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Current Articles & Research Resources, February 21

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Track how canceled hearings during the partial federal government shutdown affected the workload of immigration courts. (Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse, Syracuse University, February 19, 2019)
  • Consider ways to address internet privacy and consumer protection related to internet privacy concerns. (U.S. Government Accountability Office, January 2019)
  • See state-by-state legislation intended to streamline the deploy of 5G mobile technology. (National Conference of State Legislatures, February 15, 2019)
  • Read about programs in some states that incorporate professional foster parents into their foster care systems to provide care to special needs children. (Stateline, February 20, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "Texas Enterprise Fund under the microscope." By Daniel Salazar. Austin Business Journal, February 8, 2019, p. 12.
    Highlights recent study that raises transparency concerns regarding the Texas Enterprise Fund, the state's economic development incentive program.
  • "How states use funds under the TANF block grant." By Liz Schott, Ife Floyd, and Ashley Burnside. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Updated February 19, 2019, pp. 1-20.
    Finds states spent only about half of their Temporary Assistance to Needy Families [TANF] funds in fiscal year 2017 on the core welfare reform areas of basic assistance, child care for low-income families, and work supports. Includes several state tables on TANF spending and includes Texas in a discussion of black families' experience with basic assistance.
  • "The labour market: True colours." Economist, February 16th-22nd, 2019, pp. 62-63.
    Explains how occupational segregation affects earnings and the gender pay gap.
  • "The safety-net: The Arkansas experiment." Economist, February 16th-22nd, 2019, pp. 23-24.
    Examines the preliminary results of Arkansas' experiment imposing extensive work requirements on Medicaid recipients. Notes 18,000 people lost their health insurance, due in part to widespread confusion over program requirements and lack of Internet access to submit reports that could only be filed online.
  • "Are states poised to tackle outdated K-12 funding formulas?" By Daarel Burnette II. Education Week, February 13, 2019, pp. 22-23.
    Argues the political climate is right for states to revamp their outdated and inefficient school funding formulas. Highlights the plans of eight states, including Texas, for improving their school funding systems.
  • "Teachers missing out on flood of K-12 cash." By Daarel Burnette II. Education Week, January 23, 2019, pp. 1, 17.
    Addresses states' efforts to fund teacher pay increases and the challenges encountered. Reports funding is often siphoned away to competing priorities at the district level. Highlights recent teacher salary legislation in Texas.
  • "The best cyber offense is a good cyber defense." By Jackie Benton. Fiscal Notes, February 2019, p. 1.
    Examines training of cybersecurity specialists. Notes eighteen colleges and universities in Texas, including The University of Texas at El Paso, The University of Texas at Dallas, and Texas A&M University - San Antonio, have partnered with the National Security Agency to be national centers for cyber defense education.
  • "Texas' public pensions: Growing liabilities could affect state finances." By Spencer Grubbs and Amanda Williams. Fiscal Notes, February 2019, pp. 1, 3-7.
    Examines how government pension plans work in general and compares defined benefit [DB], defined contribution [DC], and hybrid plans, with survey of hybrid retirement plans in other states. Discusses the financial health and funded ratios of the seven statewide public pension systems in Texas, specifically the Teacher Retirement System and Employees Retirement System.
  • "Opportunity Zones: A different zone opportunity." By Diane Lupke. Journal of MultiState Taxation and Incentives, February 2019, pp. 22-23, 44.
    Compares the new federal Opportunity Zones program, established in the 2017 Tax Cuts and Job Act, with previous zone-style programs and investment vehicles. Looks at early investor activity in Opportunity Zones in Louisville, Kentucky, and the state of Indiana.
  • "Pay attention to this little-noticed opioid lawsuit in Oklahoma." By Christine Vestal. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), February 14, 2019, pp. 1-9.
    Highlights Oklahoma lawsuit alleging drug companies misrepresented the benefits and addictive qualities of opioid drugs. Suggests the Oklahoma case, scheduled for trial in May 2019, could precipitate a settlement in the consolidated national lawsuit set for trial in October.
  • "Not all that is lawful is beneficial: The unintended consequences of ignoring legislative intent." By Jack Walker and Reid Martin. Texas Lawyer, March 2019, pp. 20, 22, 24.
    Points out the lack of clarity in the statutory construction of Texas Civil Practice and Remedies Code § 74.153, standards of proof in cases involving emergency medical care, part of the Texas Medical Liability Act. Related information at: http://www.txcourts.gov/media/1443046/170256.pdf.
  • "All together now." By Sean Price. Texas Medicine, February 2019, pp. 22-27.
    Considers how major healthcare mergers, like that proposed by Baylor Scott & White Health and Memorial Hermann, reshape how Texas physicians practice. Asserts that Texas has some of the nation's strictest laws against the corporate practice of medicine, but that the enforcement of these laws has been eroding.
  • "Physician-lawmakers outline priorities for 2019 legislature." By David Doolittle. Texas Medicine, February 2019, pp. 12-13.
    Summarizes topics addressed by Reps. John Zerwas and Tom Oliverson at the Texas Medical Association's Advocacy Retreat, such as better access to mental health care in schools, reducing maternal deaths, and surprise billing.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, February 14

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "Film incentives: Creatives worry rebates could keep shrinking." By Kimberly Reeves. Austin Business Journal, February 8, 2019, p. 6.
    Reviews the history of the Texas Moving Image Industry Incentive program [TMIIIP], noting funds appropriated since 2010. Mentions concerns over HB432, 86th Legislature, which proposes to abolish TMIIIP and the Music, Film, Television, and Multimedia Office in the office of the governor.
  • "Rural hospital closures worry key lawmaker." By Kimberly Reeves. Austin Business Journal, February 1, 2019, p. 6.
    Discusses concerns over access to health care in rural areas. Includes comments by Senator Lois Kolkhorst, chairwoman of the Texas Senate Health and Human Services Committee.
  • "Child support cooperation requirements in SNAP are unproven, costly, and put families at risk." By Elizabeth Wolkomir and Stacy Dean. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, February 7, 2019, pp. 1-15.
    Reviews potential new cooperation requirements between child support and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program [SNAP, formerly food stamps] included in the new farm bill. Notes Texas research showing that more than four in ten mothers who do not receive formal or informal child support are survivors of emotional or physical abuse.
  • "Once a nation of joiners, Americans are now suspicious of those who join." By Henry Gass. Christian Science Monitor, February 4, 2019, pp. 14-15.
    Highlights two recent situations that show misunderstandings and fear of religious associations — objections to Dr. Shahid Shafi serving as vice chair of the Tarrant County Republican Party and questions about whether Brian Buescher, a United States District Court nominee, could separate his views as a member of the Knights of Columbus from his decision-making on the bench.
  • "Texas town pioneers ways to fight decline of rural high schools." By Henry Gass. Christian Science Monitor, February 4, 2019, p. 13.
    Highlights the early college and STEM programs that Roscoe Independent School District has incorporated into its educational offerings to keep the small rural school district viable and to give their students opportunities beyond graduation.
  • "Banishing blasphemy." By Rob Boston. Church & State, February 2019, pp. 10-13.
    Examines the history of blasphemy laws in America and Europe, noting many countries have repealed or are trying to repeal these laws. Points out attempts by several American states to revive blasphemy laws.
  • "Global trade: Gaming the rules." Economist, February 2nd-8th, 2019, pp. 60-61.
    Reports on the World Trade Organization's plans to negotiate new rules covering trade-related aspects of electronic commerce. Notes conflicts in how different countries define and govern e-commerce.
  • "Opioid prescribing rates in nonmetropolitan and metropolitan counties among primary care providers using an electronic health record system — United States, 2014–2017." By Macarena C. Garcia, et alInternet Resource, January 18, 2019, pp. 1-6.
    Reports that the percentage of patients prescribed an opioid was higher in rural than in urban areas in a 2014-2017 reporting period. Recommends tailoring community health care practices and intervention programs to community characteristics.
  • "Will state waivers save, reform, or sabotage Obamacare?" By Stuart M. Butler. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), February 5, 2019, pp. 441-442.
    Considers the possible effects of new guidance from the Trump administration to states on how they can use Section 1332 of the Affordable Care Act [ACA] to develop waivers. Asserts that Section 1332 allows states to make significant modifications to the ACA without new laws altering the act.
  • "In the eye of the law." By Louis Menand. New Yorker, February 4, 2019, pp. 18-22.
    Explores the history of racial discrimination and interpretation of the Fourteenth Amendment through an examination of the United States Supreme Court opinion, Plessy v. Ferguson. Compares Steve Luxenberg's book, Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation with other books highlighting this case.
  • "Reliability means business." By Alex Hofmann. Public Power, January/February 2019, p. 39.
    Lists metrics a public power utility should be able to articulate regarding the reliability of their system. Includes Austin Energy as an example.
  • "TPPA [Texas Public Power Association] members collaborate with PUC [Public Utilities Commission] on summer planning." Texas Public Power, January 2019, pp. 4-5.
    Reports on the current work of the Texas Public Power Association in anticipation of electric energy demand for the upcoming summer.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, February 7

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Examine school district funding in Texas. (Urban Institute, January 2019)
  • Consider findings that indicate the presence of heavy metals in popular fruit juices. (Consumer Reports, January 30, 2019)
  • Explore the Governor's proposed budget for the 2020-2021 biennium. (Office of the Texas Governor, February 2019)
  • See a list of state agencies that are under Sunset review for the 86th legislative session. (Texas Sunset Advisory Commission, accessed February 6, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "Trafficking survivors shed an unjust label: 'Criminal'." By Stacy Teicher Khadaroo. Christian Science Monitor, January 28, 2019, p. 10.
    Focuses on the changes taking place in criminal laws, such as prostitution charges and other trafficking- related crimes, so that the trafficking victim is not further harmed and punished.
  • "Why Central Americans trek north, despite crackdown at US border." By Whitney Eulich. Christian Science Monitor, January 28, 2019, pp. 32-33.
    Explains that migrants seeking asylum in the United States start the journey without correct information on their chances of being successful. Reports that most Central Americans would prefer to stay in their own country, have tried to relocate within their country, and cross borders only as a last resort.
  • "The Methuselah annuity." By Steven Malanga. City Journal (Manhattan Institute), February 4, 2019, pp. 1-3.
    Explains public employees' life expectancy and mortality rates are placing additional pressure on communities already struggling to meet pension obligations.
  • "New Texas Legislature means new casino bills." By Kimberly Reeves. Dallas Business Journal, January 25, 2019, p. 2.
    Reports on the history of gambling and casino bills introduced in past sessions and the likelihood of a gambling-related bill passing in the 86th legislative session. Mentions bills introduced by Representatives Harold Dutton and Joe Deshotel.
  • "Combating drones: A new dogfight." Economist, January 26th-February 1st, 2019, pp. 69-70.
    Addresses the dangers posed by close drone encounters and rogue drones used for criminal purposes. Evaluates the state of anti-drone technology.
  • "It's time to modernize the Endangered Species Act." By Bryson Wong. Public Power, January/February 2019, p. 37.
    Provides information about recent efforts in Congress to update the Endangered Species Act. See proposed rules at: https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-2018-07-25/pdf/2018-15810.pdfhttps://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-2018-07-25/pdf/2018-15811.pdf, and https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-2018-07-25/pdf/2018-15812.pdf.
  • "Locally powered, locally staffed: Workforce for economic development." By Jessica Portner. Public Power, January/February 2019, pp. 30-36.
    Highlights public power utilities, including Austin Energy, that are engaging with their communities through training and education programs.
  • "The lingering stench of marijuana prohibition." By Jacob Sullum. Reason, March 2019, pp. 32-43.
    Discusses the lingering effect of marijuana convictions, even in states that have since legalized the marijuana for recreational use. Considers the expungement or sealing of these criminal records and highlights the variety of remedies offered by the states where the drug is now legal.
  • "The Census: Get ready to enumerate." By Patrick Potyondy. State Legislatures, January/February 2019, pp. 28-31.
    Points out key groups of people who have historically been undercounted in the Census. Notes even a one percent undercount can cost a state a seat in the United States House of Representatives and millions of dollars in federal funding.
  • "Municipal courts." By Sherry Statman. Texas Bar Journal, February 2019, pp. 104-105.
    Provides a primer on municipal courts and relates concerns regarding protections for indigent defendants. 
  • "Value judgement: Property tax ruling ushers in problems, opportunities." By Charles E. Gilliland. Tierra Grande, January 2019, pp. 26-28.
    Discusses implications of EXLP Leasing Inc. v. Galveston Central Appraisal, a 2018 Texas Supreme Court decision on property taxes. Speculates the ruling could lead to legislative measures that would undermine the integrity of the property tax base but also resolve long-standing issues relating to transportation and utility properties.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, January 31

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Explore the economic outlook for the United States. (Congressional Budget Office, January 2019)
  • Examine characteristics of federal executive agencies. (Administrative Conference of the United States, December 20, 2018)
  • Find details on equalized funding elements of the Foundation School Program. (Legislative Budget Board, January 2019)
  • Consider state laws related to online privacy. (National Conference of State Legislatures, January 7, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "Pell grants for prisoners would yield 'cascade' of benefits, advocates say." By Emma Pettit. Chronicle of Higher Education, January 25, 2019, p. A28.
    Discusses the 1994 ban of prisoners receiving Pell Grants and efforts since to reestablish this path to higher education for the prison population. Highlights findings of a recent report on the topic: Investing in Futures: Economic and Fiscal Benefits of Postsecondary Education in Prison.
  • "Early education: Young Americans." Economist, January 26th-February 1st, 2019, pp. 23-24.
    Reports more politicians from both parties are recognizing the importance of quality early education programs. Praises San Antonio's program, Pre-K 4 SA, of full-day preschool for four-year-olds.
  • "Texas school finance: Doing the math on the state's biggest expenditure." Fiscal Notes, January 2019, pp. 1-24.
    Presents a special edition on the history and intricacies of Texas' school finance system, including formulas, school finance litigation, the Foundation School Program, school funding sources, and school finance cost drivers and state/local shares.
  • "Rule would let companies deny many workers in Texas employment benefits." By Ed Sills and AFL-CIO. Internet Resource, January 10, 2019, p. 1.
    Argues that a proposed regulation by the Texas Workforce Commission exceeds their rule-making authority by changing the definition of "employee," allowing them to be called "marketplace contractors" in a digital network business. Suggests this re-definition should be considered by the legislature.
  • "College affordability update: Value, price, and choice in U.S. higher education." By Beth Akers, Kim Dancy, and Jason Delisle. Issue Brief (Manhattan Institute), January 8, 2019, pp. 1-8.
    Updates an earlier analysis of college affordability using the most recent data from the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study.
  • "Making way (hopefully) for 5G." By Thomas M. Lenard and Lawrence J. White. Milken Institute Review, First Quarter 2019, pp. 28-35.
    Explores regulatory issues with the next generation of wireless technologies, collectively known as "5G" infrastructure, and the need for federal agencies to expand the "spectrum" dedicated to wireless communications.
  • "How state-level Child Care Development Fund policies may shape access and utilization among Hispanic families." By Lisa A. Gennetian, Julia Mendez, and Zoelene Hill. National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families, January 2019, pp. 1-9.
    Discusses the Child Care and Development Fund [CCDF], a federal-state child care financial assistance partnership. Details how 13 states, including Texas, implement eligibility requirements, household and work documentation requirements, prioritization of TANF recipients, and availability of program information online in Spanish.
  • "Mr. 2012." National Review, January 28, 2019, pp. 16-18.
    Considers the presidential candidacy of Julián Castro, stating he may be one of the youngest and the only Latino in a crowded Democratic field. Comments that initially he has not inspired broad support and his experience may not be suited to this election.
  • "Marijuana reform on the way?" By Kimberly Reeves. San Antonio Business Journal, January 18, 2019, p. 18.
    Presents the efforts in Texas to decriminalize marijuana use under certain circumstances. Points out the tax savings and tax revenues in other states that have legalized medical and recreational marijuana use.
  • "Top ten issues to watch in 2019." By Julie Lays. State Legislatures, January/February 2019, pp. 10-15.
    Summarizes the top ten pressing issues that will dominate state legislative agendas in 2019. Provides lists of runner-up issues of concern as well as state issues with a federal component.
  • "¿Mi casa es su casa? Restrictive covenants and short-term rentals." By Rusty Adams. Tierra Grande, January 2019, pp. 24-25.
    Reports on the 2018 Texas Supreme Court ruling in Tarr v. Timberwood Park Owners Association Inc., a case that addresses restrictive covenants and short term-term rentals. Includes discussion on what the court did not say.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, January 24

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • See where the United States ranks among other countries in economic freedom. (The Heritage Foundation, ©2018)
  • Examine teacher pension plans in six states, including Texas. (National Institute on Retirement Security, January 8, 2019)
  • Consider how apprenticeship programs are a path to employment. (The Council of State Governments, January 23, 2019)
  • Explore the Texas Attorney General's new educational website related to opioid misuse and abuse. (Attorney General of Texas, January 22, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "OZ: Opportunity zones." By Paul Thompson. Austin Business Journal, January 18, 2019, pp. 4-7.
    Provides a guide to opportunity zones, a new community investment tool created under the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act to encourage long-term investments in distressed communities throughout the country.
  • "Many SNAP households will experience long gap between monthly benefits even if shutdown ends." By Dorothy Rosenbaum. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, January 22, 2019, pp. 1-8.
    Reports on the lengthy delay between the issuance of February and March benefits for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program [SNAP]. Includes a table of selected states, including Texas, showing SNAP households facing a 50-day or longer gap in benefits.
  • "Refashioning Title IX: Here's what people are saying at regulations.gov." By Steven Johnson. Chronicle of Higher Education, January 11, 2019, p. A20.
    Highlights the huge number of public comments being submitted on the proposed revision of Title IX, gender equity, and sexual assault investigation regulations for higher education institutions. Explains the new regulations will be open for public comment through January 28, 2019. Related information at: https://www.regulations.gov/document?D=ED-2018-OCR-0064-0001.
  • "Health economics: Shopping for a Caesarean." Economist, January 12th-18th, 2019, pp. 22-23.
    Reports the new price-transparency rule requiring hospitals to post standard charges for their services online is unlikely to reduce prices, but could instead trigger a price war that results in higher prices.
  • "Moving toward more equitable state tax systems: A "who pays?" follow-up report on tax policy options for advancing equity and addressing income inequality." By Dylan Grundman. Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, January 2019, pp. 1-9.
    Presents state tax policy recommendations to improve economic opportunities and address racial inequities. Discusses best practices in corporate income taxes and overuse of sales taxes as a significant source of state and local revenue. Report at: https://itep.org/whopays/.
  • "How states use Medicaid managed care to deliver long-term services and supports to children with special health care needs." By Kate Honsberger, et al. Internet Resource, November 2018, pp. 1-24.
    Provides a 50-state review and analysis of state Medicaid managed care programs that provide long-term services and supports [LTSS] to children and youth with special health care needs. Notes that Texas is one of three states that have designed stand-alone MLTSS programs to specifically serve Medicaid populations with complex health care needs.
  • "Physicians are steering the conversation about gun violence." By Rita Rubin. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), January 15, 2019, pp. 133-135.
    Interviews Dr. Megan Ranney, one of the leading voices in the "This Is Our Lane" movement, on why firearm violence is a public health issue and how physicians can play an important role in advocating for policy solutions.
  • "Cost-of-living adjustments (2018)." National Association of State Retirement Administrators, December 2018, pp. 1-16.
    Discusses periodic cost-of-living adjustments [COLA] in state and local government pensions, common COLA types and features, COLA costs, and recent changes. Features an appendix of COLA provisions by state, including Texas County & District Retirement System, Employees Retirement System of Texas, Texas Municipal Retirement System, and Teacher Retirement System of Texas.
  • "Deregulation meets markets: Econ 101 shows the way." By Charles Bayless. Public Utilities Fortnightly, January 2019, pp. 46-51.
    Explores problems that arise when regulated prices interact with incorrect pricing signals in the free market. Provides examples of incorrect pricing and its effects.
  • "Is CBD a miracle cure or a marketing scam? (Both)." By Mike Riggs. Reason, February 2019, pp. 26-34.
    Examines the use of CBD [cannabidiol], a compound derived from marijuana and hemp plants. Explains the importance of separating use as a life-changing medicine for the chronically ill from the newly popular luxury self-care products. Suggests federal regulatory barriers need to be changed to allow for proper regulation of products and research into medical uses.
  • "Texas top-ranked state for firm relocations." By Anil Kumar and Alexander T. Abraham. Southwest Economy (Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas), Fourth Quarter 2018, pp. 3-8.
    Analyzes trends in recent corporate relocations to Texas, the net migration rate of employment, and the role of tax incentives.
  • "Rural hospitals in greater jeopardy in non-Medicaid expansion states." By Michael Ollove. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), January 22, 2019, pp. 1-6.
    Examines whether Medicaid eligibility expansion could save rural hospitals that are at risk of closing in Texas and other non-expansion states.
  • "Leveraging LARCs." By Sean Price. Texas Medicine, January 2019, pp. 26-29.
    Argues for LARCs [long-acting reversible contraceptives] to play an increasing role in Texas' solution for reducing maternal mortality. Explains the need for legislation to make LARCs more easily accessible and for continuing medical education to enhance both patient and physician awareness of LARCs.
  • "The survivor." By Aryn Baker. Time, January 28, 2019, pp. 36-43.
    Examines sex trafficking in the United States, focusing on oil and shale drilling communities in North Dakota and Texas. Profiles a survivor of sex trafficking, who now helps other trafficked victims and provides sex-trafficking awareness training for law enforcement, including officers in Odessa, Texas.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, January 17

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Explore NCSL's updated State Tax Actions database. (National Conference of State Legislatures, December 17, 2018)
  • Examine an in-depth look at the relationship between resources and population. (Cato Institute, December 4, 2018)
  • Read about how excessive social media use is similar to drug addiction. (Michigan State University, January 10, 2019)
  • Consider the cybersecurity risks created by the partial federal government shutdown. (Wired, January 16, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "History lessons." By Glenn Cook. American School Board Journal, February 2019, pp. 22-26.
    Discusses the challenges of teaching history in public schools. Addresses the problems with the current teaching model and the difficulty of teaching the complex topics of slavery and immigration.
  • "What businesses want from Texas lawmakers this year." By Kimberly Reeves. Austin Business Journal, January 11, 2019, p. 12.
    Discusses the business community's top priorities for the 86th Legislature: preserving economic development incentives and tax abatements.
  • "Officials deploy new tools, overcome obstacles to protect elections." By Sean Slone. Capitol Ideas, November/December 2018, pp. 36-39.
    Reviews various election security initiatives in the states in response to the cyberattacks of the 2016 election, including interagency partnerships, technology improvements, and new communications protocols. Reports on the new Council of State Governments Election Cybersecurity Initiative Guide for state and local officials, released in December 2018. Report at: http://csg.org/cyber/.
  • "Child welfare agency spending in Texas." Child Trends, December 20, 2018, pp. 1-8.
    Summarizes FY 2016 expenditures of child welfare agencies in Texas, including federal (Title IV-E, Title IV-B, Medicaid, TANF), state, and local expenditures. Details Texas' use of funds on preventive services and adoption and guardianship costs. Report at: https://www.childtrends.org/research/research-by-topic/child-welfare-financing-survey-sfy-2016.
  • "Saving Arizona." By Rob Boston. Church & State, January 2019, pp. 6-8.
    Explains how six women used the citizens' referendum process to defeat legislation expanding Arizona's voucher plan (Proposition 305). Related information at: https://ballotpedia.org/Arizona_Proposition_305,_
    Expansion_of_Empowerment_Scholarship_Accounts_Referendum_(2018)
    .
  • "Funding public education (and other legislative priorities)." Classroom Teacher (Texas Classroom Teachers Association), Winter 2018-19, pp. 10-13.
    Highlights education issues that are a priority for the 86th Legislature. Addresses school finance, teacher salaries, pensions, school safety, and more.
  • "Are we at a tipping point?" By Lorraine Glennon. Consumer Reports, February 2019, pp. 35-41.
    Examines the inequities and fraud associated with the gratuity economy and potential remedies. Includes a brief history of tipping.
  • "Education: Grad inflation." Economist, January 5th-11th, 2019, pp. 18-19.
    Considers the role of online credit recovery courses in high school graduation-rate inflation.
  • "The battle over NAFTA has just begun." By Lori Wallach. Nation, January 14/21, 2019, pp. 16-19.
    Discusses challenges of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, signed November 30, 2018. Criticizes the lack of consumer protection and labor standards, as well as the addition of monopoly rights for the pharmaceutical industry.
  • "Unwatched pot." By Malcolm Gladwell. New Yorker, January 14, 2019, pp. 18-21.
    Considers whether enough is known about marijuana to make good public health policy decisions. Contrasts the study of marijuana with the more exhaustive study of nicotine.
  • "Texas pre-K enrollment exceeds U.S. rate." By Stephanie Gullo. Southwest Economy (Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas), Fourth Quarter 2018, p. 9.
    Discusses the status of pre-kindergarten funding in Texas and finds that 49.4 percent of Texas four-year-olds were enrolled in state-funded pre-kindergarten programs in 2016-17, compared with 32.7 percent nationally.
  • "Medicaid 'buy-in' could be a new health care option for the uninsured." By Michael Ollove. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), January 10, 2019, pp. 1-6.
    Examines the viability of state Medicaid buy-in programs and likely political challenges from the insurance industry and the federal government.
  • "Eminent domain a priority issue for Texas Farm Bureau." Texas Agriculture, January 4, 2018, p. 2.
    Provides excerpts from the Texas Farm Bureau president's address to the organization's annual meeting, highlighting eminent domain reform as the most important issue in Texas agriculture.
  • "New allies at the Capitol." By Joey Berlin. Texas Medicine, January 2019, pp. 30-31, 33
  • Profiles Representatives Steve Allison, Cody Harris, Julie Johnson, and John Turner, as examples of freshman pro-medicine legislators.
  • "On call at the Capitol." By Joey Berlin and Sean Price. Texas Medicine, January 2019, pp. 20-25.
    Outlines the Texas Medical Association's primary goals for the 86th Legislature, such as improving Medicaid coverage, addressing insurance issues such as prior authorization and network adequacy, and public health objectives.
  • "The power of the Permian." By Justin Worland. Time, January 14, 2019, pp. 22-27.
    Examines how the oil and gas industry in the Permian Basin is affecting the economy, the international energy industry, the environment, and Texas.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, January 10

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Review how to read bills and statutes. (Texas Legislative Council, accessed January 9, 2019)
  • Explore trends in crime in the U.S. (Pew Research Center, January 3, 2019)
  • Read about the status of the special counsel investigation into Russian interference with the 2016 elections. (Congressional Research Service, January 2, 2019)
  • View recent state legislation related to financial crimes against the elderly. (National Conference of State Legislatures, January 3, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "Breakdown." By Julianne Hill. ABA Journal: The Lawyer's Magazine, January-February 2019, pp. 37-43. Reports on how states are using prisons and jails to house mentally ill persons who have not been convicted of crimes, due to the lack of psychiatric hospital beds and community-based mental health services.
  • "Student crossing." By Story Hinckley. Christian Science Monitor, November 26, 2018, pp. 24-30.
    Profiles the Luna County, New Mexico, school system's inclusion of students who live in a nearby Mexican town. Quotes the Deming, New Mexico, mayor on the value of the cross-border education program in educating future citizens and leaders. Explains the value of building the potential local tax base in a small rural town and reducing future welfare expenditures.
  • "'I'm solution-agnostic'." Chronicle of Higher Education, December 14, 2018, p. A6-A7.
    Interviews Katharine Hayhoe, a climate scientist from Texas Tech University and one of the authors of the recent National Climate Assessment, on climate change and her role in the discussions surrounding this topic. Report at: https://nca2018.globalchange.gov/chapter/front-matter-about/.
  • "The people have spoken: Private school vouchers have a long track record of failure at the ballot box." By Rob Boston. Church & State, January 2019, pp. 9-11.
    Provides an overview of high-profile state legislative proposals since 1967 that sought to establish voucher plans or other types of public aid to private and religious schools but were defeated at the ballot box.
  • "1,800 companies left California in a year — with a lot bound for Texas." By Bill Hethcock. Dallas Business Journal, December 21, 2018, pp. 14-15.
    Points out the top reasons California companies are relocating to states with a better business climate. Notes the top ten states and cities that gained the most from California business relocations and migrations.
  • "Municipal limits: Less than the sum of their parts." Economist, December 22nd, 2018-January 4th, 2019, pp. 41-42.
    Considers the negative effects of municipal fragmentation, using the current structure in Birmingham, Alabama, as an example. Offers examples of approaches cities and metro areas can take to build and maintain regional cooperation, promote unity, and deliver better services to all residents. Related information at: http://togetherweprosper.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/PARCA-Cooperation-in-Greater-Bham_FINAL170609.pdf.
  • "How is telemedicine being used in opioid and other substance use disorder treatment?" By Haiden A. Huskamp, et al. Health Affairs, December 2018, pp. 1940-1947.
    Argues that tele-SUD [telemedicine for substance use disorder] is being under-utilized and could increase access to SUD treatment, particularly in rural areas. Notes regulatory and reimbursement barriers and that Congress and the states are passing legislation to address them.
  • "Telehealth in health centers: Key adoption factors, barriers, and opportunities." By Ching-Ching Claire Lin, et al. Health Affairs, December 2018, pp. 1967-1974.
    Examines factors associated with adoption of telehealth services by health centers and barriers to use, such as cost, reimbursement, and technical issues. Notes that Medicaid reimbursement policies promoting live video and store-and-forward services were associated with a greater likelihood of telehealth adoption and potentially improved access to care.
  • "States move to substitute opioids with medical marijuana to quell epidemic." By Rebecca Voelker. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), December 18, 2018, pp. 2408-2410.
    Considers the pros and cons of states adopting laws and regulations allowing certain patients with opioid prescriptions instead to buy cannabis at a registered dispensary with a physician's written certification.
  • "EPA finalizes amendments to refinery emissions control requirements." Oil and Gas Journal, December 3, 2018, pp. 37-38.
    Clarifies the Environmental Protection Agency's final rule, amending the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants and New Source Performance Standards for refineries, which recently went into effect. Related information at: https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/11/26/2018-25080/national-emission-standards-for-hazardous-air-pollutants-and-new-source-performance-standards.
  • "FCC's decision accelerating broadband deployment: They struck a decent balance." By Steve Goodman. Public Utilities Fortnightly, December 2018, pp. 52-53.
    Examines the role of local and state governments in light of the Federal Communications Commission's recent decision regarding broadband deployment. Related information at: https://www.fcc.gov/document/fcc-facilitates-wireless-infrastructure-deployment-5g.
  • "Austin Energy launches school EV program." Texas Public Power, November-December 2018, p. 9.
    Provides information about EVs for Schools, an Austin Energy program that focuses on installing electric vehicle charging stations at Austin Independent School District campuses. Related information at: https://austinenergy.com/ae/green-power/plug-in-austin/school-charging.
  • "Georgetown wins $1 million prize for local solar panels." Texas Public Power, November-December 2018, p. 8.
    Highlights a prize Georgetown won that will be used to generate renewable energy locally. Related information at: https://mayorschallenge.bloomberg.org/ideas/georgetown/.
  • "The forgotten lessons of LBJ's domestic legacy." By Rebecca Shimoni Stoil. Washington Monthly, January/February/March 2019, pp. 33- 37.
    Explores the coalition building behind the success of some aspects of The Great Society, such as Medicare and federal student loans.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, December 20

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Review the final rule related to bump stocks. (U.S. Department of Justice, December 18, 2018)
  • Consider the popularity of vaping among teens. (National Institute on Drug Abuse, December 17, 2018)
  • Explore facets of school safety, including educator training and student mental health. (Federal Commission on School Safety, December 18, 2018)
  • Read about lawsuits related to public officials blocking people on social media. (Nextgov, December 13, 2018)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "Teaching in Texas: Along the border." By Jesus Chavez. ATPE News (Association of Texas Professional Educators), Winter 2018, pp. 22-27.
    Examines how geography and culture influence learning. Profiles teachers whose classrooms are significantly affected by the Texas-Mexico border.
  • "State and local efforts to support young adult mental health: Policy for transformed lives." By Nia West-Bey, Shiva Sethi, and Paige Shortsleeves. Center for Law and Social Policy, November 2018, pp. 1-19.
    Features mental health policies to support young adults ages 18-25 in four states (Maryland, Michigan, New Mexico, and Oregon) and three cities (Louisville, Los Angeles, and New York City). Highlights best practices, challenges, and necessary policy and systems supports for improving young adult mental health.
  • "Texas: Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (state fact sheet 2018)." Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, December 3, 2018, pp. 1-2.
    Provides Texas state demographic data on who participates in SNAP (formerly food stamps), benefits received, and SNAP's economic benefits. Related information at: https://www.cbpp.org/research/food-assistance/a-closer-look-at-who-benefits-from-snap-state-by-state-fact-sheets#Texas.
  • "Many challenges ahead." By David Lerman, et al. CQ Weekly, November 26, 2018, pp. 32-33.
    Summarizes likely agenda for the 116th Congress. Discusses the Democrats' majority in the House of Representatives.
  • "Conquering CO2: Towards zero carbon." Economist Technology Quarterly, December 1, 2018, pp. 3-12.
    Examines whether the problem of a changing climate can be overcome and what it would take to get carbon dioxide out of the global economy.
  • "A smarter war on drugs." By Howard K. Koh, R. Gil Kerlikowske, and Michael P. Botticelli. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), December 11, 2018, pp. 2301-2302.
    Outlines tactics to better address substance use or dependence disorders by connecting the worlds of criminal justice and health, including drug courts, increased access to naloxone for overdoses, diversion from prosecution and jail toward case management and support services, and postoverdose outreach.
  • "The long-term economic forecast for Texas metropolitan areas." By M. Ray Perryman. Perryman Report and Texas Letter, Vol. 35, No. 9, pp. 1-3, 6.
    Provides economic projections for the state's largest metropolitan statistical areas from 2017-2045.
  • "The perfect storm: Flood compliance amid changing environmental, regulatory and financial conditions." By Mark Liston. Texas Banking, December 2018, pp. 14-17.
    Explores the impact of a changing environment and recent "superstorm" hurricanes, such as Hurricane Harvey, on the financial services industry, including the National Flood Insurance Program, and the importance of flood hazard determination for lenders.
  • "Opioid overreach?" By Joey Berlin. Texas Medicine, December 2018, pp. 40-43.
    Details physicians' concerns about opioid prescription restrictions set by pharmacies that sometimes conflict with physicians' lawful orders. Considers the balance between the mandate on pharmacists from the United States Drug Enforcement Administration [DEA] to assess the medical purpose of a prescription for a controlled substance, without the pharmacist crossing over to practicing medicine without a license.
  • "Rural residencies." By Sean Price. Texas Medicine, December 2018, pp. 32-34, 36-37.
    Describes rural residency programs and how they may help identify and recruit physicians who want to practice in rural areas, where there is a shortage of physicians. Notes that there are three such programs in Texas and the difficulty in securing funding for rural residencies, with legislation such as HB2996, 85th Legislature, R.S., not passing.
  • "Expecting care." By Rebecca Grant. Texas Observer, Dec/Jan 2018-19, pp. 20-24, 26.
    Examines the high rate of teen pregnancies in the foster care system in Texas. Report at: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5728d34462cd94b84dc567ed/t/5ad4aa001ae6cfce64d7316f/
    1523886600659/fostering-healthy-texas-lives.pdf
    .
  • "Give me shelter." By Maya Rhodan. Time, November 26, 2018, pp. 36-41.
    Discusses the complex challenges presented by refugees seeking asylum in the United States, including whether asylum can be granted. Focuses on Texas-Mexico border crossings.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, December 13

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Review federal provisions related to compassionate use of investigational drugs. (Congressional Research Service, November 27, 2018)
  • Consider the health risks associated with secondhand smoke. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, December 7, 2018)
  • Read about how Americans access the news. (Pew Research Center, December 3, 2018)
  • Follow the Texas Highway Patrol on social media. (Texas Department of Public Safety, December 11, 2018)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "Under seize." By Mark Walsh. ABA Journal: The Lawyer's Magazine, December 2018, pp. 20-21. Highlights case before the United States Supreme Court, Timbs v. Indiana, which questions whether the Eighth Amendment's prohibition against excessive fines prohibits states and local governments from imposing excessive fines, fees, and civil forfeitures. Related information at: http://www.scotusblog.com/case-files/cases/timbs-v-indiana/.
  • "Education outlook for the 2019 legislative session." By Jennifer Mitchell. ATPE News (Association of Texas Professional Educators), Winter 2018, pp. 16-18.
    Details legislative priorities of the Association of Texas Professional Educators [ATPE] for the 86th legislative session. Addresses school finance, healthcare, pension benefits, compensation, and privatization.
  • "School finance by the numbers." ATPE News (Association of Texas Professional Educators), Winter 2018, pp. 20-21.
    Examines how the school finance system in Texas is affecting educators, students, and taxpayers. Includes statistics on state versus property taxpayer funding, per-student funding, teacher salaries, and more.
  • "An immigration patchwork in the states: How partisanship, regionalism, and shifting priorities impact state immigration laws." By Ramón Cristobal and Teresa Cardinal Brown. Bipartisan Policy Center, November 2018, pp. 1-30 (Note Length).
    Presents an overview of state immigration legislation from 2005–2017, with identification and driver's licenses, budgets, and enforcement as the top three categories of state laws enacted. Explores the effects of partisanship, regional disparities, and local economic factors in the consideration of state immigration legislation.
  • "Lecturer who called police on student wasn't biased but needs training, U. of Texas at San Antonio says." By Emma Pettit. Chronicle of Higher Education, November 23, 2018, p. A19.
    Details a recent incident at the University of Texas at San Antonio in which a lecturer called police to remove a black student from her class. Reports racial bias was not found in this situation, but the incident shows room for improvement around issues of diversity and inclusivity.
  • "'Deal-closing' fund too slow to attract new companies, site selector says." By Bill Hethcock. Dallas Business Journal, November 30, 2018, p. 3.
    Discusses corporate site selectors' assessment of the Texas Enterprise Fund incentive process and timetable.
  • "In patient safety efforts, pharmacists gain new prominence." By Rebecca Gale. Health Affairs, November 2018, pp. 1726-1729.
    Details how states could expand the role pharmacists play in working with patients and medication management. Points out that pharmacists could be on the front lines of improving patients' adherence to prescriptions, with opioids as a key example.
  • "Alternative state-level financing for hepatitis C treatment — The 'Netflix' model." By Mark R. Trusheim, William M. Cassidy, and Peter B. Bach. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), November 20, 2018, pp. 1977-1978.
    Considers the logistics of states making subscription-based arrangements with pharmaceutical corporations to pay for hepatitis C [HCV] treatment for the state's residents. Notes that this Netflix-type arrangement raises regulatory questions but could facilitate important public health gains.
  • "Pillars of fire." By Kevin D. Williamson. National Review, December 3, 2018, pp. 27-30.
    Profiles the oil and gas industry around Midland–Odessa. Considers the problems associated with a shortage of appropriate infrastructure and employees.
  • "Urban cowboys." By Michael Hendrix. National Review, December 3, 2018, pp. 19-20.
    Explains 2018 election results indicate that Texas cities are getting bluer and suburbs are turning purple, while rural areas are getting "redder and emptier." Suggests a Republican aim for future election success might be to keep "Texas attractive for red flight from blue states."
  • "Steel tariffs complicate Permian pipeline buildout." By Natalie Regoli. Oil and Gas Journal, November 5, 2018, pp. 68-71.
    Presents information about how the recent steel and aluminum tariffs are affecting oil and gas operations in the Permian Basin.
  • "Public schools for private gain: The declining American commitment to serving the public good." By David Labaree. Phi Delta Kappan, November 2018, pp. 8-13.
    Explores the progression in thinking of American education's mission from the view of building a better community (public good) to a means for private advancement in pursuit of better jobs (private good). Argues this change has caused society to back away from a social commitment to "other people's children."
  • "Pay up or stay put." By Rebecca Pirius. State Legislatures, November/December 2018, pp. 38-39.
    Reports on several recent state legislative efforts to tackle financial inequities associated with pretrial detention.
  • "Going the distance: Preparing for the 86th Texas Legislative Session is like training for a marathon." By Celeste Embrey. Texas Banking, December 2018, pp. 8-11.
    Previews the 86th Legislature from a banking industry perspective and includes the Texas Bankers Association 2019 legislative agenda.
  • "Parks in peril." By Joe Nick Patoski. Texas Observer, Dec/Jan 2018-19, pp. 12-19.
    Argues that Texas state parks are overburdened and deteriorating due to a variety of factors, including underfunding, an explosion in park visitors, development, and natural disasters. Addresses the Legislature's history of diminished support for the state's parks and what needs to be done to save them from ruin.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, December 6

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Examine long-term Social Security projections. (Congressional Budget Office, December 2018)
  • Review economic data by region in Texas. (Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, 2018)
  • Consider factors that influenced how voters cast their ballots. (Pew Research Center, November 29, 2018)
  • Explore the world's greatest places, including Austin's own public library. (TIME, ©2018)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252. 

  • "Budget drivers: The forces driving state spending." Fiscal Notes, November 2018, pp. 1-12.
    Describes the structure of the General Appropriations Act, the four classifications of state revenue, and limits on state spending. Examines cost drivers in the state budget, primarily in three areas: education, health care, and transportation.
  • "A medical school for the community." By Jessica Bylander. Health Affairs, November 2018, pp. 1732-1735.
    Tells the story of the formation of University of Texas at Austin's Dell Medical School, noting Senator Kirk Watson's role in promoting its funding. Describes how the school reaches out to Austin's poorest residents and its innovative condition-specific bundled payment model.
  • "How many seniors live in poverty?" By Juliette Cubanski, et al. Internet Resource, November 2018, pp. 1-18.
    Analyzes data on poverty rates among older adults in the United States, comparing results using the official poverty measure and the Supplemental Poverty Measure [SPM]. Notes that based on the SPM, at least fifteen percent of people ages 65 and older live in poverty in nine states, including Texas.
  • "Curbing surprise medical bills can be a window into cost control." By Andrew B. Bindman. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), November 27, 2018, pp. 2065-2066.
    Describes the problem of surprise medical bills and notes that some states have passed laws to protect patients. Points out that setting a limit on what both patients and insurers pay health care providers and facilities for out-of-network services could help combat hospitals' anti-competitive practices and result in lower costs for patients.
  • "Millennials under the microscope: Who they are, and how they'll change America." By William H. Frey. Milken Institute Review, 4th Quarter 2018, pp. 64-83.
    Analyzes the demographics of the millennial generation, including size and diversity, language, immigration status, education, homeownership, financial security, and residence in large metropolitan areas. Focuses on the importance of the racial and ethnic diversity of millennials.
  • "The economic forecast for Texas." By M. Ray Perryman. Perryman Report and Texas Letter, Vol. 35, No. 4, pp. 1-3, 6.
    Presents the state's economic forecast for the 2017 to 2022 period. Projects Texas will outpace the nation over the next five years, continuing its upward trend.
  • "Putting the public back into public accountability." By Derek Gottlieb and Jack Schneider. Phi Delta Kappan, November 2018, pp. 29-32.
    Concludes current school accountability systems fail to meaningfully engage the public. Proposes an evaluation system should include the public in defining a broad set of education aims, conducting evaluations, and charting a course for needed improvements.
  • "Utilities and the smart city: Building better communities." By Susan Partain and Paul Ciampoli. Public Power, November/December 2018, pp. 16-23.
    Provides examples of public power utilities that are helping lead smart city projects to help improve their communities, including CPS Energy in San Antonio.
  • "A gamble on sports." By Jackson Brainerd. State Legislatures, November/December 2018, pp. 42-44.
    Discusses policy concerns relating to state legalization and regulation of sports betting.
  • "Texas growers testify, stress need for eminent domain reform." By Jennifer Dorsett. Texas Agriculture, November 2, 2018, p. 18.
    Discusses the Texas Farm Bureau's legislative agenda for the 86th Legislature, which calls for reforms to how eminent domain proceedings are conducted between private companies and landowners.
  • "How population, economic growth will impact eminent domain law." By Luke Ellis and Justin Hodge. Texas Lawyer, December 2018, pp. 18, 20.
    Discusses the challenges presented in balancing the government's need to expand public infrastructure with the need to protect property rights. Illustrates how a shared border with Mexico, a thriving oil and gas economy, and population growth are creating eminent domain issues in federal and state courts.
  • "CPS Energy launches solar energy and battery storage project." Texas Public Power, October 2018, pp. 1, 8.
    Details CPS Energy's latest project involving battery storage, which received a grant from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to help pay for some of the costs. Related information at: https://www.cpsenergy.com/flexiblepath and https://www.tceq.texas.gov/airquality/terp/
    ntig.html
    .

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

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