LRL Home - Points of Interest - Texas history

Legislative Families: Grandchildren, Cousins, In-Laws, and More!

In previous posts on legislative families, we have looked at legislative spouses, siblings, and parents/children. In the final post, we are highlighting the extended family. Many legislators come from families that have devoted countless hours of time and energy to the Texas Legislature. See who has followed in legislative family footsteps over the generations.*

  • Barclay-Lindsey family

    • James Walter Barclay served in the House, 1859–1866 (8th–10th)

      • father-in-law to Dave Lindsey, grandfather to John Lindsey
    • David Sudduth Lindsey served in the House, 1893–1897 (23rd–24th)
      • son-in-law to James Barclay, father to John Lindsey
    • John Lindsey served in the House, 1921–1923 (37th)
      • son to Dave Lindsey, grandson to James Barclay

  • Bee-Tarver family

    • Hamilton Prioleau Bee served in the House, 1851–1859 (3rd–7th)

      • brother-in-law to Edward Tarver, father of Carlos Bee
    • Edward Rex Tarver served in the House, 1895–1897 (24th), 1899–1900 (26th)
      • brother-in-law to Hamilton Bee, uncle to Carlos Bee
    • Carlos Bee served in the Senate, 1915–1919 (34th–35th)
      • son to Hamilton Bee, nephew to Edward Tarver

  • Benavides family

    • Bacilio Benavides served in the House, 1859–1861 (8th)

      • uncle to Santos Benavides
    • Santos Benavides served in the House, 1879–1885 (16th–18th)
      • nephew to Bacilio Benavides

  • Blount-Owsley family

    • J.M. Blount served in the Senate, 1866–1870 (11th)

      • father to James P. Blount
    • James P. Blount served in the House, 1885–1887 (19th)
      • son to J.M. Blount, brother-in-law to J.G. Kearby
    • J.G. Kearby served in the Senate, 1891–1895 (22nd–23rd)
      • brother-in-law to James P. Blount
    • Alvin Clark Owsley served in the House, 1889–1892 (21st–22nd), and 1895–1897 (24th)
      • father to Alvin M. Owsley, son-in-law to J.M. Blount, brother-in-law to James P. Blount
    • Alvin M. Owsley served in the House, 1913–1915 (33rd)
      • son to Alvin C. Owsley, nephew to James P. Blount, grandson to J.M. Blount

  • Bourland-Day-Manion family

    • William H. Bourland served in the House, 1846–1849 (1st–2nd), and 1853–1855 (5th)

      • brother to James Bourland
    • James G. Bourland served in the Senate, 1846–1849 (1st–2nd)
      • brother to William H. Bourland, father-in-law to Samuel Day and A.B. Manion
    • Samuel Day served in the House, 1873–1874 (13th)
      • son-in-law to James Bourland, brother-in-law to Austin Brooks Manion
    • Austin Brooks Manion served in the House, 1876–1879 (15th)
      • son-in-law to James Bourland, brother-in-law to Samuel Day

  • Burleson-Loyd-Negley family

    • Edward Burleson served in the Senate, 1846–1851 (1st–4th)

      • great-uncle to A.J. Loyd, great-grandfather to Laura Burleson Negley
    • Andrew Jackson Loyd served in the House, 1899–1901 (26th)
      • great-nephew to Edward Burleson
    • Laura Burleson Negley served in the House, 1929–1931 (41st)
      • great-granddaughter to Edward Burleson

  • Camp family

    • John Lafayette Camp, Sr. served in the Senate, 1874–1875 (14th)

      • father to John L. Camp, Jr., grandfather to W. Nunnelee Camp
    • John Lafayette Camp, Jr. served in the Senate, 1885–1889 (19th–20th)
      • son to John L. Camp, Sr., uncle to W. Nunnelee Camp
    • W. Nunnelee Camp served in the House, 1911–1912 (32nd)
      • nephew to John L. Camp, Jr., grandson to John L. Camp, Sr.

  • Canales family

    • José Tomás Canales served in the House, 1905–1911 (29th–31st) and 1917–1921 (35th–36th)

      • uncle to Terry Canales, great-uncle to Gabi Canales and Terry A. Canales
    • Terry A. Canales served in the House, 1973–1977 (63rd–64th)
      • father to Gabi Canales and Terry A. Canales, nephew to J.T. Canales
    • Gabi Canales served in the House, 2003–2005 (78th)
      • daughter of Terry A. Canales, sister of Terry Canales, great-niece to J.T. Canales
    • Terry Canales serves in the House, 2013–present (83rd–86th)
      • son of Terry A. Canales, brother of Gabi Canales, great-nephew to J.T. Canales

  • Cocke family

    • Frederick Bird Smith Cocke, Sr. served in the House, 1861–1863 (9th), and 1879–1881 (16th)

      • father to Fred Cocke, Jr. and J.R. Cocke, grandfather to William A. Cocke
    • James Rogers Cocke served in the House, 1893–1897 (23rd–24th)
      • son to Frederick Cocke, Sr., brother to Fred Cocke, Jr., uncle to William A. Cocke
    • Frederick Bird Smith Cocke, Jr. served in the House, 1899–1901 (26th)
      • son to Frederick Cocke, Sr., brother to J.R. Cocke, uncle to William A. Cocke
    • William Alexander Cocke served in the House, 1907–1909 (30th)
      • grandson to Frederick Cocke, Sr., nephew to J.R. Cocke and Fred Cocke, Jr.

  • Crabb family

    • Hillary Crabb served in the House, 1853 (4th) and 1855–1857 (6th)

      • great-grandfather to Joe Crabb
    • Joe Crabb served in the House, 1993–2011 (73rd–81st)
      • great-grandson to Hillary Crabb

  • Cuellar-Martinez family

    • Renato Cuellar served in the House, 1987–1997 (70th–74th)

      • uncle to Armando Martinez
    • Armando Martinez serves in the House, 2005–present (79th–86th)
      • nephew to Renato Cuellar

  • Daniel family

    • Price Daniel, Sr. served in the House, 1939–1945 (46th–48th)

      • brother to Bill Daniel, father to Price Daniel, Jr.
    • Bill Daniel served in the House, 1949–1955 (51st–53rd)
      • brother to Price Daniel, Sr., uncle to Price Daniel, Jr.
    • Price Daniel, Jr. served in the House, 1969–1975 (61st–63rd)
      • son to Price Daniel, Sr., nephew to Bill Daniel

  • De La Garza family

    • Eligio De La Garza served in the House, 1953–1965 (53rd–58th)

      • uncle to Eddie De La Garza
    • Eddie De La Garza served in the House, 1991–1997 (72nd–74th)
      • nephew to Eligio De La Garza

  • Dies family

    • W.W. Dies served in the House, 1897–1901 (25th–26th)

      • uncle to Martin Dies, Jr.
    • Martin Dies served in the Senate, 1959–1967 (56th–59th)
      • nephew to W.W. Dies

  • Dougherty-Leo family

    • Edward Dougherty served in the House, 1859–1861 (8th)

      • father-in-law to Alexander Leo, Jr.
    • Alexander Leo, Jr. served in the House, 1883 (18th)
      • son-in-law to Edward Dougherty

  • Dunnam family

    • W.V. Dunnam, Sr. served in the House, 1917–1919 (35th)

      • grandfather to Jim Dunnam
    • Jim Dunnam served in the House, 1997–2011 (75th–81st)
      • grandson to W.V. Dunnam

  • Durant family

    • John Durant served in the Senate, 1861–1866 (9th–10th)

      • uncle to William Durant
    • William Durant served in the House, 1883–1885 (18th)
      • nephew to John Durant

  • Farrar-Duff family

    • Bowd Farrar served in the House, 1925–1933 (39th–42nd)

      • uncle to Virginia Duff
    • Virginia Elizabeth Duff served in the House, 1951–1963 (52nd–57th)
      • niece to Bowd Farrar

  • Faubion family

    • James Henry Faubion served in the House, 1885–1891 (19th–21st), 1893–1895 (23rd), and in the Senate, 1903–1905 (28th)

      • uncle to H.E. Faubion
    • Herbert Elmo Faubion served in the House, 1919–1925 (36th–38th)
      • nephew to J.H. Faubion

  • Few-Lewis family

    • William Allen Few served in the House, 1933–1934 (43rd)

      • father-in-law to Don A. Lewis
    • Donald A. Lewis served in the House, 1947–1951 (50th–51st)
      • son-in-law to W.A. Few

  • Fowler family

    • John H. Fowler served in the House, 1853–1855 (5th)

      • great-uncle to G.R. Fowler
    • Godfrey Rees Fowler served in the House, 1903–1905 (28th)
      • great-nephew to John H. Fowler

  • Fly family

    • George Washington Lafayette Fly served in the House, 1881–1883 (17th)

      • father to William Madden Fly, grandfather to William Stoner Fly
    • William Madden Fly served in the House, 1915–1923 (34th–37th), and 1926–1929 (39th–40th)
      • son to George Washington Lafayette Fly, uncle to William Stoner Fly
    • William Stoner Fly served in the House, 1947–1953 (50th–52nd), and in the Senate, 1954–1961 (53rd–56th)
      • grandson to George Washington Lafayette Fly, nephew to William Madden Fly

  • Garrison-Carter-Sanford family

    • Caleb Jackson Garrison served in the House, 1876–1881 (15th–16th), and 1883–1885 (18th), and in the Senate, 1885–1889 (20th)

      • brother to T.S. Garrison, uncle to E.H. Carter, great-uncle to Gary B. Sanford
    • Thomas Smith Garrison served in the House, 1897–1899 (25th)
      • brother to C.J. Garrison, uncle to E.H. Carter, grandfather to Gary B. Sanford
    • E.H. Carter served in the Senate, 1911–1914 (32nd–33rd)
      • nephew to C.J. and T.S. Garrison, cousin-once-removed to Gary B. Sanford
    • Gary Bonner Sanford served in the House, 1922–1927 (37th–39th)
      • grandson to T.S. Garrison, great-nephew to C.J. Garrison, cousin-once-removed to E.H. Carter

  • Guinn-Hearne family

    • Robert Guinn served in the Senate, 1853–1870 (5th–11th)

      • brother-in-law to D.T. Hearne
    • D.T. Hearne served in the House, 1883–1887 (18th–19th)
      • brother-in-law to Robert Guinn

  • Hamilton-Perry-Ratliff family

    • David Henry Hamilton served in the House, 1893–1895 (23rd)

      • great-great-grandfather to Rick Perry
    • Rick Perry served in the House, 1985–1991 (69th–71st)
      • great-great-grandson to D.H. Hamilton
    • Dennis Pace Ratliff served in the House, 1931–1935 (42nd–43rd)
      • grandfather-in-law to Rick Perry

  • Hogg family Gov. James Hogg is Joseph's son and Mike's father.

    • Joseph Lewis Hogg served in the Senate, 1846 (1st)

      • grandfather to Mike Hogg
    • Mike Hogg served in the House, 1927–1931 (40th–41st)
      • grandson to Joseph L. Hogg

  • Holland family William is believed to be one of Bird Holland's sons by an enslaved woman. Bird bought the brothers' freedom and took them to Ohio.

    • Spearman Holland served in the House, 1846–1847 (1st), 1857–1859 (7th), and 1861–1863 (9th), and in the Senate, 1863–1866 (10th)

      • brother to Bird Holland, father to James Holland, uncle^ to William Holland
    • Bird Holland served in the House, 1853–1855 (5th)
      • brother to Spearman Holland, father^ to William Holland, uncle to James Holland
    • William H. Holland served in the House, 1876–1879 (15th)
      • son^ to Bird Holland, nephew^ to Spearman Holland, cousin^ to James Holland
    • James K. Holland served in the House, 1849–1851 (3rd), and 1863 (9th), and in the Senate, 1853–1855 (5th)
      • son to Spearman Holland, nephew to Bird Holland, cousin^ to William Holland

  • Jackson-Denny family

    • Robert Hal Jackson served in the House, 1947–1951 (50th–51st)

      • second cousin to Mary Denny
    • Mary Denny served in the House, 1993–2007 (1993–2007)
      • second cousin to Robert Hal Jackson

  • Jolley-Bock family

    • James Jolley served in the House, 1885–1887 (19th)

      • great-grandfather to Bennie Bock II
    • Bennie Bock II served in the House, 1973–983 (63rd–67th)
      • great-grandson to James Jolley

  • Jones-Mills family

    • Henry Jones served in the House, 1846–1847 (1st)

      • father-in-law to Roger Quarles Mills, grandfather to Charles Mills
    • Roger Quarles Mills served in the House, 1859–1861 (8th)
      • son-in-law to Henry Jones, father to Charles Mills
    • Charles H. Mills served in the House, 1913–1915 (33rd)
      • son to Roger Quarles Mills, grandson to Henry Jones

  • Jones family

    • Wiley Jones served in the House, 1863–1866

      • father-in-law to John Mathis
    • John Manson Mathis served in the House, 1918–1919 (35th), and 1931–1935 (42nd–43rd)
      • son-in-law to Wiley Jones

  • Jones family

    • Benjamin Franklin Jones served in the House, 1879–1881 (16th)

      • brother to Charles H. Jones and W.H. Jones, father to J.S. Jones
    • Charles Hill Jones served in the House, 1866–1870 (11th)
      • brother to Benjamin Jones and W.H. Jones, uncle to J.S. Jones
    • William H. Jones served in the House, 1876–1879 (15th), and 1885–1887 (19th)
      • brother to Benjamin Jones and Charles H. Jones, uncle to J.S. Jones
    • James Slaughter Jones served in the House, 1901–1903 (27th)
      • son to Benjamin Jones, nephew to Charles H. Jones and W.H. Jones

  • Lea-Boothe family

    • Pryor Lea served in the Senate, 1861–1866 (9th–10th)

      • grandfather-in-law to Joseph Boothe
    • Joseph Boothe served in the House, 1887–1889 (20th)
      • grandson-in-law to Pryor Lea

  • Mauritz-Patman family

    • Fred Mauritz served in the House, 1935–1939 (44th–45th), and in the Senate, 1941–1947 (47th–50th)

      • father-in-law to Bill Patman
    • William N. Patman served in the Senate, 1961–1981 (57th–66th)
      • son-in-law to Fred Mauritz

  • Maverick family

    • Samuel Augustus Maverick served in the House, 1851–1855, and 1859–1863 (8th–9th), and in the Senate, 1855–1859 (6th–7th)

      • great-grandfather to Maury Maverick
    • Maury Maverick served in the House, 1951–1957 (52nd–54th)
      • great-grandson to Samuel Maverick

  • McLane-Pierce family

    • Charles McLane served in the Senate, 1882–1883 (17th)

      • stepfather to C.C. Pierce
    • C.C. Pierce served in the House, 1907–1910 (30th–31st)
      • stepson to Charles McLane

  • Meyer-Gattis family

    • Charles J.H. Meyer served in the House, 1893–1895 (23rd)

      • great-great-grandfather to Dan Gattis
    • Dan Gattis served in the House, 2003–2011 (78th–81st)
      • great-great-grandson to C.J.H. Meyer

  • Mobley family

  • Moursund family

    • Albert W.H. Moursund served in the House, 1881–1885 (17th–18th)

      • father to Anton N. Moursund, grandfather to Albert Moursund III
    • Anton N. Moursund served in the House, 1901–1903 (27th)
      • son to A.W. Moursund, Sr., father to Travis Moursund, uncle to Albert Moursund III
    • Albert Wadel Moursund III served in the House, 1949–1953 (51st–52nd)
      • grandson to A.W. Moursund, Sr., cousin to Travis Moursund
    • Travis Bruce Moursund served in the House, 1927–1929 (40th)
      • son to Anton N. Moursund, grandson to A.W. Moursund, Sr., cousin to Albert Moursund III

  • Munson family

    • Mordello Stephen Munson served in the House, 1857–1861 (7th–8th), 1866–1870 (11th), and 1875–1876 (14th)

      • father to Milam Stephen Munson, Sr., grandfather to Milam Stephen Munson, Jr.
    • Milam Stephen Munson, Sr. served in the House, 1909–1911 (31st)
      • son to Mordello Stephen Munson, father to Milam Stephen Munson, Jr.
    • Milam Stephen Munson, Jr. served in the House, 1931–1935 (42nd–43rd)
      • son to Milam Stephen Munson, Jr., grandson to Mordello Stephen Munson

  • Patton-Jordan family

    • Edward Patton served in the House, 1891–1893 (22nd)

      • great-grandfather to Barbara Jordan
    • Barbara Jordan served in the Senate, 1967–1973 (60th–62nd)
      • great-granddaughter to Edward Patton

  • Perry-Stevenson-Murr family

    • Henry Grady Perry served in the House, 1921–1923 (37th), and 1949–1953 (51st–52nd)

      • father to Wilbur Wright Perry, brother-in-law to Coke Robert Stevenson
    • Wilbur Wright Perry served in the House, 1953–1955 (53rd)
      • son to H. Grady Perry
    • Coke Robert Stevenson served in the House, 1929–1939 (41st–45th)
      • brother-in-law to H. Grady Perry, grandfather to Andrew Murr
    • Andrew Murr serves in the House, 2015–present (84th–86th)
      • grandson to Coke Robert Stevenson

  • Rains-Barrett family

    • Emory Rains served in the House, 1847–1849 (2nd), 1851–1853 (4th–5th), and in the Senate, 1859–1861 (8th)

      • great-uncle to Eli B. Barrett
    • Eli Brown Barrett served in the House, 1921–1925 (37th–38th), and 1933–1935 (43rd)
      • great-nephew to Emory Rains

  • Rowland-Gough family

    • James Franklin Rowland served in the House, 1889–1893 (21st–22nd)

      • uncle to James Rowland Gough
    • James Rowland Gough served in the House, 1891–1897 (22nd–24th), and in the Senate, 1897–1901 (25th–26th)
      • nephew to J.F. Rowland

  • Runnels family

    • Hiram George Runnels elected but never sworn (7th)

      • uncle to Hardin Runnels and Howell Runnels
    • Hardin Richard Runnels served in the House, 1847–1855 (2nd–5th)
      • brother to Howell Runnels, nephew to Hiram G. Runnels
    • Howell Runnels served in the House, 1855–1859 (6th–7th)
      • brother to Hardin Runnels, nephew to Hiram G. Runnels

  • Russell family

    • William Jarvis Russell served in the House, 1849–1851 (3rd)

      • father to William H. Russell, grandfather to W.J. Russell
    • William H. Russell served in the Senate, 1874–1876 (14th)
      • son to William Jarvis Russell, father to W.J. Russell
    • William Jarvis Russell served in the House, 1893–1895 (23rd), and 1899–1905 (26th–28th)
      • son to William H. Russell, grandson to William Jarvis Russell

  • Shepard family

    • James Shepard served in the House, 1850–1851 (3rd), and 1856–1857 (6th)

      • brother to Chauncy Shepard, uncle to Seth Shepard
    • Chauncy Shepard served in the Senate, 1857–1866 (7th–10th)
      • brother to James Shepard, father to Seth Shepard
    • Seth Shepard served in the Senate, 1874–1876 (14th)
      • son to Chauncy Shepard, nephew to James Shepard

  • Stewart family

    • William Henry Stewart served in the House, 1848–1851 (2nd–3rd), and 1859–1861 (8th)

      • grandfather to Maco Stewart, Jr., great-grandfather to Maco Stewart III
    • Maco Stewart, Jr. served in the House, 1923–1925 (38th)
      • father to Maco Stewart III, grandson to William H. Stewart
    • Maco Stewart III served in the House, 1961–1963 (57th)
      • son to Maco Stewart, Jr., great-grandson to William H. Stewart

  • Stollenwerck family

  • Tarlton-Morrow-Farenthold family

    • Benjamin Tarlton served in the House, 1881–1883 (17th), and 1885–1887 (19th)

      • brother-in-law to W.C. Morrow, grandfather to Frances "Sissy" Farenthold
    • W.C. Morrow served in the Senate, 1913–1917 (33rd–34th)
      • brother-in-law to Benjamin Tarlton, great-uncle to Frances "Sissy" Farenthold
    • Frances "Sissy" Farenthold served in the House, 1969–1973 (61st–62nd)
      • granddaughter to Benjamin Tarlton, great-niece to W.C. Morrow

  • Terrell family

    • Henry Berryman Terrell served in the House, 1901–1909 (27th–30th), and in the Senate, 1909–1915 (31st–34th)

      • brother to George Terrell, uncle to J. Turney Terrell
    • George Butler Terrell served in the House, 1899–1903 (26th–27th), 1907–1913 (30th–32nd), 1917–1920 (35th–36th), and 1931–1933 (42nd)
      • brother to H.B. Terrell, father to J. Turney Terrell
    • J. Turney Terrell served in the House, 1930–1933 (41st–42nd)
      • son to George Terrell, nephew to H.B. Terrell

  • Thurmond family

    • Pulaski A. Thurmond served in the House, 1863 (9th)

      • brother to George Thurmond and Alfred Thurmond
    • Alfred Thurmond served in the House, 1866–1870 (11th), and 1873–1874 (13th)
      • brother to George Thurmond and Pulaski Thurmond
    • George Murat Thurmond served in the House, 1901–1903 (27th)
      • brother to Alfred Thurmond and Pulaski Thurmond, father to Roger H. Thurmond, grandfather to George M. Thurmond and Roger H. Thurmond, Jr.
    • Roger Harold Thurmond served in the House, 1929 (41st)
      • son of George Thurmond, father to George M. Thurmond and Roger H. Thurmond, Jr., nephew to Alfred Thurmond and Pulaski Thurmond
    • George Murat Thurmond served in the House, 1955–1959 (54th–55th)
      • grandson of George M. Thurmond, great-nephew of Alfred Thurmond and Pulaski Thurmond
    • Roger H. Thurmond, Jr. served from 1959–1967 (56th–59th)
      • grandson of George M. Thurmond, great-nephew of Alfred Thurmond and Pulaski Thurmond

  • Truitt-Stephens family

    • James Alfred Truitt served in the Senate, 1846–1849 (1st–2nd), 1851–1853 (4th), 1855–1859 (6th–7th), and 1866–1870 (11th)

      • grandfather to James W. Truitt, John H. Truitt, and J.H. Stephens
    • Alfred M. Truit served in the Senate, 1849–1851 (3rd)
      • son of James Alfred Truitt, uncle^ to James W. Truitt and John H. Truitt
    • James W. Truitt served in the House, 1881–1883 (17th), and 1891–1895 (22nd–23rd)
      • brother to John H. Truitt, grandson to James Alfred Truitt, nephew^ to Alfred M. Truitt, cousin^ to J.H. Stephens
    • John Hays Truitt served in the House, 1887–1889 (20th)
      • brother to James W. Truitt, grandson to James Alfred Truitt, nephew^ to Alfred M. Truitt, cousin^ to J.H. Stephens
    • John Hall Stephens served in the House, 1889–1893 (21st–22nd)
      • grandson to James Alfred Truitt, cousin^ to James W. Truitt and John H. Truitt

  • Wurzbach-Kleberg-Eckhardt family

    • Charles Louis Wurzbach served in the House, 1876–1885 (15th–18th), and 1891–1892 (22nd)

      • father to William Wurzbach, grandfather to Bob Eckhardt
    • William Augustus Wurzbach served in the House, 1895–1897 (24th)
      • son to Charles Wurzbach, uncle to Bob Eckhardt
    • Marcellus Eugene Kleberg served in the House, 1873–1874 (13th)
      • brother to Rudolph Kleberg, uncle to Robert J. Eckhardt, great-uncle to Bob Eckhardt
    • Rudolph Kleberg served in the Senate, 1883–1886 (18th–19th)
      • brother to Marcellus Kleberg, uncle to Robert J. Eckhardt, great-uncle to Bob Eckhardt
    • Robert J. Eckhardt served in the Senate, 1915–1917 (34th)
      • uncle to Bob Eckhardt, nephew to Rudolph Kleberg, nephew to Marcellus Kleberg
    • Robert C. "Bob" Eckhardt served in the House, 1959–1967 (56th–59th)
      • grandson to Charles Wurzbach, nephew to William Wurzbach, nephew to Robert J. Eckhardt, great-nephew to Rudolph Kleberg, great-nephew to Marcellus Kleberg

*Many of the fathers and sons were "Senior" and "Junior," or at least shared the same first name. If we did not find indication of nicknames, we used "FirstName, Sr./Jr." on the second reference. In cases where we believe legislators had a preference for a nickname or abbreviated name, we used that name on the second reference. Names are in chronological order within family groups. We've attempted to identify all of the legislative extended families, but let us know if you think we missed some! This information is provided as a public service by the Legislative Reference Library. The Legislative Reference Library makes no representation as to its completeness or accuracy and makes no warranty in regard to its use. Users assume all risk of reliance on the information included on this site.

 
^ denotes where we are fairly certain of a familial connection but do not have sufficient documentation. Let us know if you can help confirm or deny our hunches!

Notable Names in the Minutes

Most of the people who testify at legislative hearings are "regular" people—active citizens or members of organizations who want to make their voices heard about proposed legislation. However, in our committee minutes scanning project, famous names sometimes jump out at us. Here are a few examples:

  • Musician Willie Nelson was the second individual to testify at the House Committee on Government Organization public hearing on April 4, 1989. Nelson spoke in favor of SB 489, 71R, a sunset bill that provided for the continuation of the Department of Agriculture. Noted in the minutes: "Chair recognized Willie Nelson of Austin, Texas, representing himself, as well as rabbits and horned toads." Congresswoman Barbara Jordan "of Austin, Texas, representing herself"—the Texas Legislature's own past Sen. Jordan—testified immediately following Nelson.
  • On March 11, 2009, the 81st Legislature's House Committee on Appropriations heard from Linda Gray and Larry Hagman, actors of Dallas fame, regarding film incentive funding.
  • Sometimes you have to know your Texas history—and possible name misspellings—to spot the notable figure mention. In the 39th Legislature (1925), the House Committee to Investigate Certain State Departments was charged with, among other items, investigating "the administration of highway affairs by the State Highway Commission." Former Rep. Sam Johnson, at the time a section foreman with the Highway Commission, testified before the committee, and he talks about his son, "Linden Johnson," who was driving tractors and helping Sam with payroll. "Lyndon" is the correct spelling of Rep. Johnson's son's name—as in future U.S. president Lyndon Baines Johnson! 

Legislative Families: Parents and Children

Leading by example is not just for parents teaching their children to have good manners and be good sports—some children are inspired by their parents' leadership and follow their footsteps into legislative careers. Between 1846 and 2019, more than 100 parent-children sets have served in the Texas Legislature.*

As with the legislative siblings, some parents/children's service overlapped:

  • Oscar Dudley Baker and Oscar Lindsey Baker ^

    • O.D. served in the House, 1921–1925 (37th–38th)
    • Oscar served in the House, 1923–1927 (38th–39th)
  • Spearman Holland and James K. Holland
    • Spearman served in the House, 1846–1847 (1st), 1857–1859 (7th), and 1861–1863 (9th), and in the Senate, 1863–1866 (10th)
    • James served in the House, 1849–1851 (3rd), and 1863 (9th), and in the Senate, 1853–1855 (5th)
  • Eddie Lucio, Jr. and Eddie Lucio III
    • Eddie, Jr. served in the House, 1987–1991 (70th–71st), and serves in the Senate, 1991–present (72nd–86th)
    • Eddie III serves in the House, 2007–present (80th–86th)
  • William Rowland Newton and George Mayo Newton In HCR 20, 46R, W.R.'s memorial resolution, he and George were recognized as "the only combination of a son and father team in each branch of the Legislature at the same time, from the same district, in the history of the Legislature."
    • W.R. served in the Senate, 1937–1938 (45th)
    • George served in the House, 1935–1939 (44th–45th)
  • George Butler Terrell and J. Turney Terrell
    • George served in the House, 1899–1903 (26th–27th), 1907–1913 (30th–32nd), 1917–1920 (35th–36th), and 1931–1933 (42nd)
    • J. Turney served in the House, 1930–1933 (41st–42nd)

Most parents and children served in different years:

*This blog post is the third in a series, with previous posts on legislative spouses and legislative siblings, and a post to come on other family connections. We've attempted to identify all of the legislative parents/children, but let us know if you think we missed some! This information is provided as a public service by the Legislative Reference Library. The Legislative Reference Library makes no representation as to its completeness or accuracy and makes no warranty in regard to its use. Users assume all risk of reliance on the information included on this site.

 

^Many of the fathers and sons were "Senior" and "Junior," or at least shared the same first name. If we did not find indication of nicknames, we used "FirstName, Sr./Jr." on the second reference. In cases where we believe legislators had a preference for a nickname or abbreviated name, we used that name on the second reference.

 

Capitol Spirits, 2019

Leading up to Halloween each year, we gather stories of supernatural and strange happenings in the Lone Star State. Below you'll find tales of hauntings by a madam, a governor, star-crossed lovers, outlaws, pirates, and soldiers. You can find these and more stories on our Capitol Spirits Pinterest board

From the Legislative Reference Library, we hope you have a fun and safe Halloween!!

Blanche DuMont

Austin's warehouse district serves up a front-row seat to lively entertainment, much as the area did in the late 1800s as the epicenter of Austin's red light district (Guy Town). Blanche DuMont, a well-known madam, owned a building at 211 W. 4th. Perhaps Blanche had so much fun, she didn't want to leave. She frequents the dance floor at Oilcan Harry's, the bar currently occupying her old address, and she's thought to be the presence down the street at her namesake bar, DuMont's Down Low.

 

Governor Pendleton Murrah

Governor Pendleton Murrah had a difficult life. Inaugurated in November 1863 in the midst of the Civil War, he faced this arduous situation while battling tuberculosis and handling the suicide of a young visitor to the Governor's Mansion. When the war ended, he fled to Mexico with Confederate troops, dying shortly after arrival. With so many trials and tribulations, perhaps his ghost, who is seen inside and outside the Governor's Mansion, is in search of a resolution to his misfortunes.

 

 

Waco's Cameron Park

Looking for a target-rich environment to do a little ghost hunting? You could not do better than Waco's Cameron Park. Look for the outlaws of Lindsey Hollow and the star-crossed lovers at the top of Lover's Leap. Partake of the haunting atmosphere of the Witch's Castle, Jacob's Ladder, and the Motorcycle Pits. Your roadmap is at "The Haunting of Cameron Park," by Terri Jo Ryan. 

 

John Wilkes Booth's Trip to Granbury

John St. Helen was well-known in Granbury in the 1870s as a bartender in town who occasionally acted in productions at the Granbury Opera House. Is his ghost the man seen in the lobby wearing a  white shirt, black pants, and tall boots, or the presence who folds down a seat in the balcony? And was John St. Helen really President Lincoln's assassin, John Wilkes Booth? Recent research indicates this might not be such a far-fetched idea. [Photo by Kairos14; CC BY-SA 3.0; Wikipedia Commons]    

 

Jean Lafitte's Treasure

Jean Laffite, the infamous pirate, plundered ships in the Gulf of Mexico and many think he left some of his treasure along the Texas coast. Did he bury $2 million in silver bars in the Sabine River? Native American legend speaks of his ghostly pirate band retrieving chests from a sunken vessel. Perhaps they did not get it all, but seek at your peril. Later treasure hunters report demons guard the stash.

 

The Confederate Soldier of Thompson's Island Bridge

What was it like for young Confederate soldiers to go off to war? Two young brothers growing up near San Marcos faced the unknown by promising each other they would return to their home when the fighting was finished—no matter what. One brother lived to return home, but the other died in the war. Perhaps the slain brother kept his promise to his sibling. Late at night you might see him on San Marcos' Thompson Island Bridge—waiting for his brother or reminding you of the evils and costs of war.

 

Cover image by Daniel Mingus

 

Legislative Families: Siblings

The Texas Legislature has seen many siblings who have legislative service in common. As of 2019, there have been 46 sibling sets!* Read on for a list of brothers and sisters who have shared time in the Capitol (along with some interesting details about a few of these family units).

 

Ten sets of siblings have had overlap in their years of service (though not necessarily in the same chamber): 

  • Dennis Bonnen and Greg Bonnen

    • Dennis serves in the House, 1997–present (75th–86th)
    • Greg serves in the House, 2013–present (83rd–86th)
  • William H. Bourland and James G. Bourland
    • William served in the House, 1846–1849 (1st–2nd), and 1853–1855 (5th)
    • James served in the Senate, 1846–1849 (1st–2nd)
  • James Washington Guinn and Robert Guinn
    • Robert served in the Senate, 1853–1870 (5th–11th)
    • James served in the House, 1863–1866 (10th–11th)
  • Ross Hardin and Doss Hardin The first and only twins to serve in the Texas Legislature. Read a speech given by Doss Hardin at Baylor University's 1939 "Convention of Twins" that was read into the Senate Journal record.
    • Ross served in the House, 1935–1941 (44th–46th)
    • Doss served in the Senate, 1938–1940 (45th–46th)
  • Jim Keffer and Bill Keffer
    • Jim served in the House, 1997–2017 (75th–84th)
    • Bill served in the House, 2003–2007 (78th–79th)
  • William Henry Pope and Alexander Pope In an act of brotherly devotion, Alexander died when shot by W.T.S. Keller "while endeavoring to prevent him from shooting his brother, W.H. Pope" during a child custody trial. William was shot but survived the assault.
    • William served in the Senate, 1883–1893 (18th–22nd)
    • Alexander served in the House, 1887–1889 (20th–21st)
  • Joseph Draper Sayers and William Sayers
    • Joseph served in the Senate, 1873–1874 (13th)
    • William served in the House, 1873–1876 (13th–14th)
  • Henry Berryman Terrell and George Butler Terrell The Terrells appear to be the first brothers to serve at the same time, in the same chamber.
    • H.B. served in the House, 1901–1909 (27th–30th), and in the Senate, 1909–1915 (31st–34th)
    • George served in the House, 1899–1903 (26th–27th), 1907–1913 (30th–32nd), 1917–1920 (35th–36th), and 1931–1933 (42nd)
  • Carlos Uresti and Tomas Uresti
    • Carlos served in the House, 1997–2006 (75th–79th), and in the Senate, 2006–2018 (79th–85th)
    • Tomas served in the House, 2017–2019 (85th)
  • Phillip L. Willis and Doyle Willis The Willis brothers are noted as the first siblings to serve two consecutive terms together in the Texas House of Representatives (HR 95, 74R).
    • Phillip served in in the House, 1947–1949 (50th–51st)
    • Doyle served in the House, 1947–1953 (50th–52nd), 1969–1971 (61st), and 1973–1997 (63rd–74th), and in the Senate, 1953–1963 (53rd–57th) 

No siblings have served at the same time in the Senate, according to our research.

 

Other siblings served in the Legislature at different times:

*This blog post is the second in a series, with a previous post on legislative spouses, and posts to come on legislative parents/children, and other family connections. We've attempted to identify all of the legislative siblings, but let us know if you think we missed some! This information is provided as a public service by the Legislative Reference Library. The Legislative Reference Library makes no representation as to its completeness or accuracy and makes no warranty in regard to its use. Users assume all risk of reliance on the information included on this site.

 

Happy Anniversary, LRL!

Happy anniversary to us! The Legislative Reference Library marks its 50th anniversary as an agency this September. The Legislative Reference Library was created as "an independent agency of the legislature" by Acts 1969, 61st Leg., p. 154, Ch. 55 (Senate Bill 263),

 

As noted last week, we are currently marking our anniversary year with a renovation project—but we will continue to offer reference, research, and other library services while we are relocated. We look forward to many more years of serving the legislative community! 

Texas African American History Memorial Exhibit

Entering the Capitol grounds from the south, one of the first monuments visitors see is the Texas African American History Memorial. Unveiled on November 19, 2016, the monument commemorates African American Texans and their contributions to the history and evolution of the Lone Star State. 

 

To see how the memorial developed in sculptor Ed Dwight's studio and learn about its legislative history, visit the Legislative Reference Library's display featuring the piece. Photographs showing components of the sculpture in different stages, alongside images of the final product, give insight into the artist's process. Placards lining the top of the case outline the eight bills that the legislature passed in the process of making the memorial a reality. (You can also learn more about the monument's legislative history here.)

 

As Texans prepare to commemorate Black History Month, we hope you'll visit our display and the Texas African American History Memorial to learn more about the wide array of contributions made by Black Texans.

 

Images, clockwise from top: 

The Texas African American History Memorial display is located in the case nearest the reference desk.

 

Photos from sculptor Ed Dwight's studio came to the library courtesy of Bill Jones, Esq., Chair of the Texas African American History Memorial Foundation, and help us to see the many steps and intricate work that went into the 27-foot high and 32-foot wide monument.

Succeeding Spouses

Over the years, the Texas Legislature has seen several spouses follow in their partner's legislative footsteps. On our Women Members of the Texas Legislature, 1923-present page, footnotes indicate the five instances in which a legislator succeeded her spouse in an unexpired term following his death, and the three wives who served as temporary acting representatives during their husbands' military deployments. (Footnotes also point out where women were elected but never sworn into a legislator's role.) 

  • Maribelle Stewart appears to be the first wife to complete her husband's term in the Texas Legislature following his death. W. Lacy Stewart (Senate, 50th Legislature) passed away on March 22, 1947. Maribelle won a special election to fill the vacancy, but she resigned her seat representing Senate District 16 in 1948 when she remarried.
  • Persis Henderson (House, 51st) succeeded her husband, A. Robin Henderson (House, 49th-51st) in representing House District 61 when he died on March 15, 1949. Persis won a special election to fill the seat (running as Mrs. A. Robin Henderson); she announced for reelection to a full term but withdrew her candidacy, citing low legislative pay and the high cost of living in Austin.
  • Sue Hairgrove (House, 60th) won a special election to succeed her husband, Jim Hairgrove (House, 60th) for the House District 20-F seat when he passed away on April 12, 1967.
  • Lou Nelle Sutton (House, 64th-70th) succeeded her husband, G.J. Sutton (House, 63rd-64th), following his death on June 22, 1976, and her special election win to represent House District 57-E on August 7, 1976. Lou Nelle went on to be reelected to the 65th-70th Legislatures.
  • Myra Crownover (House, 76th-84th), in a May 2000 special election, succeeded her husband, Ronny Crownover, (House, 76th) following his death on March 26, 2000. She continued to represent House District 64 for nearly two decades.
  • Valerie Corte (House, 79th, 81st), Cheri Isett (House, 79th), and Melissa Noriega (House, 79th) were selected by their husbands to serve as temporary acting representatives during military deployments. Frank Corte (House, 73rd-81st) was called to military service during his legislative service twice; Carl Isett (75th-81st) and Rick Noriega (House, 76th-80th) were each called once during their time in the House. 

In addition to spouses filling unexpired terms, there are several other cases where spouses succeeded their partners in the legislature, separated by a few years or by redistricting. (And in the first case, separated by divorce, too.)

  • Neveille Colson (House, 46th-50th Legislatures; Senate, 51st-59th Legislatures), the first woman to serve in both chambers of the legislature, was elected to represent House District 27 a couple years after her then-husband, Nall Colson (House, 43rd-44th), lost the seat. The couple divorced in 1938, before Neveille took office in 1939.
  • Betty Denton (House, 65th-73rd) represented McLennan County, House District 35-A, following her husband, Lane Denton (House, 62nd-64th), who resigned the House District 35-1 seat to run for the Texas Railroad Commission. Redistricting meant that while they represented the same county, the district was different.
  • Sam Harless (House, 86th) appears to be the first husband to fill a seat formerly occupied by a wife. He was elected in November 2018 to serve House District 126; Patricia Harless served the district from the 80th-84th Legislatures.
  • Angela Paxton (Senate, 86th-87th), elected in November 2018, serves Senate District 8, the same seat that her husband, current Attorney General Ken Paxton (House, 78th-82nd, Senate, 83rd), occupied.
  • Frances Rountree and Cora Strong were the first widows of legislators elected to serve in the Texas Legislature, both serving as representatives in the 42nd Legislature. Cora's husband, N.R. Strong, died while representing House District 55 during the 41st Legislature. Cora was elected to the seat for the following session. Frances' husband, Lee J. Rountree (House, 37th-38th), died at his desk in the House chamber in 1923. In 1930, running as "Mrs. Lee J. Rountree," Frances was elected to the House; however, redistricting in the intervening years changed the House District number for Brazos County from 22 to 26.

This blog post is the first in a series, with posts to come on legislative siblings, parents/children, and other family connections.

Capitol Spirits

Leading up to Halloween each year, we gather stories of supernatural and strange happenings in the Lone Star State. Below you'll find tales of epidemic, treasure, a curse, feuds, and more. You can find these and more stories on our Capitol Spirits Pinterest board

From the Legislative Reference Library, we hope you have a fun and safe Halloween!!

Shoal Creek

The environs of Shoal Creek have been the scene of many happy and hard times. Early settler Gideon White was killed along the creek by Indians in 1842. His daughter's husband, Edward Seiders, developed a popular recreation area there in the 1870s. General George Custer's troops camped by the creek during Reconstruction; some of the men died due to a cholera epidemic and were buried nearby. Perhaps their spirits still remain…

Shoal Creek Treasure

Tales of hidden treasure along Shoal Creek have captured the imagination of many Austinites, from O. Henry to a former county treasurer who was driven to suicide. A January 1897 article in the Austin Weekly Statesman stated, "It is a fever that is sapping the very foundation of our citizenship. It is making maniacs out of sensible men." Do ghostly figures still look for the gold on dark nights?

 

Abner Cook's bricks

Woodlawn Mansion was built in the 1850s by Abner H. Cook for James B. Shaw, Texas Comptroller. Shaw sold the house after the untimely deaths of his wife and young daughter. Along with other Cook buildings such as the Governor's Mansion and the Neill-Cochran House, the Woodlawn Mansion is associated with sad events or ghostly sightings. Could they carry the Shoal Creek curse through the energy imbued in their bricks that were created from clay and a kiln near the creek? [Photo credit: Austin History Center].

Columbus County Feud and Senator Marcus Harvey Townsend

Marcus Harvey Townsend served in the Texas Legislature representing Colorado County, first as a representative in the 18th Legislature and then as a senator in the 21st and 22nd Legislatures. He and his family gained notoriety with their violent feud with the Stafford family and then with their inter-family trouble known as the Colorado County Feud. These violent events occurred around the town of Columbus, Texas, which perhaps explains why it has been described as "profoundly haunted."  

Fort Colorado

In 1836 Robert M. Coleman established Fort Colorado in Eastern Travis County. His tenure as commander was short-lived, either due to a dispute with Sam Houston or the death of a Ranger under his command. However, legend offers another story: Coleman was meeting secretly with a Comanche medicine man to bring about peace when the medicine man was shot by a soldier. Coleman was relieved of duty and drowned within a year. Are the ghostly figures seen on foggy nights Coleman and the medicine man, still discussing peace?

Bertram Store / Clay Pit

Rudolph Bertram ran a thriving wholesale grocery, saloon, and general store on Guadalupe Street in the 1880s. Business was conducted downstairs, with living quarters up above. The space now houses the popular Clay Pit Restaurant, but diners may share the space with previous inhabitants. Is the apparition of a small child Bertram's young son who died of typhoid fever? And are the upstairs party noises an echo of wild times at the brothel that was joined to the saloon through a basement tunnel?

 

Cover image by Daniel Mingus

Exploring the Texas Album of the Eighth Legislature

Locating photos of Texas legislators from the pre-Civil War period is no easy task. The composites that currently decorate the Capitol's ground floor halls were not yet a tradition, and photography was a relatively new technology.

 

That rarity means the Legislative Reference Library was especially pleased to learn about The Texas Album of the Eighth Legislature. The album is an early attempt to document all of the state's officials, created by a traveling photographer, William DeRyee and his business partner, R.E. Moore. DeRyee took individual albumen portraits of the Eighth Legislature (1860), along with Governors Hardin R. Runnels and Sam Houston, Lieutenant Governor Edward Clark, and Speaker Marion DeKalb Taylor. A short biography and the counties the member represented accompany many of the portraits. Most of the biographies are the usual recitations of the member's family and work, but Rep. George McKnight's stands out—his bio page includes an original poem, "The Wanderer," musing on the loss of his parents and siblings.

 

Original copies of the album are held by the Texas State Library and Archives Commission (TSLAC), the Bancroft Library at University of California-Berkeley, and the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History. Looking at the different copies, you can see evidence of their prior owners' use. In the TSLAC edition, someone scribbled over the faces of some of the officials. They also wrote little notes in the margins, like—on Sam Houston's photo page—"Old Uncle Sam father of Texas — Sam 72 years old."

 

Many of the photos in the Bancroft copy have faded, and someone attempted to recreate some of the disappearing eyes, mouths, and other features—not to good effect. (Trying to pencil in eyes and noses on a photo never works well.) In some instances where the photo was missing all together, a previous owner attempted penciled-in portraits. Let us say that these portraits are more cartoonish than realistic. See page 237's cartoon of Rep. L.B. Camp—who has a perfectly respectable portrait in TSLAC's copy—as one example, and scroll to the end of our digital album to check out more caricatures/doodles. (Some of the drawings at the end of the album appear to be women; however, there were no biographies to go with them.) The photos and the bios in Bancroft's album are also jumbled up: Sam Houston's photo is almost 350 pages after his biography.

 

In an effort to pull the best of the originals together, the LRL has compiled a digital album and integrated photos and information from it into our Texas Legislators: Past & Present database, where you can view information about legislators in Texas from 1846 through the present.

 
Interesting historical side note: Following the 1860 publication of The Texas Album of the Eighth Legislature, photographer William DeRyee continued his photography business a little longer, but the Confederacy saw another use for his chemistry background. He was appointed state chemist and put in charge of the Texas Percussion Cap Manufactory. He also worked with the Confederate Nitre and Mining Bureau. He made various innovations and developments in explosives, but the Confederacy lacked well-trained chemists to assist him with his work. Following the Civil War, he opened a drugstore in Corpus Christi and developed a treatment of chlorine water with creosote as an antiseptic that helped alleviate a yellow fever epidemic. His son, Charles DeRyee, is credited with first documenting the presence of the boll weevil in Texas.

More Entries