan in the disaster response playbook, complicating the jobs of emergency management personnel.
  • 20.06.14 / "Can the 'Texas Miracle' survive?" By Christopher Hooks. Texas Monthly, June 2020, pp. 1-5.
    Examines how the Texas economy, with its unique regulatory and political system, will fare during a recession caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Includes discussion of the role of the Texas Legislature, recent legislation that has affected the state budget, including HB3, 86th Legislature, and the upcoming election.
  • 20.06.15 / "The Permian Basin: Enriching Texas: A study of the financial contributions of the Permian Basin to the Texas State Treasury through the years 2014-2019." Texas Taxpayers and Research Association, Spring 2020 (released May 26, 2020), pp. 1-18.
    Presents a special report for the Permian Basin Petroleum Association detailing the oil and gas industry as the economic engine of the Permian Basin and the region's financial contributions to state and local governments through oil and gas taxes and royalties.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, May 28

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Review recommended health protocols for voters and election sites in Texas. (Texas Secretary of State, May 26, 2020)
  • Read about how the pandemic may affect higher education spending and funding. (Pew Charitable Trusts, May 18, 2020)
  • Search revenue and expenditures by category or state agency. (Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, accessed May 27, 2020)
  • Find out which Texas parks are accessible and open for day use. (Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, updated May 26, 2020)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • 20.05.44 / "Accessing the vote during a pandemic." By Christopher Thomas and Matthew Weil. Bipartisan Policy Center, May 2020, pp. 1-11.
    Discusses issues state and local election administrators should consider during the COVID-19 pandemic for both the remaining primary elections and the November general election. Addresses voting by mail and absentee voting.
  • 20.05.45 / "Unemployment compensation: A guide for child care stakeholders during the coronavirus pandemic." By Rebecca Ullrich. Center for Law and Social Policy, May 6, 2020, pp. 1-12.
    Presents an overview of the federal Unemployment Insurance [UI] system, federal aid options available under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security [CARES] Act, and how unemployment compensation can support child care providers during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • 20.05.46 / "Can we sue our way out of quarantine?" By Larry Salzman. City Journal (Manhattan Institute), May 20, 2020, pp. 1-4.
    Assesses states’ use of five budgeting tools for natural disaster funding: statewide disaster accounts, rainy day funds, supplemental appropriations, transfer authority, and state agency budgets. Accompanies a new Pew Charitable Trusts report.
  • 20.05.47 / "North Texas outlook: Manufacturing." By Evan Hoopfer. Dallas Business Journal, May 15, 2020, pp. 8-9.
    Discusses how North Texas manufacturing companies are fighting the effects of COVID-19 and establishing their recovery plans.
  • 20.05.48 / "The business of health: Prognosis mixed." Economist, May 9th-15th, 2020, pp. 49-50.
    Points out how the COVID-19 pandemic will reshape the health care industry, noting the winners and losers.
  • 20.05.49 / "Health data and privacy: Looking without looking." Economist, May 16th-22nd, 2020, pp. 69-70.
    Highlights a new way of studying medical records that does not require the copying of patient records and leaves behind a log of the researcher's actions.
  • 20.05.50 / "State policies that treat prenatal substance use as child abuse or neglect fail to achieve their intended goals." By Danielle N. Atkins and Christine Piette Durrance. Health Affairs, May 2020, pp. 756-763.
    Examines the effects of state-level policies related to prenatal substance use. Finds no evidence that punitive substance abuse policies reduced neonatal abstinence syndrome [NAS] or maternal narcotic exposure, but did find these policies may deter women from seeking treatment.
  • 20.05.51 / "Texas after COVID-19: Report dives into what the state should learn." By Daniel Salazar. Houston Business Journal, May 18, 2020, pp. 1-2.
    Reviews a report coauthored by former Senator Kirk Watson that explores what Texas can do to prepare for economic downturns, such as the current one tied to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • 20.05.52 / "Opportunities and barriers for telemedicine in the U.S. during the COVID-19 emergency and beyond." By Gabriela Weigel, et al. Issue Brief (Kaiser Family Foundation), May 11, 2020, pp. 1-15.
    Discusses changes to telemedicine policies as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, including efforts by the federal government, state governments, commercial insurers, and health care providers to expand access and coverage. Recommends additional permanent measures to sustain and increase access to telemedicine.
  • 20.05.53 / "Reopening schools in the context of COVID-19: Health and safety guidelines from other countries." By Hanna Melnick, et al. Learning Policy Institute, May 15, 2020, pp. 1-13.
    Discusses guidelines and strategies used in five countries that have continued or reopened schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Provides insight on how state policymakers can safeguard students and staff when schools are reopened.
  • 20.05.54 / "How wastewater could help track the spread of the new coronavirus." By Katherine J. Wu. Smithsonian Magazine, May 14, 2020, pp. 1-4.
    Highlights a potential method for tracking COVID-19 infections using sewage..
  • 20.05.55 / "Workers fit for the future." By Suzanne Hultin. State Legislatures, May/June 2020, pp. 38-39.
    Discusses the transformation of today's workplace and how state legislatures are helping workers evolve with technology.
  • 20.05.56 / "How remdesivir became the first and biggest hope for treating COVID-19." By Alice Park. Time, June 2020, pp. 58-65.
    Examines how the experimental drug remdesivir has emerged as a possible new therapy for COVID-19 patients. Addresses how the drug works, the humans studies conducted on it, and its safety and efficacy.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, May 21

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Read about elder law issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic. (American Bar Association, May-June 2020)
  • Find coronavirus testing sites across the state. (Texas Department of Public Safety, accessed May 20, 2020)
  • Review recommendations aimed at preventing another pandemic. (National Coronavirus Recovery Commission, a project of The Heritage Foundation, May 19, 2020)
  • Consider whether law enforcement and first responders should have access to COVID-19 case data. (AP News, May 19, 2020)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • 20.05.30 / "Being healthy and ready to learn is linked with socioeconomic conditions for preschoolers." By Gabriel Piña, et al. Child Trends, May 2020, pp. 1-21.
    Analyzes the influence of social, demographic, and economic factors on the preschool readiness of children ages three to five. Discusses findings relating to income levels, food insecurity, access to private health insurance, educational attainment of parents, language spoken at home, and race and ethnicity.
  • 20.05.31 / "Going rogue: The electoral college." Economist, May 9th-15th, 2020, p. 19.
    Discusses a case before the United States Supreme Court, Chiafalo v. Washington, which examines whether a state has the power to legally enforce how a presidential elector casts his or her ballot.
  • 20.05.32 / "With costs on the rise, how does my state pay for natural disasters?" Fact Sheet (Pew Charitable Trusts), May 2020, pp. 1-8.
    Assesses states’ use of five budgeting tools for natural disaster funding: statewide disaster accounts, rainy day funds, supplemental appropriations, transfer authority, and state agency budgets. Accompanies a new Pew Charitable Trusts report.
  • 20.05.33 / "Wide state-level variation in commercial health care prices suggests uneven impact of price regulation." By Michael E. Chernew, Andrew L. Hicks, and Shivani A. Shah. Health Affairs, May 2020, pp. 791-799.
    Compares commercial prices for inpatient and outpatient facility services and professional health care services with Medicare rates by state. Argues the extreme gap between commercial and Medicare prices and the variation in costs by state suggests there is a role for regulation, but cautions uneven effects on hospital revenue warrant a slow transition.
  • 20.05.34 / "Americans: Who deserves tuition-free college." By Elizabeth Bell. Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education, May 2020, pp. 1-4.
    Explores what Americans think about tuition-free college programs, who deserves to be eligible, and how the programs should be structured.
  • 20.05.35 / "Important new features in the USMCA." By David A. Gantz. Issue Brief (Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy), May 5, 2020, pp. 1-7.
    Explains new features in the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement [USMCA] that could have a significant impact on the interpretation, application, and longevity of the USMCA in the future.
  • 20.05.36 / "A state-by-state look at coronavirus in prisons." By The Marshall Project. Marshall Project, May 8, 2020, pp. 1-14.
    Provides data on COVID-19 infections and deaths among prisoners and staff in state and federal prisons. Updates statistics by state frequently.
  • 20.05.37 / "What mutual aid can do during a pandemic." By Jia Tolentino. New Yorker, May 11, 2020, pp. 1-14.
    Considers mutual-aid projects initiated due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Compares and contrasts these informal networks shaped by volunteers and recipients of services with similar movements from the past.
  • 20.05.38 / "Legal liability and COVID-19 recovery." By Tyler Cowen and Trace Mitchell. Policy Brief (Mercatus Center, George Mason University), May 8, 2020, pp. 1-6.
    Examines how policymakers can reopen businesses while avoiding the most egregious instances of harm to workers and customers. Recommends that policymakers limit COVID-19 liability to reckless behavior for the short run, rely on regulation to limit egregious risks, and establish a COVID-19 compensation program for the longer run.
  • 20.05.39 / "COVID-19 impact projections on Texas economy." By Luis B. Torres. Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University, May 14, 2020, pp. 1-6.
    Considers the economic impact of COVID-19 in Texas, based on data through May 2, 2020. Explains the methodology behind a new weekly Texas leading economic activity index.
  • 20.05.40 / "Hispanic adults in families with noncitizens disproportionately feel the economic fallout from COVID-19." By Dulce Gonzalez, et al. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, May 2020, pp. 1-10.
    Analyzes the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on family employment, financial security, and material hardship among nonelderly Hispanic adults by family citizenship status. Discusses the unique challenges of noncitizen Hispanics in overcoming economic shocks.
  • 20.05.41 / "Did that drone just tell us to stay 6 feet apart?" By Lindsey Van Ness. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), May 15, 2020, pp. 1-8.
    Raises concerns that law enforcement agencies' use of drones for coronavirus-related surveillance could pose unnecessary and significant risks to privacy, civil rights, and civil liberties.
  • 20.05.42 / "No double-dipping." By Joey Berlin. Texas Medicine, May 2020, pp. 25-27.
    Highlights Virlar and Gonzaba Medical Group v. Puente, a case recently before the Fourth Court of Appeals in which a physician tried to reduce a damage award to a patient based upon a family member's separate settlement. Argues medical tort reform in 2003 (HB4, 78th Legislature, R.S.) should keep plaintiffs from manipulating their settlements.
  • 20.05.43 / "A century of advocacy: 100 years of realtors shaping Texas." By Jaime Lee. Texas Realtor, May 2020, pp. 24-26.
    Celebrates the Texas Association of Realtors' centennial. Highlights significant legislative milestones that have positioned the association as the go-to information source elected officials rely on when implementing real estate public policy.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

 

Current Articles & Research Resources, May 14

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Track health trends at the state and county level related to COVID-19 cases. (The Heritage Foundation, updated May 11, 2020)
  • Consider the fate of America's meat packing industry. (Human Events, May 6, 2020)
  • Read about strategies to sustain and improve domestic manufacturing during the pandemic. (National Conference of State Legislatures, May 2020)
  • Explore the federal spending landscape. (U.S. Department of Treasury, accessed May 13, 2020)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • 20.05.17 / "Charters' costly failure to launch." Advocate (Texas State Teachers Association), Spring 2020, pp. 6-7.
    Considers whether the charter school system in Texas is economically sustainable. Discusses Texas legislation on charter school funding and expansion. Highlights a recent report by the Network for Public Education.
  • 20.05.18 / "States are leveraging Medicaid to respond to COVID-19." By Jessica Schubel. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, May 7, 2020, pp. 1-14.
    Surveys recent state Medicaid initiatives to strengthen home- and community-based services [HCBS] programs and improve access to health care coverage. Discusses ways Medicaid agencies can respond to COVID-19.
  • 20.05.19 / "Misplaced benevolence." By Rafael A. Mangual. City Journal (Manhattan Institute), May 4, 2020, pp. 1-3.
    Argues "decarceration" bail reform initiatives have resulted in serious and avoidable new crimes, putting the public at risk.
  • 20.05.20 / "COVID-19 changes nursing and the nation's health-care needs." By Laura Williams-Tracy. Dallas Business Journal, May 8, 2020, pp. 12-13.
    Reports COVID-19 may resurrect public health nursing, which focuses on the health risks of a community and disease prevention. Points out the ongoing debate about the necessity of physicians to oversee the work of nurse practitioners. Includes sidebar, "States Grant Nurse Practitioners Full Practice Authority."
  • 20.05.21 / "Designing a state and local government relief package." By Jared Walczak. Fiscal Fact (Tax Foundation), May 2020, pp. 1-15.
    Discusses declining state and local tax revenue amid the COVID-19 pandemic, with fifteen to twenty percent state tax revenue losses projected by the National Conference of State Legislatures. Outlines five considerations in designing a future state and local government relief package, including spending flexibility.
  • 20.05.22 / "Young people and vote by mail: Lessons for 2020." Internet Resource, May 6, 2020, pp. 1-6.
    Considers how and why young people voted by mail in 2016. Offers insights to state and local governments looking to expand the practice in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • 20.05.23 / "The role of employer repayment programs in tackling student loan debt." By Joe Valenti. Issue Brief (AARP Public Policy Institute), May 2020, pp. 1-9.
    Discusses the basics of student loan repayment, types of employer repayment programs, and some implementation obstacles. Presents emerging approaches to workplace student loan benefits.
  • 20.05.24 / "Double jeopardy: Low wage workers at risk for health and financial implications of COVID-19." By Rachel Garfield, et al. Issue Brief (Kaiser Family Foundation), April 29, 2020, pp. 1-6.
    Analyzes the risks low-wage workers face as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, including the effects on their jobs, health, and financial security. Provides an appendix with the number of low-wage workers by state and by industry for each state.
  • 20.05.25 / "Privileges and immunity certification during the COVID-19 pandemic." By Mark A. Hall and David M. Studdert. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), May 6, 2020, pp. 1-5.
    Discusses the issues with COVID-19-related immunity certifications, documentation that gives individuals who have immunity to the disease certain work and social freedoms. Argues issues with testing and unproven assumptions of immunity cast doubt on the merits of certifications and additional negative consequences such as invidious discrimination and intentional infection could follow.
  • 20.05.26 / "Seasick." By Spencer Aronfeld. Texas Lawyer, May 2020, pp. 20-21.
    Examines cruise lines' liability in the age of the coronavirus pandemic. Offers recommendations for the adoption of clear and uniform protocols to prevent and contain disease outbreaks on cruise ships.
  • 20.05.27 / "A boost for behavioral health." By Sean Price. Texas Medicine, May 2020, pp. 43-45.
    Describes new mental health initiatives for children that were made possible by SB11, 86th Legislature, and the creation of the Texas Child Mental Health Care Consortium, including the Child Psychiatric Access Network [CPAN] and the Texas Child Health Access Through Telemedicine [TCHATT]. Quotes former Representative John Zerwas, M.D.
  • 20.05.28 / "Houston is not prepared for the oil bust." By Evan Mintz. Texas Monthly, May 2020, pp. 1-5.
    Discusses the negative effects the COVID-19 pandemic could have on the Houston economy. Points out Houston was already preparing for an economic downturn and continues to rely on the oil and gas industry.
  • 20.05.29 / "Texas health officials undercount COVID-19 cases by excluding some prisoners who tested positive." By Michael Barajas, Sophie Novack, and Lise Olsen. Texas Observer, May 7, 2020, pp. 1-9.
    Reports on Texas Department of State Health Services statistics related to COVID-19 cases in state prisons. Explores what the Texas Department of Criminal Justice is doing to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, May 7

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Explore tax help resources related to COVID-19 pandemic relief. (Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, April 27, 2020)
  • Track business formation statistics by state. (U.S. Census Bureau, April 15, 2020)
  • Consider the role telecommuting will play even as the COVID-19 pandemic fades. (Brookings, April 6, 2020)
  • Read about decisions from Apple and Google not to allow location tracking in contact tracing apps. (Reuters, May 4, 2020)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • 20.05.01 / "Will cars still be king? 'More people in less vehicles'." By Daniel Salazar. Austin Business Journal, May 1, 2020, pp. 4, 6.
    Provides an in-depth look at what an Austin commute will look like in twenty years. Considers how COVID-19 could alter the timelines for the Austin Strategic Mobility Plan.
  • 20.05.02 / "Rightsizing fed ed: Principles for reform and practical steps to move in the right direction." By Mary Clare Amselem, et al. CATO Policy Report, May 4, 2020, pp. 1-12.
    Describes federal involvement and recommends reforms in seven specific areas of education: elementary and secondary education funding, curricular standards and testing mandates, state and local planning mandates, school choice, higher education, early childhood education and care, and civil rights.
  • 20.05.03 / "Streamlining Medicaid enrollment during COVID-19 public health emergency." By Jennifer Wagner. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, April 7, 2020, pp. 1-8.
    Discusses how states can streamline Medicaid enrollment processes during the COVID-19 pandemic, to expedite health coverage for eligible individuals, particularly children, pregnant women, parents, senior citizens, and people with disabilities, and reduce the administrative burden on eligibility staff.
  • 20.05.04 / "How coronavirus will change the US, from where we live to the way we connect." By Peter Grier. Christian Science Monitor, April 28, 2020, pp. 1-6.
    Considers the changes the COVID-19 pandemic may bring to the United States. Discusses the increased role of online activities, a potential dispersion from urban areas, and the concept of patriotism expanding to honor all who serve our communities, such as health care workers and teachers.
  • 20.05.05 / "The post-pandemic university." By Allison Schrager. City Journal (Manhattan Institute), May 3, 2020, pp. 1-4.
    Reports that the COVID-19 pandemic will accelerate progress toward a more customizable and affordable system of higher education, one that includes a hybrid system of online and in-person instruction, expands consumer choice, and preserves the core functions of the university.
  • 20.05.06 / "COVID-19: Tests of reason." Economist, April 25th-May 1st, 2020, pp. 70-72.
    Explains that countries will have to build and deploy testing systems at an unprecedented scale to end their pandemic-related lockdowns safely. Notes that this scale of testing infrastructure will cost far less than the estimated $400 billion per month cost of the pandemic to the United States.
  • 20.05.07 / "The crisis in carmaking: From 60 to zero." Economist, April 25th-May 1st, 2020, pp. 60-61.
    Recommends ways to save a precarious car industry: adaptation to new health protocols for redesigning and operating assembly lines, investments in green technologies, and consolidation to pool scarce resources.
  • 20.05.08 / "A blueprint for back to school." By John Bailey and Frederick Hess. Education Next, May 4, 2020, pp. 1-15.
    Details a number of considerations that education leaders and public officials should consider while developing plans for reopening schools when the coronavirus pandemic subsides.
  • 20.05.09 / "Schools struggle to meet rising demand for food." By Corey Mitchell. Education Week, April 29, 2020, pp. 1-5.
    Examines how school meal distribution programs implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic are faring in Texas and other states. Discusses school districts in Dallas and San Antonio.
  • 20.05.10 / "A basic demographic profile of workers in frontline industries." By Hye Jin Rho, Hayley Brown, and Shawn Fremstad. Issue Brief (Center for Economic and Policy Research), April 2020, pp. 1-10.
    Documents the number of workers in six groups of frontline industries and the characteristics of the workforce in each of these industry groups. Points out these essential workers remain unprotected and undercompensated under the COVID-19 legislation passed to date.
  • 20.05.11 / "The current plague considered as a deregulatory opportunity." By Casey B. Mulligan. National Review, May 4, 2020, pp. 21-22.
    Argues the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the weaknesses of centralized planning and regulations. Explains the Right to Try Act, which grants patients access to experimental drugs and may allow for quicker development of COVID-19 treatments.
  • 20.05.12 / "What is the value of public education?" By Frederick M. Hess. National Review, May 4, 2020, pp. 28-30.
    Suggests the COVID-19 pandemic has served as a reminder of the roles schools play in providing socialization and social services, purposes not captured by test scores. Argues many schools have not met the challenge of providing appropriate distance learning to fulfill public education's mission.
  • 20.05.13 / "How health costs might change with COVID-19." By Cynthia Cox, et al. Peterson-KFF Health System Tracker, April 15, 2020, pp. 1-7.
    Discusses the higher health care costs that private health insurers and government health programs could face as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Includes factors that could increase and decrease health costs as well as special considerations for Medicare and Medicaid programs and enrollees.
  • 20.05.14 / "Six things states can do to support learning during coronavirus." State Policy Network, April 27, 2020, pp. 1-4.
    Provides policy recommendations related to public education that address the new challenges school districts, teachers, and families are facing due to school closures. Includes links to proposals by state think tanks.
  • 20.05.15 / "Blocked in the digital age: Constitutional dimensions of elected officials silencing critics on social media." By John G. Browning and Reginald A. Hirsch. Texas Bar Journal, May 2020, pp. 324-326.
    Addresses the issue of elected officials blocking or censoring critics on social media platforms. Mentions the federal lawsuit brought against Speaker of the House Dennis Bonnen by Lone Star Gun Rights activists, relating to HB357, 86th Legislature.
  • 20.05.16 / "School district tax rate compression and tax ratification elections." Texas Taxpayers and Research Association, April 2020, pp. 1-2.
    Describes school finance provisions in HB3, 86th Legislature, relating to maintenance and operations [M&O] tax rates and new requirements for voter approval of higher rates through tax ratification elections.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

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