LRL Home - Points of Interest

Current Articles & Research Resources, August 15

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Examine safety concerns related to automated vehicles. (Governors Highway Safety Association, August 6, 2019)
  • Explore resources and statistics related to capital punishment. (National Conference of State Legislatures, July 30, 2019)
  • Consider precautions to prevent wildfires before operating equipment outdoors. (Texas A&M Forest Service, August 12, 2019)
  • Review pedestrian safety tips. (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, July 15, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Face off? The promises and perils of losing anonymity." By Eoin O'Carroll. Christian Science Monitor, July 29, 2019, pp. 18-19.
    Discusses the growing use of facial recognition technology and the resulting concerns about its application. Identifies early attempts at legislating its use.
  • "Oncor's powerful response to severe situations." By Catherine Leffert. Dallas Business Journal, August 2, 2019, pp. 12-14.
    Discusses how Oncor Electric Delivery handles mass power outages. Points out the emergency management preparedness strategies that enabled the rapid restoration of power to thousands of Dallas-Fort Worth customers affected by severe storms that struck on June 9.
  • "The economics of Texas BBQ: It's not your grandpa's barbecue anymore." By Patrick Graves. Fiscal Notes, July 2019, pp. 1-6.
    Explores the economic growth and recent diversification of the barbecue industry in Texas. Notes there are now 2,500 Texas barbecue outlets, an increase of 12 percent from four years ago. 
  • "The workforce-training grant: A new bridge from high school to career." By Oren Cass. Issue Brief (Manhattan Institute), July 16, 2019, pp. 1-14.
    Proposes a grant-based program to motivate private-sector employers to provide on-the-job experience with employer-sponsored training to people who do not pursue a college degree as their path to employment.
  • "Can taxes and subsidies improve health?" By Ramanan Laxminarayan and Amit Summan. Milken Institute Review, Third Quarter 2019, pp. 18-27.
    Examines the effectiveness of "sin taxes" on tobacco and alcohol, and other taxes on sodas and junk food, in public health policy. Looks at the option of redirecting agricultural or energy subsidies to healthy foods.
  • "Will America ever have high-speed trains?" By Lawrence M. Fisher. Milken Institute Review, Third Quarter 2019, pp. 70-80.
    Explores the potential for high-speed rail in the United States, amid "buy American" stipulations for governments receiving federal funds. Discusses cost overruns, engineering controversy, and delays in the California High-Speed Rail project. Considers the development and eminent domain concerns of the Texas Central Railway project from Dallas-Fort Worth to Houston.
  • "Myths of student-loan debt." By Robert Verbruggen. National Review, July 29, 2019, pp. 28-30.
    Recommends solving the student-loan debt problem with increased use of the "income-share agreement" [ISA], in which a student agrees to pay a certain percentage of income for a certain number of years in exchange for the lender funding his education.
  • "2018 carbon dioxide emission trends: Explaining the 2018 increase." By Daniel Klein. Public Utilities Fortnightly, July 2019, pp. 122-127.
    Analyzes the United States Energy Information Administration's [EIA] first full year's estimates of energy use and carbon dioxide emissions during 2018. Related information at: https://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/.
  • "Toolbox: Redrawing maps the right way." By Jeffrey M. Wice and Frank M. Strigari. State Legislatures, July/August 2019, pp. 38-40.
    Offers suggestions on how to improve the redistricting process and avoid costly litigation. 
  • "The 141st day." By Celeste Embrey. Texas Banking, August 2019, pp. 8-11.
    Presents a session wrap-up of banking issues, including subcontractors, Sunset legislation, the Equifax data breach, and cybersecurity.
  • "Charting medicine's statehouse progress." By Joey Berlin and Sean Price. Texas Medicine, August 2019, pp. 16-24.
    Recaps the 86th Texas Legislature, highlighting enrolled legislation significant to physicians and health care. 
  • "Making telemedicine work." By Sean Price. Texas Medicine, August 2019, pp. 26-29.
    Outlines the steps physicians should take when preparing to provide telemedicine services. Highlights HB3345, 86th Legislature, which will help physicians choose the best telemedicine platform for them. 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Library Update

After being in our restored space for more than 20 years, the Texas State Preservation Board has planned a renovation of the Legislative Reference Library. New carpet, paint, public computer stations, added staff work areas, and other updates are on the horizon for the LRL.

 

As with any big renovation project, this means that the LRL's operations will have to temporarily relocate from the Capitol! We will be based on the fourth floor of the John H. Reagan Building; our Capitol space will be closed. The LRL will continue to offer reference and research assistance, check out library materials, send Current Articles and New & Noteworthy emails, produce the Legislative Clipping Service, and provide other library services. The renovation will begin in August and will take approximately five months.

 

Please continue to call us at (512) 463-1252 and/or email us at LRL.Service@lrl.texas.gov with your reference and research needs.

 

Current Articles & Research Resources, August 8

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Explore reasons the teen birth rate is dropping. (Pew Research Center, August 2, 2019)
  • Track President Trump's judicial appointments. (Heritage Foundation, updated August 2, 2019)
  • Consider whether college should come with a money-back guarantee. (Manhattan Institute, July 9, 2019)
  • Learn what to expect about invitations to respond to the 2020 Census. (U.S. Census Bureau, May 9, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Behind the 'cannabusiness' boom." By Paul Thompson. Austin Business Journal, August 2, 2019, pp. 12-15.
    Discusses how HB3703 and HB1325, 86th Legislature, are paving the way for hemp and cannabis product entrepreneurs to flourish.
  • "The real cannabis rush." By Craig Giammona, Bruce Einhorn, and Ashley Robinson. Bloomberg Businessweek, July 22, 2019, pp. 16-18.
    Examines the economic effects of the legalization of hemp and hemp products. Questions whether hemp will saturate the global market and affect prices.
  • "Special report: DFW's opportunity knocks." By Craig M. Douglas and Claire Ballor. Dallas Business Journal, July 26, 2019, pp. 14-19.
    Presents a primer on the Opportunity Zone program established under the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act and raises potential red flags. Identifies designated opportunity zones in core Dallas-Fort Worth counties.
  • "Overcrowded primaries: A Democratic dilemma." Economist, July 27th-August 2nd, 2019, pp. 19-20.
    Traces the roots of the current system of nominating presidential candidates. Considers whether political parties should let anyone run for president.
  • "The changing landscape of homeschooling in the United States." By Aaron Hirsh. Internet Resource, July 2019, pp. 1-8.
    Examines the state of homeschooling in the United States in 2019. Includes discussion of the changing demographics of homeschoolers, the new models of homeschooling, and state policies that govern homeschooling.
  • "Student debt: An overlooked barrier to increasing teacher diversity." By Bayliss Fiddiman, Colleen Campbell, and Lisette Partelow. Internet Resource, July 9, 2019, pp. 1-18.
    Examines the student loan debt of Black and Latinx teachers. Argues the debt burden of teachers of color is a deterrent to diversifying the teaching workforce. Offers policy recommendations for reducing the student debt of minority teachers and increasing the chances they will enter or remain in the teaching profession.
  • "California energy storage initiatives: Surfing the storage wave." By Nathan C. Howe, Stuart Murray, and Sarah Elias. Natural Resources & Environment, Summer 2019, pp. 18-22.
    Discusses California's policy initiatives in energy storage development that have resulted from their increased use of intermittent renewable energy resources such as wind and solar power. Highlights the efforts of other jurisdictions active in storage development, including: minimum storage capacity targets, wholesale market frameworks, and new rate structures to incentivize customer storage.
  • "Permian pipeline projects race to remove export bottlenecks." By Christopher E. Smith. Oil and Gas Journal, July 1, 2019, pp. 59-61.
    Highlights planned pipeline projects that will help transport crude oil from the Permian Basin to the Gulf Coast.
  • "Wanted: Lawyers for rural America." By April Simpson. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), June 26, 2019, pp. 1-7.
    Reports the decline of rural lawyers has created "legal deserts" in several states, limiting vulnerable populations' access to legal representation. Discusses several states' efforts to curb the decline and to use non-lawyers to narrow the justice gap.
  • "Lingering effects of subprime lending." By Luis B. Torres, Carter Neill, and Clare Losey. Tierra Grande, July 2019, pp. 19-25.
    Examines how mortgage lending has changed in Texas since the fallout from subprime lending and the Great Recession. Details changes by city and race for Austin, Dallas/Fort Worth, Houston, and San Antonio.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Resource Highlight: Legislative Committee Minutes Online

The following legislative committee minutes in the LRL collection are scanned and available on our Committee minutes and related documents page:

 

House: 42nd – 77th

Senate: 27th – 77th

Interim: 38th – 77th

 

We most recently added interim minutes from the 62nd Legislature (1971-1972). As always, some committees are unique (see the interim committees on vegetable marketing and imported fire ant infestation), and others address major issues like school finance and coastal resources that the Legislature continues to work on today.

 

Minutes and other committee records from the 77th Legislature (2001) onward are available via Texas Legislature Online.

Current Articles & Research Resources, August 1

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Explore interactive data related to the National Do Not Call Registry. (Federal Trade Commission, July 30, 2019)
  • See when the sales tax holiday for school supplies takes place. (Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, July 2019)
  • Examine the political geography of major metropolitan areas. (FiveThirtyEight, May 20, 2019)
  • Track U.S. government data breaches since 2014. (Comparitech, July 24, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Getting in range." By Jacob Fischler. CQ Weekly, July 8, 2019, pp. 31-33.
    Discusses impact of the Volkswagen emission test settlement on the electric vehicle charging infrastructure in the United States. Notes Texas plans to spend $31.4 million of the settlement, more than any other state, to expand the state's infrastructure and alleviate range anxiety.
  • "Garland is building its own workforce of the future." Dallas Business Journal, July 19, 2019, p. 6.
    Profiles Garland Independent School District's Gilbreath-Reed Career and Technical Center, a state-of-the-art facility that is developing a skilled workforce pipeline for businesses in Garland and surrounding areas. Includes interview with Paul Mayer, CEO of the Garland Chamber of Commerce.
  • "Innovation in insurance: Run for cover." Economist, July 20th-26th, 2019, pp. 59-60.
    Reports on the lack of innovation in the insurance industry, noting insurers' products and processes are losing touch with 21st-century life. Points out insurers' weaknesses and growing competition from reinsurers, digital entrepreneurs, and Big Tech (Amazon, Apple, and Google).
  • "Surveillance technology: Vision quest." Economist, July 13th-19th, 2019, p. 28.
    Highlights a recent hearing of the United States House Committee on Homeland Security that examined the federal government's use of facial recognition and biometric technologies, as well as the civil liberties implications of these technologies.
  • "Kicking back kicks in for rural counties: Texas state parks provide economic boost to local economies." By Ramona Reeves. Fiscal Notes, July 2019, pp. 1-4.
    Highlights the economic benefits of state parks for rural and less populated areas of Texas. Notes state parks accounted for $891 million in sales activities in 2018 and $240 million in economic impact on area resident incomes, according to a January 2019 report by Texas A&M University.
  • "Depth over breadth." By Daniel Kreisman and Kevin Stange. Internet Resource, Fall 2019, pp. 1-8.
    Analyzes results of a study conducted on the value of vocational education in high schools. Examines the relationship between vocational or career and technical coursework and high school graduates’ success in college or in the workforce. Discusses policy implications for high schools.
  • "Local Rep urges protest of TWIA rate hike." By Suzanne Freeman. Internet Resource, July 25, 2019, pp. 1-3.
    Reports that the Texas Windstorm Insurance Association [TWIA] may increase insurance rates at their August board meeting. Includes reactions from Representatives Todd Hunter and Mayes Middleton. Mentions SB615, 86th Legislature.
  • "Pharmacy benefit manager reform: Lessons from Ohio." By Trevor J. Royce, Sheetal Kircher, and Rena M. Conti. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), July 23/30, 2019, pp. 299-300.
    Describes Ohio's efforts to increase pharmacy benefit manager [PBM] accountability, promote more transparent pass-through pricing, and reduce the use of pharmacy gag clauses.
  • "States should reject corporate demands for "deferred tax" deductions." By Michael Mazerov. Journal of MultiState Taxation and Incentives, July 2019, pp. 22-29.
    Analyzes the arguments for providing corporations deferred tax deductions at the time of a state rate increase. Finds adverse effects on stockholders and stock prices implausible and recommends no additional states grant such deductions.
  • "Nexus news: Does due process provide any protection at all?" By June Summers Haas and Daniel L. Stanley. Journal of State Taxation, Summer 2019, pp. 9-12.
    Discusses the implications of two recently decided court cases related to protections provided by the Due Process Clause in the aftermath of South Dakota v. Wayfair. Summarizes Greenscapes Home and Garden Products v. Testa, in which a Georgia company has been required to pay Ohio's commercial-activity tax, and North Carolina Dep't of Revenue v. Kimberly Rice Kaestner 1992 Family Trust, concerning the efforts of North Carolina to tax the trust income of a resident.
  • "Are fiscal rules an effective restraint on government debt?" By Veronique de Rugy and Jack Salmon. Policy Brief (Mercatus Center, George Mason University), July 16, 2019, pp. 1-15.
    Assesses the underlying problems with the United States' budgetary process and explores the effectiveness of fiscal rules in restraining government spending growth. Presents examples of countries that have proven effective at controlling spending.
  • "Fortnightly Smartest Communities 2019: Austin, Columbus, San Antonio, Spokane, suburban Birmingham." Public Utilities Fortnightly, July 2019, pp. 22-57 (Note Length).
    Highlights achievements of the winners of Fortnightly Smartest Communities 2019, including Austin and San Antonio.
  • "Driven to distraction." By Ann Kitch. State Legislatures, July/August 2019, pp. 32-33.
    Reports 2019 has been an active year for state legislation relating to distracted driving. Points out the challenges of enforcing and assessing the effectiveness of handheld phone bans.
  • "Real estate wins at the Texas Capitol." By Jaime Lee. Texas Realtor, July 2019, pp. 18-22.
    Highlights legislation of interest to the Texas real estate industry that was enacted by the 86th Legislature. Presents the 86th Texas Legislature Hall of Fame, recognizing legislators who championed pro-consumer and private property rights legislation.
  • "Keeping house." By Ali Anari. Tierra Grande, July 2019, pp. 6-9.
    Discusses the effect of location on homeownership affordability in the United States and Texas. Ranks homeownership affordability by state and by Texas cities. Notes that the affordability gap between Texas and the nation has narrowed since the Great Recession.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Resource Highlight: Spotlight on the 86th Legislature

Now that session is over, do you need to find statistics on bills passed, dates that bills take effect, constitutional amendments up for election, and more? Use the links below to find information for the 86th Legislature:

New & Noteworthy Books and Reports: July 2019

The Library is continually adding new books to its collection. Below are the seven titles from our July 2019 New & Noteworthy list

Check out and delivery of New & Noteworthy titles is available to legislative staff in Capitol and District offices. To arrange check out and delivery of any of these items, you can submit an online request through the New & Noteworthy page on our website, contact the library at 512-463-1252, or use our PDF request form.

 

1. How We Did It .... 2016-2019
By Joe K. Longley
Documents Joe K. Longley's service as president of the State Bar of Texas, 2017-2018, and his successful efforts to improve the State Bar, illustrated by campaign materials, election results, interviews, and president's columns. Details Longley's contributions to the Texas Legislature, including his involvement in drafting significant legislation relating to the Insurance, Finance, and Property Codes and as the principal drafter of the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices and Consumer Protection Act (DTPA), which is documented in the Joe K. Longley-Philip K. Maxwell Deceptive Trade Practices Act Collection: Legislative Archive 1973-2001 and the Mark L. Kincaid Papers, 1995-2015 at the Legislative Reference Library of Texas.
Joe K. Longley, 2019. 65 pages.
Online at: https://lrl.texas.gov/scanned/SIRSI/B600.8_L862_2019.pdf
B600.8 L862 2019


 

 

2. In the Weeds: Demonization, Legalization, and the Evolution of U.S. Marijuana Policy
By Clayton J. Mosher and Scott Akins
Explores the path marijuana has taken on its road to legalization. Addresses the exaggerated arguments and critiques against legalized cannabis. Examines the current and possible future policies on marijuana as both a recreational and medicinal drug.
Temple University Press, 2019. 294 pages.
345.73 M853IN 2019


 

 

3. Speech Police: The Global Struggle to Govern the Internet
By David Kaye
Examines how dominant American companies Facebook, Google, YouTube, and Twitter moderate content on their digital platforms. Considers who should be in charge of making the rules and policing online speech – whether governments should regulate the internet or let the market self-regulate. Offers recommendations to help governments and companies ensure that online speech benefits from democratic accountability, promotes and protects freedom of expression, privacy of communications, rights of association and assembly, and other values of free societies.
Columbia Global Reports, 2019. 142 pages.
384.334 K182S 2019


 

 

4. Amazing Texas Girls: True Stories from Lone Star History
By Mary Dodson Wade
Provides biographical sketches on fifteen women who spent most or all of their childhoods in Texas, then went on to shape the state's history. Ranges from pre-statehood to the present day and represents women across cultural, economic, and educational backgrounds.
Lone Star Books, 2018. 247 pages.
YOUNGTEXANS2


 

 

5. Slavery and Freedom in Texas: Stories from the Courtroom, 1821-1871
By Jason A. Gillmer
Profiles five court cases related to slavery in 19th century Texas. Examines lawsuits involving restitution for the death of a slave by an overseer, a woman set free by her owner's will, attempts to free a woman who "passed" as white, the efforts of a family of free people of color to maintain their land, and the rights of heirs born to an enslaved woman. Details the lives of the individuals affected by each case within the context of Texas' unique history as a frontier slave state. Discusses differing attitudes toward the issues brought forward by the cases, including: interracial marriage, property rights, ownership rights, inheritance, manumission, and social class.
The University of Georgia Press, 2017. 245 pages.
342.764087 G416S 2017


 

 

6. Final Results of Sunset Reviews, 2018-2019
By Sunset Advisory Commission
Summarizes the actions taken by the 86th Legislature on the 32 entities that were under review by the Sunset Commission. Highlights major changes to the Texas Alcohol and Beverage Commission (TABC), Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS), and licensing and regulation. Provides the Sunset bill number, fiscal impact, and final action taken on each of the entities reviewed.
Sunset Advisory Commission, 2019. 66 pages.
Online at: https://lrl.texas.gov/scanned/SIRSI/Final%20Results%20of%20Sunset%20Reviews%202018-2019.pdf
S1500.8 AN79 2019


 

 

7. Biennial Report, Texas Ethics Commission, 2017-2018
By Texas Ethics Commission
Addresses Ethics Advisory Opinions issued, sworn complaints processed, civil penalties imposed, and statutory changes recommended in 2017-2018.
Texas Ethics Commission, 2018. 47 pages.
Online at: https://www.ethics.state.tx.us/data/legislation/reports/BiennialReport_FY17-18.pdf
E2500.3 B477 2017-2018

Current Articles & Research Resources, July 25

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Review the ballot language in the upcoming constitutional amendment election in November. (Texas Secretary of State, accessed July 24, 2019)
  • Explore how demand response works to meet energy needs of consumers. (National Conference of State Legislatures, July 2019)
  • Consider how third-party debt collections affect consumers' credit. (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, July 2019)
  • Examine the circumstances under which a debtor may discharge a student loan under federal bankruptcy laws. (Congressional Research Service, July 18, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Measles as metaphor." By Peter Beinart. Atlantic Monthly, August 2019, pp. 13-16.
    Suggests declining vaccination rates reflect a population that lacks awareness of lessons of the past, has overconfidence in its own "amateur knowledge," and shows little trust in government and other institutions. Offers solutions to reverse the trend.
  • "Suburb weighs how to slow apartment construction." By Daniel Salazar. Austin Business Journal, July 19, 2019, p. 8.
    Reports that Leander City Council's proposal to restrict the use of certain building materials on new multifamily projects could violate HB2439, 86th Legislature, relating to overly restrictive building regulations.
  • "How Texas flushed out plumbers." By David Wethe. Bloomberg Businessweek, July 15, 2019, pp. 37-39.
    Discusses Governor Greg Abbott's emergency executive order relating to continuing the Texas State Board of Plumbing Examiners. Explains how the agency's Sunset legislation, SB621, failed to pass the 86th Legislature.
  • "Trying to change Congress, starting with the lowest rung: Interns." By Jessica Mendoza. Christian Science Monitor, July 22, 2019, pp. 6-7.
    Highlights the College to Congress program, a nonprofit that helps low-income students obtain internships in Congress. Explains the program seeks bipartisan participation.
  • "Way ahead of you, Congress." By Jacob Fischler. CQ Weekly, July 15, 2019, pp. 31-33.
    Looks at what state legislatures are doing to address climate change. Focuses on states led by Democrats who campaigned on climate policy in the 2018 elections.
  • "The world economy: A strangely elastic expansion." Economist, July 13th-19th, 2019, pp. 21-23.
    Comments on America's economic expansion, which at the end of July will have matched the record for the longest unbroken period of rising GDP set in the 1990s. Considers factors that could trigger a recession.
  • "The U.S. Supreme Court and schools: 2018-19." By Mark Walsh. Education Week, July 17, 2019, pp. 19-20.
    Summarizes recent United States Supreme Court rulings relevant to K-12 education, including the census citizenship question, age discrimination, religion in a public square, and federal administrative power. Identifies several high profile education-related cases that will be heard during the Court's 2020 term.
  • "State efforts to lower health care prices paid by private insurers." By Aditi P. Sen, Amber Willink, and Gerard F. Anderson. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), July 16, 2019, pp. 201-202.
    Outlines three approaches states are taking to lower health care prices paid by private insurers: targeted price regulation, promoting competition, and investing in alternative payment models.
  • "Energy efficiency in cannabis cultivation: A growing concern." By John Hargrove. Public Utilities Fortnightly, July 2019, pp. 147, 149.
    Features a brief discussion about the energy-related challenges of harvesting cannabis.
  • "Voting by phone is easy. But is it secure?" By Matt Vasilogambros. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), July 18, 2019, pp. 1-6.
    Discusses the conflict between accessibility and security in phone-based voting systems.
  • "Forgotten in the fields." By Dana Ullman. Texas Observer, July/August 2019, pp. 20-25.
    Describes forced agricultural labor of farmworkers in Texas, who increasingly come to the state on H-2A guest worker visas, and the difficulty in prosecuting labor trafficking cases. Cites a 2016 study by The University of Texas at Austin, which estimated there are 234,000 labor trafficking victims in Texas with $600 million in annual wages stolen.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Current Articles & Research Resources, July 18

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Review remote sales tax collection by state. (National Conference of State Legislatures, July 1, 2019)
  • See how probation and parole affect prison populations. (Council of State Governments, ©2019)
  • Consider how a change in the federal minimum wage would affect employment. (Congressional Budget Office, July 8, 2019)
  • Read about possible reforms to federal asylum laws. (Texas Public Policy Foundation, July 10, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Education isn't enough." By Nick Hanauer. Atlantic Monthly, July 2019, pp. 19-22.
    Argues educational inequality is a symptom of the real problem, which is economic inequality. Suggests the most important predictor of a child's educational success is household income and a secure middle-class life.
  • "More states take a gamble on sports betting. Will it pay off?" By Jacob Turcotte. Christian Science Monitor, June 24, 2019, p. 15.
    Identifies the status of sports gambling in the various states and defines the pros and cons of sports gambling expansion.
  • "Americans United endorses bill to end discrimination in foster care programs." Church & State, July/August 2019, pp. 16-17.
    Highlights the Every Child Deserves a Family Act, proposed federal legislation that seeks to end discrimination in foster care, adoption, and child welfare.
  • "Police officers and social media: Slur and protect." Economist, July 6th-12th, 2019, pp. 22, 24.
    Considers how law enforcement agencies should discipline police and border patrol officers who make racist and misogynistic posts on their social media accounts. Questions whether the posts are protected speech.
  • "State legislators tackle broad basket of issues on parents' checklist." By Marva Hinton. Education Week, June 19, 2019, pp. 15, 17.
    Looks at recent state legislation on school safety, charter schools, and student data privacy. Mentions HB1387, 86th Legislature, that removes caps on the number of school marshals per school campus.
  • "Equity crowdfunding in Texas: A funding tool for small business." By Jackie Benton. Fiscal Notes, June/July 2019, pp. 7-10.
    Examines state equity crowdfunding rules and requirements in Texas and the benefits for small businesses. Notes the Texas crowdfunding program has raised $2.5 million in capital for small businesses since 2015.
  • "Abbott signs bill to combat patient confusion." By Elizabeth Byrne. Fort Worth Business Press, June 24-30, 2019, pp. 18-19.
    Discusses HB2041, 86th Legislature, that requires freestanding emergency rooms to disclose the in-network health insurance plans they accept and fees that may be charged. Quotes bill author Representative Tom Oliverson.
  • "Lancaster library to be named for educator Reby Cary." By Rick Mauch. Fort Worth Business Press, July 1-7, 2019, p. 10.
    Reports that Fort Worth's first children- and teen-focused public library will be named the Reby Cary Youth Library, honoring the late educator and former state representative.
  • "The 86th Texas Legislature gavels out: Texas hospitals achieve notable policy wins to protect access to care." By Aisha Ainsworth. Internet Resource, May/June 2019, pp. 1-2.
    Recaps the 86th Texas Legislature, emphasizing bills that affect Texas hospitals.
  • "Protecting the accuracy of the 2020 census." By Constance F. Citro. Issues in Science and Technology, Summer 2019, pp. 37-43.
    Provides a brief history of early population census taking in the United States and lists key issues with the modern census from 1970 through 2010. Discusses the challenges to conducting an accurate census in 2020, including an undercount due to government mistrust, computing systems vulnerabilities, funding shortfalls, and data protection.
  • "Texas law and the restatement of the law of liability insurance: An initial comparison of blackletter principles." By Cyrus W. Haralson and Christina A. Culver. Journal of Texas Insurance Law, Spring 2019, pp. 3-29 (Note Length).
    Compares and contrasts Texas law on liability insurance with the recent final draft of the American Law Institute's Restatement of the Law of Liability Insurance.
  • "Criminal justice reform is having a (long overdue) moment." By C.J. Ciaramella. Reason, August/September 2019, pp. 26-29.
    Reviews a variety of federal, state, and local bipartisan efforts to reform the criminal justice system.
  • "Recalibrating local politics to increase the supply of housing; Comment." By Chris Elmendorf and William A. Fischel. Regulation (CATO Institute), Summer 2019, pp. 38-45.
    Argues state planning mandates and development-rights auctions can bolster pro-housing factions in local governments.
  • "Businesses scramble to prep for city's sick leave law." By Tony Quesada. San Antonio Business Journal, July 5, 2019, p. 3.
    Comments on the San Antonio city ordinance that will require employers to allow employees to accrue sick leave beginning August 1, 2019.
  • "Texas facing historically tight labor markets, constraining growth." By Christopher Slijk. Southwest Economy (Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas), Second Quarter 2018, pp. 3-6.
    Analyzes recent trends in labor force migration and unemployment that have led to a tight labor market, constraining economic growth and limiting business expansion.
  • "New attack on race-based admissions at UT Austin seeks to succeed where 'Fisher' failed." By Angela Morris. Texas Lawyer, July/August 2019, p. 4.
    Discusses the new legal strategy at play in a new lawsuit challenging the University of Texas at Austin's race-based admission policies.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Bill Effective Dates, 86th Legislature

The Library has created its bill effective dates page for the 86th Legislature. Legislators passed 474 bills that are now in effect. (473 bills and provisions within 15 bills took effect immediately; one bill took effect on June 4.)

 

The remainder of the 1,373 total bills signed by the governor or filed without the governor's signature will take effect over the next five years, between August 26, 2019, and January 1, 2024. Peruse our page to find detailed information about what takes effect when.

 

To keep up with new laws throughout the year, check the Library's list of bill effective dates.

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