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Bill Statistics, 133rd Day

Bill statistics comparing the 133rd day of the 86th and the 85th Regular Sessions are below. For information about what happens to a bill after it passes, please see our Legislative FAQ page. To learn more about the legislative process and see bill statistics for earlier points in the 86th Regular Session, check out some of our recent blog posts

 

 

New & Noteworthy: May 2019

The Library is continually adding new books to its collection. Below are the seven titles from our May 2019 New & Noteworthy list

Check out and delivery of New & Noteworthy titles is available to legislative staff in Capitol and District offices. To arrange check out and delivery of any of these items, you can submit an online request through the New & Noteworthy page on our website, contact the library at 512-463-1252, or use our PDF request form.

 

1. Texas Rules of Form: The Green Book
By University of Texas School of Law
Clarifies how to cite legal authorities unique to Texas. Includes formatting guidance for bills & resolutions, fiscal notes & bill analyses, committee minutes, testimony, debates, House & Senate journals, House & Senate rules, veto messages, and statutes.
Texas Law Review, 2018. 150 pages.
340.03 T313 2018


 

 

2. Texas Legislative Law Handbook
By Kevin C. Stewart and Andrew Cates
Provides guidance on how to navigate the legislative process in Texas. Includes chapters on statutory interpretation, administrative law, principles relating to points of order as well as campaign and ethics law. Features appendices with drafting and bill-scrubbing checklists, a rule referencing list, and vote requirements of each chamber.
The Law Offices of Kevin C. Stewart, 2018. 270 pages.
328.764 ST49T 2018


 

 

3. Texas House Practice
By Hugh L. Brady, ed.
Addresses the standing rules and precedents of the Texas House of Representatives for the 85th Legislature. Includes practice notes, congressional rules and precedents, and references to provisions of the Texas Constitution and laws, Texas Attorney General opinions, and court decisions.
Talbot Publishers, 2017. 415 pages.
328.764 T313H 2017


 

 

4. Texas Senate Practice
By Hugh L. Brady and Ross O. Peavey, editors
Addresses the standing rules and precedents of the Texas Senate for the 85th Legislature. Includes practice notes, congressional rules and precedents, and references to provisions of the Texas Constitution and laws, Texas Attorney General opinions, and court decisions.
Talbot Publishers, 2017. 209 pages.
328.764 T313S 2017


 

 

5. Mason's Manual of Legislative Procedure
By National Conference of State Legislatures
Provides information on legislative procedure in a parliamentary manual designed specifically for state legislatures. Addresses problems and concepts in the contexts that occur most often in legislative bodies. Notes this manual is used by more than 70 percent of the nation’s legislatures.
National Conference of State Legislatures, 2010. 752 pages.
328.735 M381 2010


 

 

6. Metaphors Be With You: An A-To-Z Dictionary of History's Greatest Metaphorical Quotations
By Mardy Grothe
Presents a compendium of metaphorical quotations representing "the very best things that have ever been said" about 250 topics including literature, politics, philosophy, religion, and history. Organizes the quotations by topic and uses QR Codes to link each of the topics covered in the book to its corresponding section in an online database of more than 25,000 metaphorical quotations. Notes that source information for the quotations is not provided in the book, but citations for the quotations - and much more - can be found in the online database.
Harper, 2016. 478 pages.
Online at: http://www.drmardy.com/dmdmq/
808.882 G915M 2016

 

 

Current Articles & Research Resources, May 16

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Read about opting out of face recognition at airports. (Electronic Frontier Foundation, April 24, 2019)
  • Consider what some states are doing to help mental health professionals maintain a license. (National Conference of State Legislatures, May 2019)
  • Explore an interactive online experience related to D-Day. (Library of Congress, May 10, 2019)
  • Examine statistics related to the birth rate in the United States. (National Vital Statistics System, May 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Selling a home may soon require more disclosures." By Kimberly Reeves. Austin Business Journal, May 10, 2019, p. A12.
    Highlights SB339, 86th Legislature, which proposes new disclosure rules when selling a home, such as more information about flooding risks. Includes comment by Senator Joan Huffman.
  • "Micro-brew, macro-fees: Texas law favors beer distributors while curbing growth and investment in the nation's third largest craft beer market." By Daniel P. Pellegrin, Jr. Baylor Law Review, Winter 2019, pp. 190-212. (Note length)
    Surveys the history of the three tier system within the alcohol industry and Texas laws and regulations specifically related to the manufacture and distribution of beer. Discusses how the growth of the craft beer market has changed the industry and how recent legislation, including SB518, 83rd Regular Session, is affecting growth.
  • "Arriving at the Supreme Court: Census controversy." By Henry Gass. Christian Science Monitor, April 22 & 29, 2019, p. 15.
    Presents a question and answer discussion of Department of Commerce, et al. v. New York, et al., the case currently before the United States Supreme Court dealing with including a citizenship question on the census.
  • "Everyone agrees the U.S. needs to fix the border. But how?" By Henry Gass. Christian Science Monitor, May 6, 2019, pp. 8-9.
    Discusses the areas of immigration law the Trump administration is seeking to change. Explores other ideas for improving the border and immigration situation such as viewing the border as an ecosystem affected by a number of variables and improving the dysfunctional immigration court system.
  • "'It's an aristocracy': What the admissions-bribery scandal has exposed about class on campus." By Jack Stripling. Chronicle of Higher Education, April 26, 2019, pp. A22-A23.
    Analyzes the college admissions-bribery scandal in terms of the codependent relationship between top-tier colleges and the "power elite" who provide endowments, buildings, and pay full tuition for their children. Presents a sidebar displaying students from the bottom 40 percent in income level, and those at the top 20 percent and top 10 percent income levels at eight universities, including the University of Texas at Austin.
  • "Education Dept. deal ends a medical school's use of race in admissions." By Nell Gluckman. Chronicle of Higher Education, April 26, 2019, p. A35.
    Highlights a recent agreement between the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and the United States Department of Education that prohibits the school from considering race when making admissions decisions.
  • "Presidential power: The chief-executive branch."  Economist, May 11th-17th, 2019, pp. 21-22.
    Discusses how President Trump's refusal to comply with congressional subpoenas is reshaping the relationship between Congress and the presidency and how Congress exercises its oversight powers to check the executive branch.
  • "Graduate education: Is it worth it?" By Gustavo A. Mellander. Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education, April/May 2019, pp. 6-7.
    Points out the fastest growing jobs through 2036: health care, computers, and clean energy professionals. Suggests graduate education will be necessary for the best jobs.
  • "Resisting the allure of gross receipt taxes: An assessment of their costs and consequences." By Garrett Watson. Journal of Multistate Taxation and Incentives May 2019, pp. 6-17, 48.
    Discusses the history of gross receipts taxes and their negative economic effects. Discusses the Texas Margin Tax.
  • "Prisoners of profit: Prisons are at the center of a privatization bonanza — and private equity companies are playing an outsize role." By Tim Requarth. Nation, May 13, 2019, pp. 12-19, 25.
    Details the expansion of privatized services in publicly-operated jails and prisons in the United States, including prison phone calls, inmate transportation, medical and mental health care, and commissary and food services. Mentions a Texas lawsuit on medical treatment and exploding prison populations (Estelle v. Gamble) and notes the highest cost of a 15-minute phone call from a local jail in Texas is $17.25.
  • "Wanted: Digital whizzes to work in agriculture." By April Simpson. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), May 9, 2019, pp. 1-6.
    Discusses the future of agricultural education. Points out too few college graduates have the technical precision agriculture skills that agribusiness employers need.
  • "The new Texans." By Luis B. Torres and Wesley Miller. Tierra Grande, April 2019, pp. 6-8.
    Discusses the makeup of foreign-born residents in Texas. Examines how this group is changing along with the skills of its workforce.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

 

Bill Statistics & Upcoming Deadlines, May 13

As the 86th Legislature draws to a close, a series of end-of-session deadlines begin to take effect. Below is a list of deadlines that occur next week:

  • Monday, May 20: Deadline for house to distribute last House Local & Consent Calendar with senate bills.
  • Tuesday, May 21: Last day for house to consider second reading senate bills and senate joint resolutions on the House Daily or Supplemental Calendar.
  • Wednesday, May 22: Last day for house to consider local and consent senate bills on second and third reading, and all third reading senate bills and senate joint resolutions on the House Supplemental Calendar. Last day for senate to consider all bills and joint resolutions on second or third reading.
  • Thursday, May 23: Midnight deadline for house to distribute senate amendments.
  • Friday, May 24: Last day for house to act on senate amendments. Midnight deadline for senate to print and distribute senate copies of conference committee reports on tax, general appropriations, and reapportionment bills.
  • Saturday, May 25: Midnight deadline for house to distribute house copies of all conference committee reports. Midnight deadline for senate to print and distribute senate copies of all conference committee reports on bills other than tax, general appropriations, and reapportionment bills, and all house amendments to senate bills and joint resolutions that did not go to conference committee.
  • Sunday, May 26: Last day for house to adopt conference committee reports or discharge house conferees and concur in senate amendments. Last day for senate to concure in house amendments or adopt conference committee reports.
  • Monday, May 27: Last day of the 85th Regular Session (sine die); only corrections may be considered in house and senate.

House and Senate calendars are available on the Texas Legislature Online, and Senate agendas are available in hard copy from the library (Rm. 2N.3). 

 

Bill statistics for the period of Nov. 12, 2018 - May 10, 2019 are below.

  House Bills (HB) & Joint Resolutions (HJR) Senate Bills (SB) & Joint Resolutions (SJR)
Filed  4,912 2,629
Reported out of committee 2,291 906
Passed by chamber of origin 1,449 777
Referred to committee in opposite chamber 1,179 736
Reported out of committee in opposite chamber 313 419
Passed opposite chamber 142 93
Signed by the Governor 8 21

 

 

 

 

Current Articles & Research Resources, May 9

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • See how different types of natural disasters affect different parts of the country. (The Washington Post, April 25, 2019)
  • Find free online courses in law and legal topics. (Inner Temple Library, April 2019)
  • Examine statistics about pregnancy-related deaths. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2019)
  • Explore aspects of voter turnout for the 2018 midterm elections. (Pew Research Center, May 1, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Facecourt?" By Mark F. Walsh. ABA Journal: The Lawyer's Magazine, May 2019, pp. 52-57.
    Discusses Facebook's plans to create a judicial-like body to address controversial speech. Examines how this oversight board will function and how board members will be chosen.
  • "The next George Bush." By Elaine Plott. Atlantic Monthly, May 2019, pp. 22-25.
    Profiles George P. Bush, Texas Land Commissioner, and discusses his role in the future of Republican politics.
  • "Craft breweries closer to winning on to-go sales." By Kimberly Reeves. Austin Business Journal, May 3, 2019, p. 15.
    Discusses proposed legislation that would permit statewide sales of craft beer to go. Includes comments by Representative Eddie Rodriguez and mentions Representative Chris Paddie.
  • "Will Muny be saved?" By Daniel Salazar. Austin Business Journal, May 3, 2019, pp. 4-7.
    Reports on efforts to protect Austin's historic Lions Municipal Golf Course from development. Mentions Senator Kirk Watson and SB2553, 86th Legislature, relating to the creation of the Save Historic Muny District.
  • "The US southern border, in numbers." By Henry Gass. Christian Science Monitor, April 15, 2019, pp. A8-A10, A12, A14.
    Profiles Amarillo College's No Excuses Poverty Initiative which partners with the community to offer a wide array of support to students. Explains this program recognizes that poverty and not academic demands can pose the biggest barrier to student success in community colleges.
  • "Parsing prayer policies." By Liz Hayes. Church & State, May 2019, pp. 4-6.
    Reports on governmental entities' struggles to comply with the 2014 United States Supreme Court decision, Town of Greece v. Galloway, which set new standards on government-sponsored invocations.
  • "Funding water infrastructure: How Texas pays for water."  By Spencer Grubbs and Shannon Halbrook. Fiscal Notes, April 2019, pp. 7-10.
    Reviews water infrastructure financing procedures and notable projects of the State Water Implementation Fund of Texas (SWIFT), passed in 2013 as a result of devastating droughts (SJR1 and HB4, 83rd Legislature, R.S.).
  • "How childhood has changed for tweens." By Phyllis L. Fagell. Phi Delta Kappan, April 2019, pp. 8-12.
    Considers three ways in which childhood is different for 21st century adolescents. Discusses the effects of an increased use of technology, mental health challenges, and an awareness of identity issues.
  • "Can rooftop solar survive declining subsidies?: A case study in Louisiana." By Greg Upton. Public Utilities Fortnightly April 2019, pp. 52-54.
    Summarizes a recent white paper from Louisiana State University's Center for Energy Studies. Provides a case study of recent policy changes in Louisiana regarding subsidies for solar energy installations. (Related document at: http://lpscstar.louisiana.gov/star/portal/lpsc/PSC/DocketDetails.aspx?DocketId=822f39ca-66c5-4b39-a5bd-e5c5b76dbcc1).
  • "Solar, a strategy for decarbonizing the grid and increasing resilience: For your consideration." By Joe Song and Sachu Constantine. Public Utilities Fortnightly, April 2019, pp. 48-51.
    Explores how solar energy systems can help improve the electric grid. Points out the performance of commercial solar in the wake of Hurricane Florence.
  • "When gun control is censorship." By Zach Weissmueller. Reason, May 2019, p. 42-29.
    Interviews Paloma Heindorff, the recently installed chief of Defense Distributed, the Austin-based company that gained notoriety by making a usable plastic handgun with a 3D printer. Presents her views on the company's ongoing legal battles dealing with digital gun-making.
  • "Warning signs." By Christopher Collins. Texas Observer, May/June 2019, pp. 12-19.
    Investigates the high rate of suicide in rural Texas and the barriers to mental health care that are worsening the crisis.
  • "Contrasting costs." By Ali Anari. Tierra Grande, April 2019, pp. 2-5.
    Investigates the high rate of suicide in rural Texas and the barriers to mental health care that are worsening the crisis.
  • "Public spending on infants and toddlers in six charts: A kids' share brief." By Julia B. Isaacs, et al. Urban Institute Brief, May 6, 2019, pp. 1-11.
    Summarizes federal and state spending on infants and toddlers through programs and tax reductions. Finds lower levels of state and local spending on this age group.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

 

Bill Statistics & Upcoming Deadlines, May 6

As the 86th Legislature draws to a close, a series of end-of-session deadlines begin to take effect. Below is a list of deadlines that occur next week:

  • Wednesday, May 15: 9 a.m. Deadline for house to distribute its last House Local & Consent Calendar with local house bills.
  • Friday, May 17: Last day for house to consider local house bills on second and third reading. First day senate can consider bills and resolutions the first day they are posted on the Senate Intent Calendar.
  • Saturday, May 18: Last day for house committees to report senate bills and senate joint resolutions.
  • Sunday, May 19: 10 p.m. Deadline for house to distribute its last House Daily Calendar with senate bills and senate joint resolutions.

House and Senate calendars are available on the Texas Legislature Online, and Senate agendas are available in hard copy from the library (Rm. 2N.3). 

 

Bill statistics for the period of Nov. 12, 2018 - May 3, 2019 are below.

  House Bills (HB) & Joint Resolutions (HJR) Senate Bills (SB) & Joint Resolutions (SJR)
Filed  4,911 2,629
Reported out of committee 2,278 866
Passed by chamber of origin 1,111 720
Referred to committee in opposite chamber 708 592
Reported out of committee in opposite chamber 115 270
Passed opposite chamber 41 63
Signed by the Governor 3 5

 

 

Current Articles & Research Resources, May 2

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Examine guidance related to addressing natural disaster debris . (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, April 2019)
  • Review figures related to the cost of war to the U.S. since 9/11. (Congressional Research Service, April 18, 2019)
  • Check by VIN whether a vehicle is under a recall. (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, accessed May 1, 2019)
  • Read a recent report of the Texas Women's Health Program. (Texas Health and Human Services Commission, May 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "It's time for states to invest in infrastructure (2019)." By Elizabeth C. McNichol. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Updated March 19, 2019, pp. 1-22. (Note length)
    Discusses the critical need for state investments in public infrastructure, including transportation, roads, bridges, airports, public buildings, and water and sewer treatment systems, and the economic, business, and environmental benefits of infrastructure improvement. Includes a 50-state table of state and local capital spending by state since 2000 as a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP), with Texas at 2.14 percent for 2016.
  • "Former student aid." By Jacob Fischler. CQ Weekly, April 1, 2019, pp. 27-29.
    Addresses oversight of the student loan industry at the state level. Discusses states' legislative efforts to require student loan servicers to be licensed by state-level agencies.
  • "The future of cars: Charging ahead." Economist, April 20th-26th, 2019, pp. 57-59.
    Presents an optimistic forecast for increased production and sales of electric vehicles, noting major car companies are rethinking their established business models.
  • "Minimum wages: Floored."  Economist, April 27th-May 3rd, 2019, pp. 21, 24.
    Reports state and local governments are causing the federal pay floor to be left behind, making the federal minimum wage irrelevant.
  • "States' progress uneven in K-12 funding battles." By Daarel Burnette II. Education Week, April 17, 2019, pp. 14, 16.
    Provides a snapshot of current legislative efforts by states, including Texas, to overhaul their antiquated and often inequitable systems of funding K-12 schools.
  • "Texas water: Planning for more." By Spencer Grubbs, et al. Fiscal Notes, April 2019, pp. 1, 3-6.
    Analyzes trends in Texas water supply and demand, surface water infrastructure, and the continuing challenge presented by droughts.
  • "Amending the Peeler doctrine: How to provide convicted plaintiffs an equitable opportunity to pursue legal malpractice claims."  By Nicholas Van Cleve. Houston Law Review, 2019, pp. 927-963. (Note length)
    Examines the inability of convicted plaintiffs to sue for legal malpractice and the evolution of the Peeler doctrine since the 1995 Texas Supreme Court ruling. Compares the doctrine to rules in other states and suggests alternatives to the present system in Texas.
  • "CARB [California Air Resources Board] calls for improved monitoring around refineries, communities." By Nick Snow. Oil and Gas Journal, April 1, 2019, pp. 29-30.
    Reports on California's efforts to monitor air quality around refineries. Notes that these efforts resulted from a fire that raised concerns regarding emergency preparedness. References recommendations from a recent report.
  • "Recession graduates: The long-lasting effects of an unlucky draw." By Hannes Schwandt. Policy Brief (Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research), April 18, 2019, pp. 1-4.
    Examines the effects of temporary economic fluctuations on socioeconomic status, health, and mortality.
  • "Environmental responsibility: The cornerstone of public power." By Betsy Loeff. Public Power, March/April 2019, pp. 38-42.
    Looks at the different ways three public power utilities have implemented sustainable initiatives. Refers to the United States Environmental Protection Agency's proposed Affordable Clean Energy rule.
  • "It's time to update public financing of public infrastructure." By John Godfrey. Public Power, March/April 2019, p. 45.
    Argues that Congress should modernize bonds as a way to update public infrastructure financing.
  • "The flood next time." By Gus Bova. Texas Observer, May/June 2019, pp. 20-25.
    Discusses flooding risks of the proposed border wall for the Rio Grande floodplain to Texas counties and Mexico. Argues a lack of transparency has prevented input from local officials on any detailed plans for the border wall and has increased the probability of devastating flooding in their communities.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

 

Bill Statistics & Upcoming Deadlines, April 29

As the 86th Legislature draws to a close, a series of end-of-session deadlines begin to take effect. Below is a list of deadlines that occur next week:

  • Monday, May 6: Last day for house committees to report house bills and house joint resolutions.
  • Tuesday, May 7: Deadline for house to distribute last House Daily Calendar with house bills and house joint resolutions.
  • Wednesday, May 8: Deadline for house to distribute last House Local and Consent Calendar with consent house bills.
  • Thursday, May 9: Last day for house to consider house bills and house joint resolutions on second reading on House Daily or Supplemental Calendar.
  • Friday, May 10: Last day for house to consider consent house bills on second and third reading and all third reading house bills or house joint resolutions on House Supplemental Calendar.

House and Senate calendars are available on the Texas Legislature Online, and Senate agendas are available in hard copy from the library (Rm. 2N.3). 

Bill statistics for the period of Nov. 12, 2018 - April 26, 2019 are below.

  House Bills (HB) & Joint Resolutions (HJR) Senate Bills (SB) & Joint Resolutions (SJR)
Filed  4,908 2,625
Reported out of committee 2,155 800
Passed by chamber of origin 696 580
Referred to committee in opposite chamber 403 440
Reported out of committee in opposite chamber 28 152
Passed opposite chamber 6 27
Signed by the Governor 0 0

 

 

Current Articles & Research Resources, April 25

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community. 

  • Explore agricultural activity in America. (U.S. Department of Agriculture, April 11, 2019)
  • Examine recent statistics related to school crime and safety. (National Center for Education Statistics, April 2019)
  • Consider how access to special education varies by state. (U.S. Government Accountability Office, April 2019)
  • See how Dallas and Houston metropolitan areas have become some of the most populous in the nation. (U.S. Census Bureau, April 18, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "How much immigration is too much?" By David Frum. Atlantic Monthly, April 2019, pp. 64-74.
    Argues effective immigration policy can make the United States a stronger, richer country for newcomers and long-settled citizens. Suggests replacing the current patchwork of policies with a new policy focusing on reducing immigration and selecting immigrants more carefully.
  • "Going green: Marijuana policy impacts on state budgets." By Lisa McKinney. Capitol Ideas, Issue 1 2019, pp. 14-15.
    Describes the marijuana legalization process in Massachusetts and Colorado and the increased tax revenue to state budgets. Notes a recent analysis by New Frontier Data showing a full federal legalization of marijuana would generate $108 billion over seven years.
  • "Three new ways for Congress to legalize illegal immigrants." By Alex Nowrasteh and David J. Bier. CATO Briefing Papers, April 10, 2019, pp. 1-6.
    Offers innovative proposals that overcome some of the political objections to granting legal status to illegal immigrants: tiered legalization, rolling legalization, and amnesty with limited family sponsorship.
  • "The revival of 'made in the USA'." By Laurent Belsie. Christian Science Monitor, April 8, 2019, p. 1.
    Highlights the rise in manufacturing jobs under the Obama and Trump administrations in terms of whether the momentum will continue and how tariffs might affect these jobs.
  • "Teaching or preaching?" By Rob Boston. Church & State, April 2019, pp. 10-13.
    Examines school district curricula for Bible literacy classes. Finds that state legislation often outlines evangelistic goals, making objective instruction elusive. Mentions HB1287, 80th Texas Legislature, relating to the academic study of the Bible in public schools. (Report at: http://a.tfn.org/site/DocServer/TFNEF_ReadingWritingReligionII.pdf?docID=3481)
  • "Will home sales prices become public?" By Kimberly Reeves. Dallas Business Journal, April 12, 2019, p. 2.
    Discusses HB1036, 86th Legislature, relating to mandatory sales price disclosure in real property sales. Includes comments by Representatives Michelle Beckley and Trey Martinez Fischer.
  • "Abortion controls: In a heartbeat."  Economist, April 13th-19th, 2019, p. 27.
    Examines whether the rush of state-level heartbeat bills will achieve pro-lifers' goal — getting the United States Supreme Court to weigh in on the issue and using one of these bills to overturn Roe v. Wade.
  • "Teaching migrant children." By Kavitha Cardoza. Education Week, April 10, 2019, pp. 12-16.
    Addresses the impact of migrant children, who have sought asylum in the United States, on public schools. Profiles several migrant students and their experiences in public schools across the nation, including Texas.
  • "Little public support for reductions in federal spending." By Pew Research Center. Internet Resource, April 11, 2019, pp. 1-29. (Note lenth)
    Reports findings from a Pew Research Center survey on federal spending across thirteen government program areas. Analyzes partisan differences in spending increases and the size and scope of the federal government.
  • "Parsing the waters." By Charles N. Herrick. Issues in Science and Technology, Spring 2019, pp. 77-83.
    Provides a history of federal legislation related to the reclamation and protection of wetlands. Discusses recent changes to domestic wetlands policy and provides recommendations for future legislation and management.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

 

New & Noteworthy: April 2019

The Library is continually adding new books to its collection. Below are the seven titles from our April 2019 New & Noteworthy list

Check out and delivery of New & Noteworthy titles is available to legislative staff in Capitol and District offices. To arrange check out and delivery of any of these items, you can submit an online request through the New & Noteworthy page on our website, contact the library at 512-463-1252, or use our PDF request form.

 

1. Summary of Senate Committee Substitute for House Bill 1: 2020-21 Biennium
By Legislative Budget Board
Presents an overview of the General Appropriations Bill. Provides the total appropriations for the 2020–21 biennium by each method of finance for each article in the bill compared to the 2018–19 biennium. Highlights major funding items, significant policy, and fiscal issues. Addresses constitutional spending limits, the Rainy Day Fund, and the Texas Economic Outlook. Includes article specific chapters, bill comparisons, and a reader's guide to the General Appropriations Bill.
Legislative Budget Board, 2019. 134 pages.
Online at: http://www.lbb.state.tx.us/Documents/Appropriations_Bills/86/Senate/5768_Summary_Senate_Committee_Substitute_House_Bill_1_86.pdf
L1300.8 B859 2020_21SS


 

 

2. Summary of House Committee Substitute for House Bill 1: 2020-21 Biennium
By Legislative Budget Board
Presents an overview of the General Appropriations Bill. Provides the total appropriations for the 2020–21 biennium by each method of finance for each article in the bill compared to the 2018–19 biennium. Highlights major funding items, significant policy, and fiscal issues. Addresses constitutional spending limits, the Rainy Day Fund, and the Texas Economic Outlook. Includes article specific chapters, bill comparisons, and a reader's guide to the General Appropriations Bill.
Legislative Budget Board, 2019. 140 pages.
Online at: http://www.lbb.state.tx.us/Documents/Appropriations_Bills/86/House/5692_Bill_Summary_House_Committee.pdf
L1300.8 B859 2020_21SH


 

 

3. CSHB 1, the House Appropriations Committee's Proposed Budget for Fiscal 2020-21
By House Research Organization
Provides an overview of the proposed state budget and of each article of CSHB 1. Highlights significant budget issues, including proposals for funding individual agencies and programs.
House Research Organization, 2019. 40 pages.
Online at: https://hro.house.texas.gov/pdf/focus/2019CSHB_1.pdf
L1801.9 ST94 86F-2


 

 

4. Women's Suffrage in Texas: Struggle, the Story: Successes, Notable Firsts: Senators, Women of the Texas Senate
By Texas Senate
Presents the achievements of women in Texas in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment. Describes the struggle for suffrage and the legislative efforts to achieve enfranchisement for women. Provides brief biographies of significant women in Texas, including former and current Texas Senators. Notes that since the first woman was elected to a statewide office a century ago, Texas women have served at every level of state and local government - currently there are 33 women in the Texas House of Representatives and 9 in the Texas Senate.
Texas Senate, 2019. 63 pages.
L1803.8 W842 2019


 

 

5. Trains, Buses, People: An Opinionated Atlas of US Transit
By Christof Spieler
Offers a roadmap for building effective public transit. Compares 47 metropolitan areas in the U.S. that have rail transit or Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), using data, photos, and maps. Ranks best and worst systems and offers analysis of how geography, politics, and history complicate transit planning. Includes discussion of transit systems in Austin, Dallas, and Houston.
Island Press, 2018. 251 pages.
388.4 SP44T 2018


 

 

6. Where is Sam Houston Buried?: A Tour of the Graves of the Governors of Texas
By John Swearingen
Reports on the burial location of each governor of Texas from James P. Henderson to Ann Richards. Profiles each governor in a one-page entry that includes a portrait of the governor, photograph of the gravesite, and brief facts about the governor's life and career.
2015. 56 pages.
923.2 SW31W 2015


 

 

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