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Current Articles & Research Resources, August 16

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Read about the leading causes of death in rural areas. (National Conference of State Legislatures, July 30, 2018)
  • Explore the economic outlook for the United States. (Congressional Budget Office, August 13, 2018)
  • Track hate and extremism throughout the country. (Anti-Defamation League, ©2018)
  • Consider how Americans feel about getting news from major internet companies. (The Knight Foundation, ©2018)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "Hard hitting." By Julianne Hill. ABA Journal: The Lawyer's Magazine, August 2018, pp. 16-18.
    Reports on litigation related to youth tackle football injuries. Notes several states have pulled or killed legislation proposing to ban the sport or prohibiting certain youth from participating in youth tackle football.
  • "Partial Medicaid expansions fall short of full Medicaid expansion with respect to coverage and access to care." By Jessica Schubel. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, August 13, 2018, pp. 1-10.
    Discusses recent proposals for partial Medicaid expansion in Arkansas, Massachusetts, and Utah, using section 1115 demonstration waiver authority.
  • "One school's fight to keep racial equity." By Stacy Teicher Khadaroo. Christian Science Monitor, August 6, 2018, pp. 18-20.
    Highlights City Garden Montessori, a charter school in St. Louis, and its mission to offer racial and economic diversity and an anti-bias, antiracist education. States it is one of 125 charter schools identified as "diverse by design" by the Century Foundation. Related information at: https://tcf.org/content/report/diverse-design-charter-schools/?agreed=1
  • "Academic-freedom statement alarms U. of Texas professors and sets off debate on campus." By Lindsay Ellis. Chronicle of Higher Education, August 3, 2018, p. A27.
    Highlights the argument over academic freedom carried out in court documents as part of the campus carry lawsuit brought by three University of Texas at Austin professors.
  • "Can a huge online college solve California's work-force problems?" By Karin Fischer. Chronicle of Higher Education, August 3, 2018, pp. A12-A15.
    Discusses the new California initiative to provide a wholly online community college, aimed at working adults, with the potential to become the largest provider of distance education in the nation. Explains the entity will only offer certificates or credentials, and not degrees. Highlights other online programs, such as Western Governors University.
  • "Commercialising autonomous vehicles: Gently does it." Economist, August 4th-10th, 2018, pp. 57-58.
    Highlights a six-month trial of self-driving minivans that began in Frisco, Texas this summer. Explains how startup Drive.ai, recognizing the limitations of today's technology, is making things simpler and safer by focusing on a limited area of the city and operating during daylight hours.
  • "Private equity: Healthy returns." Economist, July 28th-August 3rd, 2018, pp. 54-55.
    Explains why private equity and institutional investors are expanding into the health care market. Notes budget constraints are making governments more open to private capital and public-private partnerships.
  • "Texas landowners subsidize pipelines and powerlines." By Isaac Perez. Houston Business Journal, August 16, 2018, p. 42.
    Examines the efforts of several Texas organizations interested in reforming the eminent domain process.
  • "The health innovation we need." By Dave A. Chokshi. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), August 7, 2018, pp. 427-429.
    Provides a broad view of health and health care innovation, with examples of possible innovations in the domains of care delivery, public health priorities, and the role of government.
  • "Why early childhood education matters and why we should pay for it." By Elizabeth U. Cascio. Milken Institute Review, Third Quarter 2018, pp. 13-23.
    Identifies roadblocks to government support of early childhood education and care [ECEC]. Discusses the need to create more incentives for state and local funding of ECEC.
  • "The border at work." By Jerry Kammer. National Review, August 13, 2018, pp. 31-33.
    Argues the immigration system will not improve until there is a commitment to worksite enforcement and creation of a worker-verification system impervious to fraud.
  • "Examining the costs of paid sick leave besides wages." By Tony Quesada. San Antonio Business Journal, August 10, 2018, p. 3.
    Discusses the effects a mandatory city-wide sick leave ordinance would have on employers.
  • "FEMA to play long-term role in recovery from Harvey." By Rachel Brasier and Jesse Thompson. Southwest Economy (Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas), Second Quarter 2018, pp. 15-17, 20.
    Provides an overview of the Federal Emergency Management Agency's [FEMA] role in Hurricane Harvey recovery thus far, through public assistance and hazard mitigation grants. Notes future FEMA involvement will shift to long-term flood infrastructure improvements, including the "coastal spine."
  • "Hurricane Harvey: One year later." By Sean Price. Texas Medicine, August 2018, pp. 18-23.
    Describes the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey and the ensuing public health issues and mental health challenges. Notes that Harvey's full impact will not be known soon due to the lack of resources dedicated to evaluation.
  • "Hurricane Harvey: The way back." By Joey Berlin. Texas Medicine, August 2018, pp. 24-29.
    Identifies lessons learned by physicians as they work to recover from Hurricane Harvey, such as the importance of removing computer equipment when evacuating, backing up patient medical records, and investing in supplemental flood insurance.
  • "Port of no return." By Michael Barajas and Sophie Novak. Texas Observer, August/September 2018, pp. 22-29.
    Examines how Port Arthur and its residents are recovering one year after the destruction of Hurricane Harvey. Argues that the recovery process is flawed and provides unequal recovery assistance to poor residents.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, August 9

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Explore sunset reviews of occupational licensing in Texas and other states. (National Conference of State Legislatures, July 2018)
  • Consider the quality and safety of tap water in the U.S. (NPR, July 27, 2018)
  • Note the deadline to apply for an emergency grant to repair Hurricane Harvey damage to historic sites is August 15. (Texas Historical Commission, accessed August 8, 2018)
  • Look up at the night sky this weekend to see the Perseid meteor shower. (Mashable, August 8, 2018)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "Tear gas to tweets." By Jessica Mendoza. Christian Science Monitor, July 30, 2018, pp. 24-30.
    Examines how protest movements have evolved since 1968, from attempts to raise public awareness to promoting change within government through increased representation. Comments that despite well-intentioned laws and changes in public opinion, these movements still tend to coalesce around race, gender, and inequality.
  • "The Dallas tech surge: Demand is climbing — and so are paychecks." By Brian Womack. Dallas Business Journal, July 27, 2018, pp. 12-14.
    Discusses the rising cost of business for tech firms in the Dallas-Fort Worth market.
  • "Pollution and the law: Prosecuting Flint." Economist, July 28th-August 3rd, 2018, pp. 21-22.
    Explains the types of lawsuits that have been filed in response to the Flint, Michigan water contamination crisis. Considers the extent to which government officials can be held accountable for their actions on the job.
  • "Electronic health records associated with lower hospital mortality after systems have time to mature." By Sunny C. Lin, Ashish K. Jha, and Julia Adler-Milstein. Health Affairs, July 2018, pp. 1128-1135.
    Suggests that national implementation of electronic health records [EHRs] in hospitals should yield improvements in mortality rates, but the investment will take time to be realized. Notes that small and nonteaching hospitals appear to have the most to gain.
  • "The role of community health centers in addressing the opioid epidemic." By Julia Zur, et al. Internet Resource, July 2018, pp. 1-12.
    Examines findings from a 2018 survey of community health centers on activities related to the prevention and treatment of opioid use disorder [OUD]. Reports that most community health centers have seen an increase in the number of patients with OUD in the past three years, but they face many treatment capacity challenges in responding to the opioid epidemic.
  • "COST's principles of state business tax conformity with federal tax reform." By Douglas L. Lindholm, Karla Frieden, and Ferdinand Hogroian. Journal of MultiState Taxation and Incentives, August 2018, pp. 14-19.
    Summarizes the Council on State Taxation's [COST] principles of state business tax conformity with federal tax reform. Argues states should carefully analyze potential revenue changes and tax policy implications.
  • "Polysubstance abuse among adolescents in a low income, rural community: Latent classes for middle- and high-school students." By Roderick A. Rose, et al. Journal of Rural Health, Summer 2018, pp. 227-245.
    Examines rural adolescent substance use, noting that opioid misuse is associated with initiation of illicit drugs prior to age thirteen. Observes patterns of younger adolescents in certain groups turning to prescription drugs and inhalants.
  • "Fixing the hole when the rains come in: How to narrow the gap between coverage and damage in catastrophe insurance." Milken Institute Review, Third Quarter 2018, pp. 46-53.
    Discusses risk management in catastrophe insurance. Considers costs of natural disasters and the role of public policy to incentivize private financial institutions to manage risk.
  • "School district crisis preparedness, response, and recovery plans — United States, 2006, 2012, and 2016." By Judy Kruger, et al. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), August 3, 2018, pp. 809-814.
    Examines school districts' implementation of policies to improve school crisis preparedness, response, and recovery plans. Notes that large districts (greater than or equal to 10,000 students) were significantly more likely than were small districts (less than or equal to 4,999 students) to provide funding for or offer crisis preparedness training for school faculty, staff members, and students' families.
  • "Harvey highlights Houston MUD bond development funding." By Laila Assanie and Michael Weiss. Southwest Economy (Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas), Second Quarter 2018, pp. 3-7.
    Considers the possibility of funding new housing infrastructure with municipal utility district [MUD] bonds after the historic flooding from Hurricane Harvey. Discusses MUD creation, taxing powers, and the growing reach and influence of MUDs in the Houston housing market.
  • "Another use for drones: Investigating car wrecks." By Jenni Bergal. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), August 6, 2018, pp. 1-5.
    Reports more police agencies are using drones to reconstruct vehicle accidents, reducing staff time and the time roads are closed. Notes some states that require police to get a search warrant to use drones for surveillance are adding exemptions for crash reconstruction.
  • "Bordering on empty." By Naveena Sadasivam. Texas Observer, August/September, 2018, pp. 12-21.
    Argues climate change is having a significant toll on the Rio Grande and the water infrastructure of the Rio Grande Valley. Discusses how hotter, dryer weather affects cities and towns, irrigation districts, and the agriculture industry in the area.
  • "Price-formation studies." Texas Public Power, July-August 2018, pp. 5, 7.
    Summarizes two recent reports from the Energy Regulatory Commission of Texas [ERCOT] that address the Public Utility Commission's Project to Assess Price-Formation Rules in ERCOT's Energy-Only Market. Related information at: http://interchange.puc.texas.gov/Search/Filings?UtilityType=A&ControlNumber=47199&ItemMatch=Equal&DocumentType=ALL&SortOrder=Ascending.  Reports at: http://www.ercot.com/content/wcm/lists/144930/Study_of_the_Benefits_of_Marginal_Losses_FINAL.pdf  and http://www.ercot.com/content/wcm/lists/144930/Study_of_the_Benefits_of_Real-Time_Co-optimization_FINAL.pdf

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, August 2

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Read about precautions to take if wildfire smoke is in your area. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, July 31, 2018)
  • Review how much it costs to run a state's prison system, state by state. (24/7 Wall St., July 26, 2018)
  • Consider what states are doing to combat robocalls. (Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), July 25, 2018)
  • Examine the facts related to 3D printing of guns. (The Weekly Standard, July 31, 2018)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "Income-share agreements: Higher returns." Economist, July 21st-27th, 2018, p. 57.
    Reports some universities are working with investors to offer students a different approach to paying tuition and fees — "income-share agreements" [ISAs]. Explains ISAs spare students the higher payments associated with private loans and lower their debt burden.
  • "U.S. Supreme Court and schools: 2017-18." Education Week, July 18, 2018, p. 20.
    Summarizes recent United States Supreme Court rulings on K-12 education, including school funding, immigration, teachers' unions, and an assortment of First Amendment issues.
  • "Regional transportation council looking at possible projects." By Paul K. Harral. Fort Worth Business Press, July 16-22, 2018, pp. 8, 10.
    Details the North Texas Regional Transportation Council's consideration of transportation initiatives based on hyperloop technology.
  • "New approaches in Medicaid: Work requirements, health savings accounts, and health care access." By Benjamin D. Sommers, et al. Health Affairs, July 2018, pp. 1099-1108.
    Assesses views from low-income adults in Indiana, Ohio, and Kansas (representing three different Medicaid policies) on health savings accounts, work requirements, and Medicaid expansion. Finds that current Medicaid innovations may lead to unintended consequences for coverage and access to health care.
  • "The prospective role of charity care programs in a changing health care landscape." By Matthew Ralls, Lauren Moran, and Stephen A. Somers. Internet Resource, July 2018, pp. 1-5.
    Explores the current and future role of charity care programs [CCPs] in offering and organizing free- and reduced-cost health care to individuals. Notes that CCPs predict an increased demand for services but have concerns about funding.
  • "The natural gas grid needs better monitoring." By Gerad Freeman, Jay Apt, and Michael Dworkin. Issues in Science and Technology, Summer 2018, pp. 79-84.
    Explains that outages affecting the natural gas pipeline system are not well-documented, nor are they tracked by the federal government. Discusses the reliability of the natural gas pipeline system and how it affects electric power plants.
  • "Potential policy approaches to address diet-related diseases." By Michael F. Jacobson, James Krieger, and Kelly D. Brownell. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), July 24/31, 2018, pp. 341-342.
    Suggests local, state, and federal jurisdictions, as well as private companies, take policy actions to address recent reports indicating higher obesity and sodium consumption rates.
  • "Lessons from the opioid epidemic: How public schools have become the safety net of last resort for traumatized children." By Zoe Carpenter. Nation, July 30/August 6, 2018, pp. 12-19.
    Examines the opioid crisis in West Virginia, the state with the highest rate of death by overdose: 43.4 overdose deaths per 100,000 compared with the national average of 13.3. Discusses the "atrophy of public services across small-town America," including the lack of counselors and family support in public schools and rural health clinics ill-equipped to handle addiction.
  • "McPolitics." By Yascha Mounk. New Yorker, July 2, 2018, pp. 59-63.
    Considers the transformation and homogenization of the two political parties into "nationalized" parties and away from an older system that saw interest and power at the local level. Argues nationalization has led to the "rise of two political mega-identities" and intense partisanship. Suggests common ground and moderation can still be found.
  • "Not just for lawyers: Environmental impacts of natural gas pipelines." By Ed Comer. Public Utilities Fortnightly, July 2018, pp. 42-45, 78.
    Discusses major legal disputes currently affecting the utility industry. Focuses on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's consideration of the environmental issues related to natural gas pipelines. Related information at:https://ceq.doe.gov/
  • "Underwater." By Jen Schwartz. Scientific American, August 2018, pp. 44-55.
    Explores the chronic and extreme flooding experienced in coastal communities along the Atlantic coast. Discusses buyout programs operated by local and federal governments to move people away from such areas.
  • "Power in the bank." By Daniel Shea. State Legislatures, July/August 2018, pp. 38-41.
    Points out the benefits of energy storage and the technology's limitations under current regulatory and market structures.
  • "Technology tests transparency." By Pam Greenberg. State Legislatures, July/August 2018, pp. 46-47, 49.
    Discusses how states are using technology to manage an increasing number of public records requests and to address the challenges new digital formats create.
  • "Home delivery: Where is all the new housing?" By Luis B. Torres and Wesley Miller. Tierra Grande, July 2018, pp. 2-5.
    Examines why new home inventories in Texas are below what is considered a balanced market. Attributes this imbalance, which is affecting housing affordability, to a variety of factors, including rising land prices, sluggish labor productivity, and regulations.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, July 26

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • See which airports have the least secure Wi-Fi. (Fortune, July 18, 2018)
  • Review the EPA's assessment of the response to the Flint water crisis. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, July 19, 2018)
  • Read about Google's Chrome browser flagging sites that don't use HTTPS. (ZDNet, July 24, 2018)
  • Consider U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's answers to questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee. (U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary, July 21, 2018)
  • Explore a visual representation of spending on health care in the United States. (California Health Care Foundation, April 6, 2018)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "Security retrofit." By Charles Sosnik. American School Board Journal, August 2018, pp. 24-26.
    Offers suggestions on how older school buildings can be renovated to improve security and reduce incidents of school shootings.
  • "Employment and wages: Labour party." Economist, July 14th-20th, 2018, pp. 25-26.
    Explains the benefits of labor shortages. Suggests that a labor market in which firms must compete for workers should help resolve America's biggest economic problems — inadequate wage growth and slow productivity growth.
  • "Physicians' participation in Medicaid increased only slightly following expansion." By Hannah T. Neprash, et al. Health Affairs, July 2018, pp. 1087-1091.
    Provides data and analysis on primary care physician participation in Medicaid before and after the 2014 expansion. Reports that most physicians in expansion states maintained or slightly increased their Medicaid participation; there was no significant change among physicians in non-expansion states.
  • "Work to protect landowners from eminent domain laws continues." By Robert McKnight. Houston Business Journal, July 19, 2018, p. 46.
    Summarizes the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association's efforts related to eminent domain.
  • "Sales tax holidays: An ineffective alternative to real sales tax reform." By Dylan Grundman. Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, July 2018, pp. 1-5.
    Finds that sales tax holidays are poorly targeted and too temporary to change the regressive nature of a state's tax system in a substantial way.
  • "Trends and characteristics of occupational suicide and homicide in farmers and agriculture workers, 1992–2010." By Wendy Ringgenberg, et al. Journal of Rural Health, Summer 2018, pp. 246-253.
    Identifies patterns specific to suicide and homicide rates in the agricultural industry to aid in targeting prevention strategies.
  • "Red-state rumblings: After nearly a decade of Republican anti-tax 'experiments,' are voters fed up with being the guinea pigs?" By Bryce Covert. Nation, July 30/August 6, 2018, pp. 20-24.
    Examines the effects of recent large-scale tax cuts in Oklahoma, Kansas, and other Republican-led states on teachers, school funding, business creation, and job growth. Comments on the ensuing backlash by teachers in Oklahoma.
  • "Life after Roe." By Ramesh Ponnuru. National Review, July 30, 2018, pp. 14-15.
    Considers potential changes to the political landscape if Roe v. Wade is overturned. Predicts Congress would likely deadlock on any new laws, and therefore, state supreme courts and state legislatures would possibly control a variety of new laws.
  • "The big question." By Joshua Rothman. New Yorker, July 23, 2018, pp. 26-28, 30, 32.
    Discusses a variety of books and studies that explain why our "intuitive comparisons between the past and the present are unreliable," with many polls showing people believe the past was better despite data to the contrary. Suggests this view has affected our politics.
  • "Source water protection: Pursue sustainability to protect source water." By Adam West. Opflow, June 2018, pp. 20-23.
    Provides a case study of a water utility in Arkansas that uses sustainability principles and best practices to support water source protection efforts.
  • "How labor regulation harms unskilled workers." By Warren Meyer. Regulation (CATO Institute), Summer 2018, pp. 44-50.
    Suggests mass government regulation that raises the price of labor and limits business growth will prompt employers to turn to fewer, higher-skilled workers and automation.
  • "Autonomous vehicles: No driver ... no regulation?" By Joan Claybrook and Shaun Kildare. Science, July 6, 2018, pp. 36-37.
    Discusses autonomous vehicle [AV] technology and calls for some regulation of AVs. Points out recent fatal crashes involving AVs and explains that voluntary federal guidelines fall short of addressing the public's concerns about AVs.
  • "Finding common ground: School safety." By Ben Erwin. State Legislatures, July/August 2018, pp. 22-25.
    Reports on the different approaches state legislatures are taking to address school safety concerns. Notes more than 200 school safety bills and resolutions have been proposed since the shootings in Parkland, Florida.
  • "H-town: Houston and hurricanes." By Robert W. Gilmer. Tierra Grande, July 2018, pp. 6-9.
    Discusses the economic impact of eight major storms, including Hurricane Harvey, on Houston. Argues Houston's economy has proven resilient but flood management and infrastructure continue to be a challenge.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, July 19

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Read about Judge Brett Kavanaugh, nominated for the U.S. Supreme Court by President Trump. (Congressional Research Service, July 10, 2018)
  • Explore this year's thought-provoking photography. (National Geographic, 2018)
  • Avoid spreading invasive species throughout area lakes. (Texas Parks & Wildlife, accessed July 18, 2018)
  • Consider some tips on swimming safety. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, June 5, 2018)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "The politics of patriotism." By Doug Struck. Christian Science Monitor, July 9 & 16, 2018, pp. 24-30.
    Considers the various definitions and meanings given to patriotism and what those might mean to people as they go about their daily lives.
  • "Universities are hotbeds of scholarship on mass incarceration. But are they doing enough to fix the problem?" By Marc Parry. Chronicle of Higher Education, July 6, 2018, pp. A14-A19.
    Reviews historians' scholarship on mass incarceration. Highlights recent events at Harvard University that reflect both the challenges and possibilities of educating incarcerated students and students who are former inmates.
  • "Immigration policy: When good men do nothing." Economist, June 30th-July 6th, 2018, pp. 23-25.
    Reviews the history of America's immigration system. Considers why repeated attempts at immigration reform have failed.
  • "Public transport: Missing the bus." Economist, June 23rd-29th, 2018, pp. 52-53.
    Reports the demand for mass public transport in many affluent cities is declining. States public transport is unlikely to disappear, despite fierce competition from ride-hailing, cycling, and driving options.
  • "How Obama K-12 policies have fared under Trump." By Andrew Ujifusa. Education Week, June 20, 2018, p. 20.
    Looks at which education policies initiated during the Obama administration have been "tossed out," are "on the hot seat," or are "safe for now" since President Trump took office.
  • "Arming teachers with guns?" By Matthew Choi. Fort Worth Business Press, July 2-8, 2018, pp. 11, 21, 23.
    Discusses the recent unveiling of a high tech classroom at West Texas A&M University that will help prepare teachers for active shooting events. Features Virtual Emergency Operations Center Internet software, which enables the coordination between school districts, city services, and emergency responders.
  • "Blockchain & cryptocurrency – two roads converge." By Justin E. Hobson. Journal of MultiState Taxation and Incentives, July 2018, pp. 40-41.
    Provides background and discusses the current regulatory environment of blockchain technology and cryptocurrency, such as Bitcoin.
  • "Fighting words." By Andrew Marantz. New Yorker, July 2, 2018, pp. 34-40, 42-43.
    Explores how college campuses are balancing free speech rights with campus safety in an era when some speakers are intentionally provocative. Highlights the University of California, Berkeley's 2017 efforts to manage an event by Milo Yiannopoulos.
  • "Small systems: Solar energy powers remote water systems." By Craig Patterson, et al. Opflow, June 2018, pp. 24-26.
    Describes an Environmental Protection Agency project in Puerto Rico that proved the viability of using solar energy to power small community water systems.
  • "Eight state commission chairs on state and future of power." Public Utilities Fortnightly, June 15, 2018, pp. 9-23, 46.
    Provides short interviews with eight state utility commission chairs, including Chairman DeeAnn Walker from the Public Utility Commission of Texas. Discusses the future of the power industry.
  • "Did they forget the Alamo?" By W. Scott Bailey. San Antonio Business Journal, July 6, 2018, p. 4.
    Questions how cuts to state funding to promote tourism in Texas will affect cities like San Antonio, which rely heavily on tourism dollars.
  • "Remodeling Medicaid." By Joey Berlin. Texas Medicine, July 2018, pp. 16-21.
    Shares success stories in implementing value-based payment models within managed care organizations in Texas Medicaid.
  • "Unmatched talent." By Sean Price. Texas Medicine, July 2018, pp. 22-26.
    Considers alternative licensing programs for physicians who have not matched into residency training due to a shortage of residency positions. Notes that five states have passed legislation to create such programs.
  • "EIA pegs lowest fossil fuel consumption since 1994." Texas Public Power, June 2018, pp. 6, 9.
    Highlights the Energy Information Administration's [EIA] recent findings that the electric power industry's consumption of fossil fuels in 2017 was the lowest since 1994. Related information at: https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=33543.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, July 12

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Examine the relationships among opioid use, unemployment, and poverty levels. (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, June 29, 2018)
  • Explore the efforts over time to preserve the Declaration of Independence. (Popular Mechanics, July 3, 2018)
  • Discover the differences between serving sizes and portion control. (Cooking Light, July 3, 2018)
  • Consider the effects of alcohol on pedestrians. (Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), July 5, 2018)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "Under questioning." By Kevin Davis. ABA Journal: The Lawyer's Magazine, July 2018, pp. 36-43.
    Discusses the Chicago police legacy of extracting false confessions. Notes the city has paid more than $500 million in the past decade to settle misconduct and wrongful conviction lawsuits.
  • "Austin finds new weapon to combat lack of affordable housing." By Marissa Luck. Austin Business Journal, June 29, 2018, p. A8.
    Explains how Habitat for Humanity was able to use a "super density bonus" ordinance to increase the number of affordable housing units the organization is building in a transit-oriented development [TOD] district. Suggests the same concept could be applied in other TOD districts throughout the city.
  • "Detention centers are big business." By Alex Wayne, Jonathan Levin, and Jennifer Epstein. Bloomberg Businessweek, June 25, 2018, pp. 38-39.
    Explores how the zero-tolerance immigration policy led to an increase in children being placed in the custody of federal authorities, driving the need for more detention centers.
  • "New farm bill could shift funds for states." By Leslie Haymon. Capitol Ideas, May/June 2018, pp. 18-21.
    Previews significant changes to federal agricultural programs in the renewal of the farm bill in Congress, including the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, support for agricultural producers, rural broadband, and the Conservation Stewardship Program. Includes a title-by-title guide to the farm bill. Related information at: https://agriculture.house.gov/farmbill/ and https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/2.
  • "Should cryptocurrencies be regulated like securities?" By Diego Zuluaga. CATO Briefing Papers, June 25, 2018, pp. 1-6.
    Discusses the negative consequences of subjecting cryptocurrencies to onerous securities registration requirements.
  • "Home ownership: A fading hope for many in DFW." By Bill Hethcock. Dallas Business Journal, June 22, 2018, pp. 16-18.
    Discusses factors that have shifted a large percentage of home buyers into the rental market. Notes the median sales price for an existing home in the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington market has increased by 33 percent in just three years, and the wait time for a newly constructed home has doubled. Related information at: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/07/19/more-u-s-households-are-renting-than-at-any-point-in-50-years/.
  • "Cities: In praise of gentrification." Economist, June 23rd-29th, 2018, pp. 23-24.
    Extols the benefits of gentrification, highlighting studies that rebut the association between gentrification and displacement. Considers the reasons for the antipathy towards gentrification.
  • "State contracting: Spending — and watching — taxpayer dollars." Fiscal Notes, June/July 2018, pp. 7-10.
    Discusses the state's purchasing system, procurement policy and training, increased Comptroller oversight as a result of SB20, 84th Legislature and SB533, 85th Legislature, R.S., and the Legislative Budget Board's contract database.
  • "Women in the Texas workforce: State economy depends on women's success." By Brian Wellborn. Fiscal Notes, June/July 2018, pp. 1, 3-6.
    Highlights the economic impact of Texas women by industrial sector.
  • "How Texas hospitals help patients craft an end-of-life plan." By Mary Ann Roser. Internet Resource, May/June 2018, pp. 1-2.
    Considers increasing interdisciplinary efforts by Texas hospitals to improve end-of-life care for patients and their families. Points out the work of the Palliative Care Interdisciplinary Advisory Council, authorized by HB1874, 84th Legislature.
  • "Abortion-related adverse events by facility type." By Carolyn L. Westhoff and Anne R. Davis. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), June 26, 2018, pp. 2481-2482.
    Examines a study that found little difference in the occurrence of abortion-related morbidities and adverse events at ambulatory surgery centers vs. office-based settings. Highlights HB2, 83rd Legislature, 2nd C.S., as a case study of overly restrictive law that provides no discernible safety benefits.
  • "Evaluation of occupational exposure limits for heat stress in outdoor workers — United States, 2011–2016." By Aaron W. Tustin, et al. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), July 6, 2018, pp. 1-5.
    Reports that heat-related deaths can occur in temperatures in the mid-80s Fahrenheit for outdoor workers, not just at higher temperatures. Recommends that employers implement acclimatization programs, training to recognize heat stress symptoms and to deliver first aid, and provision of rest breaks, shade, and water.
  • "EIA: Gulf Coast port limitations may drive crude export costs higher." By Nick Snow. Oil and Gas Journal, June 4, 2018, p. 34.
    Reports that the Energy Information Administration has found that crude oil export costs could rise due to limited tanker loading capacities at Gulf Coast onshore ports that are unable to accommodate the largest of crude carriers. Related information at: https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=36232.
  • "State-of-the-art wildfire protection: When a utility is challenged by broader resilience responsibility." Public Utilities Fortnightly, June 1, 2018, pp. 20-25.
    Provides a Q&A with the president of a gas and electric utility in California regarding ways the utility has adapted to various challenges from wildfires.
  • "The U.S. needs more immigrants." By Jack Goldstone. Reason, August/September 2018, pp. 54-58.
    Argues young workers are a key economic resource, and the United States needs immigrants to provide this resource in sufficient numbers for a vibrant economy.
  • "See-through solar cells could power offices." By Robert F. Service. Science, June 29, 2018, p. 1386.
    Discusses the technology and energy efficiency behind solar windows that could be used in commercial and residential construction.
  • "Market design change approved." Texas Public Power, June 2018, pp. 4-5, 7.
    Reports that ERCOT's board of directors has approved an adjustment in response to the Public Utility Commission's directive to revise the Operating Reserve Demand Curve. Summarizes the 2017 State of the Market Report for the ERCOT Electricity Markets. Related information at: http://interchange.puc.texas.gov/Search/Filings?UtilityType=A&ControlNumber=47199&
    ItemMatch=Equal&DocumentType=ALL&SortOrder=Ascending
    . Report at: https://www.potomaceconomics.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/2017-State-of-the-Market-Report.pdf.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, June 28

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Read about the U.S. Supreme Court's decision related to cell phone location tracking and Fourth Amendment rights. (Electronic Frontier Foundation, June 22, 2018)
  • Consider recent facts about the death penalty in the U.S. and around the world. (Pew Research Center, June 27, 2018)
  • Check on the water quality before heading to Texas' beaches. (Texas General Land Office, accessed June 27, 2018)
  • Review the 2018 Kids Count Data Book. (Annie E. Casey Foundation, June 27, 2018)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Investigations, subpoenas, fines: City unveils details on how new sick-leave ordinance could be enforced." By Daniel Salazar. Austin Business Journal, June 22, 2018, p. 10.
    Discusses the proposed rules for implementing the administrative, investigation, and civil penalty assessment provisions of Austin's Earned Sick Time ordinance, which becomes effective beginning October 1, 2018. Related document at: http://www.austintexas.gov/edims/document.cfm?id=300812
  • "Four states with robust prescription drug monitoring programs reduced opioid dosages." By Rebecca L. Haffajee, et al. Health Affairs, June 2018, pp. 964-974.
    Examines state prescription drug monitoring programs [PDMPs] and the implementation by four states of robust registration and use mandates. Reports that robust PDMPs may be able to significantly reduce opioid dosages dispensed, percentages of patients receiving opioids, and high-risk prescribing. 
  • "Wind and solar energy will keep power prices low and avoid blackouts." By Meghan Nutting. Houston Business Journal, June 15, 2018, p. 42.
    Examines the advantages of renewable energy technologies over older, costlier, and polluting technologies. Discusses how solar energy can reduce the likelihood of blackouts during heat waves and how wind farms can operate during heavy storms to deliver continuous power. 
  • "Many recommend teaching mental health in schools. Now two states will require it." By Christine Vestal. Internet Resource, June 15, 2018, pp. 1-7.
    Discusses the inclusion of mental health education in public schools. Reports New York recently enacted legislation that requires mental health instruction in K-12 grades; Virginia now requires it in the ninth and tenth grades. Notes Texas is one of twenty states that does not require counselors in public schools.
  • "Redefining disability." By Robert Verbruggen. National Review, June 25, 2018, pp. 30-32.
    Argues the current disability system needs to be reformed. Explores the advantages of temporary or partial benefits and of holding employers accountable for their workers' claims. 
  • "Under fire." By Jim Geraghty. National Review, June 25, 2018, pp. 16-17.
    Reviews the National Rifle Association's successes and setbacks in furthering their agenda at both the federal and state levels. 
  • "Security: Technology advances expand water system security options." By Nelson Mix, et al.  Opflow, May 2018, pp. 10-14.
    Profiles several enhanced technologies that provide new opportunities for water utilities to upgrade and improve security monitoring.
  • "The economic forecast for Texas." By M. Ray Perryman. Perryman Report and Texas Letter, Vol. 35, No. 4, pp. 1-3, 6.
    Presents the state's economic forecast for the next five years. Indicates the state economy will continue its upward trend and will outpace the national economy. 
  • "We're still competing: Perspectives on competition from regulation veteran." Public Utilities Fortnightly, June 1, 2018, pp. 32-35.
    Shares the perspective of the former Texas Public Utilities Commission Chair Barry Smitherman regarding competition and transmission in the energy market, as well as the future of the electric power industry. Related document at: https://www.ferc.gov/industries/electric/indus-act/trans-plan.asp
  • "Innocent until proven guilty, but only if you can pay." By Scott Shackford. Reason, August/September 2018, pp. 22-29.
    Discusses the cash bail system, which makes it more likely that poor defendants will be imprisoned while they await trial. Explains various attempts at reform, including the recent Harris County lawsuit, and identifies unintended consequences that might occur. Related document at: http://www.ca5.uscourts.gov/opinions/pub/17/17-20333-CV0.pdf
  • "Lien on me." By John Council. Texas Lawyer, July 2018, pp. 24-26.
    Comments on recent Texas Supreme Court decision, In re North Cypress Medical Center Operating Co., Ltd., relating to medical billing disputes. Considers the decision's impact on health care price transparency. Related document at: https://lrl.texas.gov/scanned/archive/2018/38419.pdf
  • "TMA: TMB should stop hiding experts' reviews of complaints." By Joey Berlin. Texas Medicine, June 2018, pp. 12-13.
    Reports on the Texas Medical Association's [TMA] testimony before the Sunset Advisory Commission's April hearing on the Texas Medical Board [TMB]. Highlights the TMA's recommendations for amending how the TMB handles complaints against physicians. 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, June 21

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Explore housing and homeownership trends. (Joint Center for Housing Studies, June 2018)
  • Review the definitions of "rural" in the Texas statutes and rules. (Texas Legislative Council, June 2018)
  • Consider the economic aspects of groundwater in Texas. (Texas Water Journal, May 21, 2018)
  • Explore sheriffs' fees by county. (Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, accessed June 21, 2018)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Solar energy: On the solarcoaster." Economist, June 16th-22nd, 2018, pp. 53-55.
    Examines whether the global solar (photovoltaic) industry can survive without subsidies.
  • "Voting: Multiple choice." Economist, June 16th-22nd, 2018, pp. 21-22.
    Discusses Maine's first statewide election using ranked-choice voting [RCV], where voters rank the entire field by preference, from first to last, rather than voting for a single candidate. Considers the pros and cons of RCV elections.
  • "Ready for shooter? Some school police say no." By Evie Blad. Education Week, June 6, 2018, pp. 1, 11-13.
    Discusses results of national survey conducted of school resource officers by Education Week Research Center. Reports on how prepared these officers feel they are for active-shooter situations in schools. Mentions Governor Greg Abbott. Report at: https://www.edweek.org/media/school-resource-officer-survey-copyright-education-week.pdf
  • "Schools see new dilemma in teens who cyberbully themselves." By Sasha Jones. Education Week, May 30, 2018, p. 18.
    Addresses digital self-harm in schools, a new form of expression that some students are using to cope with emotional pain and self-hatred. Discusses the difficulty school officials are having assisting students who are cyberbullying themselves.
  • "Frequent emergency department users: A statewide comparison before and after Affordable Care Act implementation." By Shannon McConville, et al. Health Affairs, June 2018, pp. 881-889.
    Reports that the likelihood of being a frequent emergency department [ED] user decreased in the two years following implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Notes that the largest predictors of frequent ED use included having a diagnosis of a mental health condition or a substance use disorder.
  • "Texas residents’ views on state and national health policy priorities." By Liz Hamel, et al. Internet Resource, June 2018, pp. 1-16.
    Reports that according to a 2018 Texas Health Policy Survey, over half of Texans wanted the state legislature to increase spending on health care programs, and two-thirds of Texans said the state should expand its Medicaid program and better ensure that low-income adults can get the health care they need.
  • "The ethics of Medicaid's work requirements and other personal responsibility policies." By Harald Schmidt and Allison K. Hoffman. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), June 12, 2018, pp. 2265-2266.
    Recommends safeguards the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services should put in place for states implementing work requirements, to ensure they are prioritizing protecting health over political goals.
  • "Vital signs: Trends in state suicide rates — United States, 1999–2016 and circumstances contributing to suicide — 27 states, 2015." By Deborah M. Stone, et al. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), June 8, 2018, pp. 1-8.
    Reports that during 1999-2016, suicide rates increased in nearly every state. Includes a map that indicates Texas' rate increased in the 19 to 30 percent range.
  • "Finished water: Zero-discharge treatment plant converts brackish wastewater to extend Texas drinking water supply." Opflow, May 2018, p. 40.
    Highlights the El Paso Full Recovery Desalination Plant.
  • "Multiservice utilities: A one-stop shop for communities." Public Power, May-June 2018, pp. 28, 30-32.
    Explores benefits and challenges to public power utilities that are multiservice providers for their communities.
  • "How to (legally) make your own off-the-books handgun." By Mark McDaniel. Reason, July 2018, pp. 47-52.
    Discusses the considerations the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives uses in determining whether specific gun parts fall under the definition of a firearm. Provides instructions for assembling a Glock 17 handgun and suggests debates over gun control that focus on commercial manufacture may be futile when considering such homemade weapons.
  • "Federal bill would limit opioid scrips for acute pain." By Joey Berlin. Texas Medicine, June 2018, pp. 42-44.
    Discusses proposed three-day limit on opioid prescriptions for acute pain that is part of United States Senate Bill 2456, also known as the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) 2.0. Includes opinions from pain doctors on the measure.
  • "Rate case scheduling rule adopted." Texas Public Power, May 2018, p. 4.
    Provides an update on a rule the Public Utilities Commission of Texas adopted at their April 12 meeting. Related information at: http://www.puc.texas.gov/agency/rulesnlaws/subrules/electric/25.247/47545adt.pdf
  • "System benefit repeal." Texas Public Power, May 2018, pp. 4-5.
    Reports that the Public Utilities Commission of Texas approved a proposal repealing and amending rules regarding the System Benefit Fund, which was previously eliminated by the Legislature. Related information at: https://www.puc.texas.gov/industry/projects/electric/47343/47343adt.pdf

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, June 14

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Explore health system performance in Texas. (The Commonwealth Fund, ©2018)
  • Examine human trafficking laws and support systems for survivors. (National Conference of State Legislatures, May 31, 2018)
  • Read about electronic storage detection dogs. (CNET, June 11, 2018)
  • Track drought conditions in Texas. (Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, June 2018)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Defendant's choice." By Lorelei Laird. ABA Journal: The Lawyer's Magazine, June 2018, pp. 18-19.
    Highlights the results of Comal County's experiment to let indigent clients choose their own court-approved lawyer instead of using the traditional "wheel" system in which the next lawyer on the list is appointed.
  • "Assessing the House opioid package's Medicaid bills: While some advance access to treatment, one raises serious concerns." By Anna Bailey, et al. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, June 11, 2018, pp. 1-7.
    Summarizes several bills in the United States House of Representatives that would address the opioid epidemic. Discusses potential changes to Medicaid that could improve substance use disorder provider capacity and reduce insurance coverage gaps.
  • "Medicine: From A&E to AI." Economist, June 9th-15th, 2018, pp. 68-69.
    Reports on several projects that aim to use artificial intelligence to improve diagnoses and the speed and precision of medical treatments.
  • "Santa Fe shooting sparks debate on school design." By Evie Blad. Education Week, May 30, 2018, p. 13.
    Discusses the design of architecturally safer schools in light of the recent shooting at Santa Fe High School. Addresses both unobtrusive safety measures and aggressive physical security measures. Mentions Lt. Governor Dan Patrick.
  • "Interpreting the complexities of the cooperative 'fix.'" Ethanol Today, May/June 2018, pp. 16-17.
    Examines the change to Section 199A in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017. Related information at: https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/1/text.
  • "How to prepare your office for an active shooter." By Jackie Ford. Houston Business Journal, June 7, 2018, p. 18.
    Outlines several steps employers can take to reduce the likelihood of workplace violence.
  • "As overdoses climb, emergency departments begin treating opioid use disorder." By Rita Rubin. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), June 5, 2018, pp. 2158-2160.
    Reports on the increase in hospital emergency departments that are undergoing the federally required training to dispense buprenorphine, a drug used to treat opioid use disorder. Explains that without this training, emergency departments could not initiate medication-assisted addiction treatment.
  • "Incarcerated immigrants in 2016: Their numbers, demographics, and countries of origin." By Alex Nowrasteh and Michelangelo Landgrave. Policy Brief (CATO Institute), June 4, 2018, pp. 1-8.
    Finds that immigrants — legal and illegal — are less likely to be incarcerated than native-born Americans. Points out that illegal and legal immigrants who immigrate at a younger age — ages 0 to 17 — are more likely to be incarcerated as adults.
  • "When your community wants renewables: Making changes, meeting demand." By John Egan. Public Power, May-June 2018, pp. 37-41.
    Highlights ways that public power utilities are improving customers' access to renewable power. Includes examples, such as the Georgetown Utility Systems in Georgetown, Texas.
  • "Scientists aim to smoke out wildfire impacts." By Warren Cornwall. Science, June 1, 2018, pp. 948-949.
    Discusses how researchers plan to study wildfire smoke plumes during the summer in the western United States.
  • "Teacher pay is a problem." By Michelle Exstrom. State Legislatures, June 2018, pp. 22-23.
    Considers recent efforts by state legislatures to address teacher salaries and teacher turnover. Notes the percentage of teachers in each state who hold second jobs.
  • "Children with autism left behind by low Medicaid rates." By Michael Ollove. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), June 12, 2018, pp. 1-6.
    Highlights two class action federal lawsuits that may open a new and effective strategy to challenge low Medicaid reimbursement rates, which have a substantial impact on children's access to medically necessary and legally required treatment.
  • "Swat team." By Sean Price. Texas Medicine, June 2018, pp. 20-25.
    Explains the need for better education of and by physicians on vector-borne illnesses (diseases that are spread by bugs). Notes that vector-borne illnesses often are misdiagnosed and are underreported. Cites HB2055, 84th Legislature, and HB3576 and SB570, 85th Legislature, R.S., that addressed these problems (and notes setbacks with funding and vetoes).
  • "Pension fund health relies on employer contributions." By Max Patterson. TEXPERS Pension Observer, Vol. 2 2018, pp. 5, 7.
    Highlights a recent Texas Public Policy Foundation panel on public pension reform, which included Representative Dan Flynn and Senator Royce West.
  • "This man wants to be on birth control." By Alexandra Sifferlin. Time, June 18, 2018, pp. 38-43.
    Discusses recent research being conducted on new hormonal and non-hormonal contraceptive methods for men.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, June 7

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Examine the current and projected financial status of social security. (Social Security Administration, June 5, 2018)
  • Consider whether pets have a positive impact on people's health. (NIH MedlinePlus, Spring 2018)
  • Read about the Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission decision. (National Conference of State Legislatures, June 4, 2018)
  • Track an increase in federal criminal prosecutions for illegal border crossings. (Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse, Syracuse University, June 4, 2018)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Uncompensated care costs fell in nearly every state as ACA's major coverage provisions took effect." By Jessica Schubel and Matt Broaddus. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, May 23, 2018, pp. 1-9.
    Explains Medicaid expansion has helped lower uncompensated health care costs, benefiting patients, hospitals, and state budgets, and warns of the effect of proposed Medicaid work requirements. Charts uncompensated care costs and medically uninsured rates in the 50 states from 2013 to 2015.
  • "A state multi-sector framework for supporting children and youth with special health care needs." Child Trends, May 2018, pp. 1-26 (Note Length).
    Describes a four-part state framework for supporting children and youth with special health care needs from birth through age 17, including health, family support, education and employment, and law enforcement and juvenile justice.
  • "The future of tech startups: Into the danger zone." Economist, June 2nd-8th, 2018, pp. 55-57.
    Reports how the dominance of technology giants such as Amazon, Facebook, and Google has had a meaningful effect on entrepreneurial innovation, as the bigger firms can quickly launch competing services that put startups out of business.
  • "Justice: Data detectives." Economist Technology Quarterly, June 2nd, 2018, pp. 3-12.
    Examines the promise and dangers of new technologies that are transforming the way criminal justice systems operate, including street-level surveillance, electronic monitoring, and predictive policing and sentencing.
  • "Rural districts take a 24 percent hit in Algebra II enrollment." By Hector Bojorquez. IDRA Newsletter (Intercultural Development Research Association), May 2018, pp. 3-4.
    Discusses the findings of the IDRA Ready Texas Study, which examined the early effects of the new graduation requirements imposed by HB5, 83rd Legislature, Regular Session.
  • "State & local tax contributions of young undocumented immigrants." By Misha Hill and Meg Wiehe. Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, Updated April 2018, pp. 1-18.
    Examines state and local tax contributions of undocumented immigrants currently enrolled or eligible for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.
  • "The neurobiology of opioid addiction and the potential for prevention strategies." By Gary Peltz and Thomas C. Südhof. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), May 22/29, 2018, pp. 2071-2072.
    Calls for a public health prevention strategy to address the opioid crisis, rather than the current focus on the later stages of drug addiction.
  • "Focusing the lens on film credits." By Brett Johnson and Bruce Kessler. Journal of MultiState Taxation and Incentives, June 2018, pp. 33-35.
    Summarizes recent developments in film incentives programs in Louisiana, New York, California, and Georgia, including eligibility requirements and benefits, credit monetization, and state oversight.
  • "AARP in the states: Texas." National Institute on Retirement Security, April 2018, pp. 1-8.
    Presents infographic fact sheets on the Employees Retirement System of Texas and Teacher Retirement System of Texas, and highlights the economic impact of Texas public pensions.
  • "The teaching moment." By Rivka Galchen. New Yorker, June 4 & 11, 2018, pp. 38-43.
    Highlights the recent teacher walkout in Oklahoma and the failed attempt at winning legislative approval for additional education funding. Explains this failure has provoked people to get involved in local politics and to run for office.
  • "Abolish ICE." By Shikha Dalmia. Reason, July 2018, pp. 10-11.
    Reviews the history of deportation efforts back to the Clinton administration and the creation of Immigration and Customs Enforcement [ICE] after 9/11. Argues that ICE and the deportation program should be abolished and the true hardcore criminals from other countries should be handled through regular law enforcement procedures.
  • "Speaking out: Four Price, State Representative, District 87." Texas Builder, May/June 2018, pp. 22-25.
    Interviews State Representative Four Price about the skilled labor shortage in Texas, workforce and job training programs, water and road infrastructure, and the state budget process.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

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