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Current Articles & Research Resources, October 17

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Read about rural population growth in recent years. (National Conference of State Legislatures, September 2019)
  • Consider the impact of electric scooters. (Council of State Governments, September 2019)
  • Explore how Texas' economy compares with other states. (Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, accessed October 16, 2019)
  • Get current information about the upcoming elections. (Texas Secretary of State, accessed October 16, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Fort Worth asks: Can a Klan hall become a place of healing?" By Henry Gass. Christian Science Monitor, September 30, 2019, pp. 8-9.
    Highlights the move to transform a former Fort Worth Ku Klux Klan hall into a shared community space focusing on dialogue and equity, while also promoting a better understanding of racist events in the city's history.
  • "Laboring against discrimination." By Samantha Sokol. Church & State, October 2019, pp. 4-5.
    Highlights the United States Department of Labor's proposed rule that would expand a religious exemption available to taxpayer-funded federal contractors. Surmises the rule would allow religiously-affiliated contractors to claim a religious right when they refuse to hire or fire certain people.
  • "Borderline despair: How the U.S. is warehousing asylum-seekers." By Camila DeChalus. CQ Weekly, September 30, 2019, pp. 14-19.
    Examines the impact the Migration Protection Protocols [MPP] policy, also known as the Remain in Mexico program, is having on those who are seeking asylum in the United States. Argues these new restrictions on asylum are discouraging migrants from entering the United States legally.
  • "Texas: The magenta mammoth." Economist, October 5th-11th, 2019, pp. 21-22.
    Considers the prospects of Democrats winning Texas in the 2020 elections.
  • "High court case tests faith-based use of tax credits." By Mark Walsh. Education Week, October 2, 2019, pp. 1, 10-11.
    Provides background information on the upcoming United States Supreme Court case Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, which addresses whether groups can receive state tax credits for private school scholarship donations. Suggests the high court's ruling could be significant for K-12 education and potentially affect state constitutional provisions in 37 states.
  • "The law and ethics of fetal burial requirements for reproductive health care." By Dov Fox, I. Glenn Cohen, and Eli Y. Adashi. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), October 8, 2019, pp. 1347-1348.
    Considers the legal and ethical ramifications of recent and historical fetal burial requirement cases that have been heard by the United States Supreme Court, with Box v. Planned Parenthood being the most recent.
  • "Patterns of telehealth use among rural Medicaid beneficiaries." By Jean A. Talbot, et al. Journal of Rural Health, Summer 2019, pp. 298-307.
    Provides information about telehealth use in 2011, including the prevalence of telehealth use among rural and urban Medicaid beneficiaries, characteristics of telehealth users, reimbursement policies, and unique rural service needs.
  • "The danger of being 'endangered.'" By Shawn Regan. National Review, September 30, 2019, pp. 21-23.
    Considers new revisions to the Endangered Species Act regulations, including the restoration of a regulatory distinction between threatened and endangered species. Suggests the new rules will encourage states, landowners, and conservationists to collaborate better on recovery efforts for threatened species.
  • "The right to make arms." By Kevin D. Williamson. National Review, September 30, 2019, pp. 41-43.
    Discusses the Remington Arms Co. v. Soto case, currently before the United States Supreme Court, and the question of whether the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act [PLCAA] exception would stop Connecticut families in their attempt to sue Remington for its Bushmaster rifle advertising.
  • "The challenges of economic growth." By M. Ray Perryman. Perryman Report and Texas Letter, Vol. 36, No. 6, pp. 1-3, 6.
    Quantifies the importance of proactive actions to address challenges associated with the demands of rapid expansion in an area's population and economy. Uses the unprecedented growth in Midland, Texas as a case study.
  • "How one school is tackling the youth vaping epidemic." By Christine Vestal. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), September 23, 2019, pp. 1-9.
    Reports school administrators are using a combination of strategies to reduce student vaping at South Portland High School in Maine: limiting suspensions, giving students behavioral health assessments, providing alternative ways to socialize, and offering mental health and addiction counseling.
  • "An abridged guide to the 86th Texas Legislature for county clerks." By Teresa Keil. Texas County Progress, October 2019, pp. 34, 38, 55.
    Lists a dozen bills passed during the 86th Texas Legislature that affect county clerks and how they perform their duties.
  • "Moving on." By Amy Lynn Sorrel. Texas Medicine, October 2019, p. 48.
    Profiles Representative John Zerwas, MD, highlighting his significant legislation relating to medicine and noting his new role as the University of Texas System's executive vice chancellor for health affairs.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Interim Hearings – Week of October 21

Today's Committee Meetings on the LRL website is a calendar of interim committee hearings with links to agendas. Below are resources related to upcoming Interim Hearings.

 

October 21

Senate Select Committee on Mass Violence Prevention & Community Safety (El Paso)

Charge: Learn firsthand, the personal, family, and community impact of mass shootings in Texas by hearing from victims of mass violence in Dallas, Santa Fe, Sutherland Springs, El Paso, and Midland/Odessa. Conduct hearings in Austin, El Paso, and the Midland/Odessa area to meet with victims and their families in those communities.

October 22

House Committee on Redistricting (Lone Star College-North Harris, Houston)

Topic: 2021 legislative redistricting process and 2020 Census data

 

October 23

House Committee on Redistricting (Texas Southern University, Houston)

Topic: 2021 legislative redistricting process and 2020 Census data

Legislative Families: Siblings

The Texas Legislature has seen many siblings who have legislative service in common. As of 2019, there have been 46 sibling sets!* Read on for a list of brothers and sisters who have shared time in the Capitol (along with some interesting details about a few of these family units).

 

Ten sets of siblings have had overlap in their years of service (though not necessarily in the same chamber): 

  • Dennis Bonnen and Greg Bonnen

    • Dennis serves in the House, 1997–present (75th–86th)
    • Greg serves in the House, 2013–present (83rd–86th)
  • William H. Bourland and James G. Bourland
    • William served in the House, 1846–1849 (1st–2nd), and 1853–1855 (5th)
    • James served in the Senate, 1846–1849 (1st–2nd)
  • James Washington Guinn and Robert Guinn
    • Robert served in the Senate, 1853–1870 (5th–11th)
    • James served in the House, 1863–1866 (10th–11th)
  • Ross Hardin and Doss Hardin The first and only twins to serve in the Texas Legislature. Read a speech given by Doss Hardin at Baylor University's 1939 "Convention of Twins" that was read into the Senate Journal record.
    • Ross served in the House, 1935–1941 (44th–46th)
    • Doss served in the Senate, 1938–1940 (45th–46th)
  • Jim Keffer and Bill Keffer
    • Jim served in the House, 1997–2017 (75th–84th)
    • Bill served in the House, 2003–2007 (78th–79th)
  • William Henry Pope and Alexander Pope In an act of brotherly devotion, Alexander died when shot by W.T.S. Keller "while endeavoring to prevent him from shooting his brother, W.H. Pope" during a child custody trial. William was shot but survived the assault.
    • William served in the Senate, 1883–1893 (18th–22nd)
    • Alexander served in the House, 1887–1889 (20th–21st)
  • Joseph Draper Sayers and William Sayers
    • Joseph served in the Senate, 1873–1874 (13th)
    • William served in the House, 1873–1876 (13th–14th)
  • Henry Berryman Terrell and George Butler Terrell The Terrells appear to be the first brothers to serve at the same time, in the same chamber.
    • H.B. served in the House, 1901–1909 (27th–30th), and in the Senate, 1909–1915 (31st–34th)
    • George served in the House, 1899–1903 (26th–27th), 1907–1913 (30th–32nd), 1917–1920 (35th–36th), and 1931–1933 (42nd)
  • Carlos Uresti and Tomas Uresti
    • Carlos served in the House, 1997–2006 (75th–79th), and in the Senate, 2006–2018 (79th–85th)
    • Tomas served in the House, 2017–2019 (85th)
  • Phillip L. Willis and Doyle Willis The Willis brothers are noted as the first siblings to serve two consecutive terms together in the Texas House of Representatives (HR 95, 74R).
    • Phillip served in in the House, 1947–1949 (50th–51st)
    • Doyle served in the House, 1947–1953 (50th–52nd), 1969–1971 (61st), and 1973–1997 (63rd–74th), and in the Senate, 1953–1963 (53rd–57th) 

No siblings have served at the same time in the Senate, according to our research.

 

Other siblings served in the Legislature at different times:

*This blog post is the second in a series, with a previous post on legislative spouses, and posts to come on legislative parents/children, and other family connections. We've attempted to identify all of the legislative siblings, but let us know if you think we missed some! This information is provided as a public service by the Legislative Reference Library. The Legislative Reference Library makes no representation as to its completeness or accuracy and makes no warranty in regard to its use. Users assume all risk of reliance on the information included on this site.

 

Current Articles & Research Resources, October 10

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Review the legal authority  behind appropriating money for border wall construction. (Congressional Research Service, October 2, 2019)
  • Consider strategies to stop or slow the spread of the flu. (National Conference of State Legislatures, October 2019)
  • Read about whether sin taxes  are a reliable source of state revenue. (Tax Policy Center, October 2019)
  • Explore how cable companies use hidden fees  to increase consumers' cable bills. (Consumer Reports, October 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Alarms sound on air rescues." By Mary Ellen McIntire. CQ Weekly, September 23, 2019, pp. 24-26.
    Details challenges faced by Congress and the states in their efforts to protect consumers from balance billing, a practice that can result in unexpected and exorbitant bills for air ambulance services.
  • "Electronic monitoring: Pricey tags." Economist, September 28th-October 4th, 2019, pp. 24, 26.
    Suggests the high fees and burdensome conditions associated with electronic monitoring are comparable to the type of injustices imposed by cash bail. Notes monitoring stigmatizes people who have not been convicted of a crime and drives them into debt.
  • "Taxing out-of-state sellers: New state tax laws may bring in $500 million annually." By Shannon Halbrook. Fiscal Notes, September 2019, pp. 6-9.
    Discusses state tax policy on Internet sales tax revenue after South Dakota v. Wayfair and changes in Texas law and regulations, including an amended Comptroller's rule, and HB1525 and HB2153, 86th Legislature.
  • "You down with CBD? Yea you know me  states look to incentivize and tax growing hemp industry." By Daniel G. Mudd. Journal of MultiState Taxation and Incentives, October 2019, pp. 32-34.
    Chronicles the development of the hemp industry and growth of hemp-based products such as the popular cannabidiol [CBD]. Highlights state incentive programs for hemp cultivation in Kentucky and Colorado, and state taxation of hemp in Vermont, Louisiana, and Montanna.
  • "States are depriving innocent people of their Second Amendment rights."  By Jacob Sullum, Reason, November 2019, pp. 46-51.
    Considers red flag laws used to obtain extreme risk orders to seize firearms. Reviews the history of enactment of these laws and explains problems with their application. Offers suggestions for improving the laws and due process protections.
  • "Texas' energy base drives climate concerns as renewables expand." By Jesse Thompson and Emma Marshall. Southwest Economy (Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas), Third Quarter 2019, pp. 9-13.
    Reports the state's high industrial share of carbon emissions and its leadership role in renewable energy will place Texas in the center of the debate about climate change and the reduction of greenhouse gases.
  • "Education: Learning from the best."  By Michelle Exstrom. State Legislatures, September/October 2019, pp. 12-16.
    Discusses four common elements of world-class educational systems. Considers how states can apply lessons learned from studying high-performing education systems to improve student achievement and prepare higher-skilled workers. (Report at http://www.ncsl.org/documents/educ/Edu_International_FinaI_V2.pdf)
  • "Climate change could make borrowing costlier for states and cities." By Alex Brown.  Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), October 1, 2019, pp. 1-7.
    Considers how the bond sectors' increasing attention to climate risk issues will affect the municipal bond market. Mentions Port Arthur, Texas, experienced credit downgrades after major hurricanes.
  • "Q&A with Ernesto Ballesteros: Person taked with overseeing cybersecurity matters for Texas provides a glimpse of goals, initiatives and priorities." Texas Banking, October 2019, pp. 14-16.
    Interviews Ernesto Ballesteros, state cybersecurity coordinator and chairman of the Texas Cybersecurity Council, about cybersecurity matters generally, recent ransomware attacks in rural Texas communities, and cybersecurity awareness for the Texas banking industry. Discusses the composition and charge of the Texas Cybersecurity Council, established in 2013 (SB1102, 83rd Legislature, R.S.) and expanded in 2017 (HB8, 85th Legislature, R.S.).
  • "Battling over the past." By Christopher Hooks. Texas Monthly, October 2019, pp. 82-85, 154-158.
    Contrasts recent trends in Texas history to correct the historical record and be more inclusive with efforts to maintain traditional accounts. Discusses legislation to replace Confederate Heroes Day with Civil War Remembrance Day (HB1242, 84th Legislature) and to restrict the removal or alteration of certain monuments from public property (SB1663, 86th Legislature). Mentions Senator Brandon Creighton..

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

 

Interim Hearings – Week of October 14

Today's Committee Meetings on the LRL website is a calendar of interim committee hearings with links to agendas. Below are resources related to upcoming Interim Hearings.

 

October 17

Senate Select Committee on Mass Violence Prevention & Community Safety (Odessa)

Charge: Learn firsthand, the personal, family, and community impact of mass shootings in Texas by hearing from victims of mass violence in Dallas, Santa Fe, Sutherland Springs, El Paso, and Midland/Odessa. Conduct hearings in Austin, El Paso, and the Midland/Odessa area to meet with victims and their families in those communities.

Constitutional Amendment Election, November 2019

On November 5, 2019, voters will have a chance to consider ten constitutional amendments proposed by the 86th Legislature. The proposed amendments cover a wide range of topics, including taxation, funding for various state agencies, a flood infrastructure fund, and more.

 

For background and analysis of the ballot propositions, see the House Research Organization's Constitutional Amendments Proposed for November 2019 Ballot, and the Texas Legislative Council's Analyses of Proposed Constitutional Amendments.

 

The Texas Constitution is one of the longest in the nation, at an estimated 86,936 words (The Book of the States, vol. 49). The Constitution is changed through amendments, which are proposed by the Texas Legislature and accepted or rejected by the voters. Since the current Texas Constitution was adopted in 1876, 498 amendments have been passed.  

 

Amendments Proposed for the November 5, 2019 ballot by the 86th Legislature

HJR 72 Prop. 1 The constitutional amendment permitting a person to hold more than one office as a municipal judge at the same time.  
SJR 79 Prop. 2 The constitutional amendment providing for the issuance of additional general obligation bonds by the Texas Water Development Board in an amount not to exceed $200 million to provide financial assistance for the development of certain projects in economically distressed areas.  
HJR 34 Prop. 3 The constitutional amendment authorizing the legislature to provide for a temporary exemption from ad valorem taxation of a portion of the appraised value of certain property damaged by a disaster.  
HJR 38 Prop. 4 The constitutional amendment prohibiting the imposition of an individual income tax, including a tax on an individual’s share of partnership and unincorporated association income.  
SJR 24 Prop. 5 The constitutional amendment dedicating the revenue received from the existing state sales and use taxes that are imposed on sporting goods to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Historical Commission to protect Texas’ natural areas, water quality, and history by acquiring, managing,and improving state and local parks and historic sites while not increasing the rate of the state sales and use taxes.  
HJR 12 Prop. 6 The constitutional amendment authorizing the legislature to increase by $3 billion the maximum bond amount authorized for the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.  
HJR 151 Prop. 7 The constitutional amendment allowing increase distributions to the available school fund.  
HJR 4 Prop. 8 The constitutional amendment providing for the creation of the flood infrastructure fund to assist in the financing of drainage, flood mitigation, and flood control projects.  
HJR 95 Prop. 9 The constitutional amendment authorizing the legislature to exempt from ad valorem taxation precious metal held in a precious metal depository located in this state.  
SJR 32 Prop. 10 The constitutional amendment to allow the transfer of a law enforcement animal to a qualified caretaker in certain circumstances.  

Current Articles & Research Resources, October 3

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Track traffic safety laws state by state. (National Conference of State Legislatures, September 18, 2019)
  • Compare prescription drug prices in the U.S. to prescription drug prices in other countries. (U.S. House Ways & Means Committee, September 2019)
  • Read about federal funding designated for reimbursing Texas health care providers for charity care. (Texas Health and Human Services Commission, October 1, 2019)
  • Explore free access to case law. (Harvard Law School, ©2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "New federal loan-forgiveness program still rejects 99% of applicants." By Michael Vasquez. Chronicle of Higher Education, September 20, 2019, p. A21.
    Highlights problems with the United States Department of Education's college loan forgiveness program for individuals going into public service.
  • "Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac: Home truths." Economist, September 14th-20th, 2019, pp. 67-68.
    Discusses United States Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin's plan to reform the federal housing finance system.
  • "Fiscal highlights from the 86th Legislature: Legislative session tackled public education, property taxes." By Ramona Reeves. Fiscal Notes, September 2019, pp. 1, 3-5.
    Provides an overview of the 2020-2021 state budget and details legislation passed by the 86th Legislature on school finance (HB3), local property taxes (SB2), teacher retirement (SB500 and SB12), online sales taxes (HB1525 and HB2153), and investment of the Rainy Day Fund into the Legacy Fund (SB69).
  • "The 'green rush,' CBD businesses flourishing under new law." By Neetish Basnet. Fort Worth Business Press, September 16-22, 2019, pp. 26-27.
    Discusses the new industrial hemp law and its impact on businesses in Texas. Quotes Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller.
  • "Serving rural America: Health insurance providers at work." Internet Resource, September 2019, pp. 1-6.
    Presents five case studies featuring health insurance providers' various approaches to delivering quality health care in rural America, while addressing the problem of rural hospital closings and mergers.
  • "Toolkit: State strategies to support older adults aging in place in rural areas." By Neva Kaye and Kristina Long. Internet Resource, September 2019, pp. 1-23.
    Provides examples of strategies states are using to support aging in place for older adults in rural areas. Highlights SB670, 86th Legislature, and SB1107, 85th Legislature, R.S., as examples of legislation removing the barriers to the use of telehealth and telemedicine.
  • "Federalism as an antidote to polarization over health care policy." By Stuart M. Butler. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), September 24, 2019, pp. 1131-1132.
    Recounts how federalism historically has helped to resolve policy impasses by allowing states to opt in — or out — with regard to disputed programs such as welfare, Medicaid, and the Affordable Care Act.
  • "Understanding Wayfair: A user-friendly guide to the biggest state tax case in 30 years." By Rick Najjar and Ted Kontopoulos. Journal of MultiState Taxation and Incentives, October 2019, pp. 6-17.
    Discusses the fundamental concepts and state tax ramifications of South Dakota v. Wayfair, in which the United States Supreme Court held that physical presence is no longer required for sales tax collection on remote or online sellers. Addresses textualism versus intentionalism in enactment of state tax statutes, substantial nexus, and the greater importance of due process.
  • "The new trustbusters are coming for big tech." By Thomas Hazlett. Reason, October 2019, pp. 20-27.
    Considers the economic school of thought known as "new structuralism," or "hipster antitrust," which advocates for regulation and antitrust action. Argues "nondiscrimination" regulations aimed at providing equal access favor legacy technologies at the expense of startups and innovation and do not protect consumers as intended.
  • "The potential pitfalls of combating surprise billing; Comment." By Ike Brannon, David A. Hyman, Benedic Ippolito, and David Kemp. Regulation (CATO Institute), Fall 2019, pp. 40-47.
    Discusses three plans Congress is considering to address surprise medical billing: benchmarking payments, mandated in-network guarantee, and independent dispute resolution [IDR]. Suggests IDR is the best mechanism to limit surprise bills, while commentators believe a contract-based approach would outperform IDR.
  • "Texas K-12 education spending set to rise, but who will pay?" By Jason Saving. Southwest Economy (Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas), Third Quarter 2019, pp. 17-21.
    Comments on the education reform package passed by the 86th Legislature (HB3SB2). Examines why the latest school finance fix may not fully provide a long-term solution to meeting local school districts' needs.
  • "School finance: Moving mountains." By Daniel Thatcher. State Legislatures, September/October 2019, pp. 17-19.
    Draws lessons from the experiences of states that successfully updated or replaced their school funding formulas.
  • "Bridge to nowhere." By Gus Bova. Texas Observer, September-October 2019, pp. 26-31.
    Investigates three companies' plans to build liquefied natural gas [LNG] facilities in South Texas and the local communities' opposition to them. Argues the proposed construction site for the Rio Grande Valley LNG plants will result in the destruction of fragile ecosystems and will pose health and safety risks for nearby residents. Mentions Senator Eddie Lucio and Representative Alex Dominguez.
  • "Inside the dangerous rise of JUUL." By Jamie Ducharme. Time, September 30, 2019, pp. 40-47.
    Profiles e-cigarette maker Juul, a mostly unregulated company that has been linked to the sharp rise in teenage and young adult vaping and nicotine addiction.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Interim Hearings – Week of October 7

Today's Committee Meetings on the LRL website is a calendar of interim committee hearings with links to agendas. Below are resources related to upcoming Interim Hearings.

 

October 9

House Committee on Redistricting (Fort Worth) 

Topic: 2021 legislative redistricting process and 2020 Census data

 

October 10

House Select Committee on Mass Violence Prevention & Community Safety (Farmers Branch) 

Duties:

(1) Examine options for strengthening enforcement measures for current laws that prevent the transfer of firearms to felons and other persons prohibited by current law from possessing firearms

(2) Examine impediments and challenges to the timely reporting of relevant criminal history information and other threat indicators to state and federal databases

(3) Examine the role of digital media and technology in threat detection, assessment, reporting, and prevention, including the collaboration between digital media and law enforcement

(4) Evaluate the ongoing and long-term workforce needs of the state related to cybersecurity, mental health, law enforcement, and related professionals

(5) Evaluate current protocols and extreme risk indicators used to identify potential threats and consider options for improving the dissemination of information between federal, state, and local entities and timely and appropriate intervention of mental health professionals

 

House Committee on Redistricting (Dallas) 

Topic: 2021 legislative redistricting process and 2020 Census data

Sunset Commission Self-Evaluation Reports, 2020-2021 Cycle

Self-evaluation reports for the 2020-2021 review cycle are now available on the Sunset Advisory Commission's website.

 

To better understand how the Sunset process works in Texas, see this diagram. The Sunset Commission’s last report of the 2018-2019 cycle, Final Results of Sunset Reviews, was published in June 2019. A comprehensive listing of all of the entities reviewed by the Sunset Commission is available here.

 

 

Cover image by Flickr user Nathan Eaton Jr.

 

Current Articles & Research Resources, September 26

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Explore statistics and data about the U.S. Hispanic population. (Pew Research Center, September 16, 2019)
  • See which states incorporate citizen input into the redistricting process. (National Conference of State Legislatures, September 2019)
  • Consider the FDA's role in regulating e-cigarettes. (Health Affairs Blog, September 17, 2019)
  • Check to see whether a motor carrier business is properly licensed in Texas. (Texas Department of Motor Vehicles, ©2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "When Medicaid takes everything you own." By Rachel Corbett. Atlantic Monthly, October 2019, pp. 72-79.
    Examines the Medicaid Estate Recovery Program, which allows states to seek repayment for Medicaid debt by seizing assets, including houses from the estates of Medicaid recipients. Argues this program strips property from people who can least afford the loss, thereby pushing displaced families back into the welfare system.
  • "Why insurtech startups are flourishing." By Will Anderson. Austin Business Journal, September 13, 2019, p. 22.
    Profiles insurtech companies relocating to Austin, companies that construct technology platforms aiming to lower health insurance costs while decreasing risks for self-employed freelance workers and small businesses.
  • "Drug shortages." Economist, September 14th-20th, 2019, pp. 57-58.
    Examines the causes and consequences of an increasing worldwide shortage of medicines and medical supplies.
  • "Are schools required to be trauma-sensitive?" By Sarah D. Sparks. Education Week, September 4, 2019, pp. 1, 18-19.
    Discusses three active lawsuits that challenge how public schools are addressing student disabilities resulting from trauma.
  • "Quality counts 2019: Educational opportunities and performance in Texas." Education Week, September 4, 2019, pp. 1-7.
    Assesses the educational opportunities and performance of Texas and compares them with the national average. Grades and ranks Texas in three categories: chance for success, school finance, and K-12 achievement.
  • "Post-Harvey auto sales back on track: Texans are on the road again." By Jackie Benton. Fiscal Notes, September 2019, pp. 1-2.
    Discusses the effect of Hurricane Harvey on automobile sales. Charts Texas motor vehicle sales tax collections from fiscal years 2015-2018.
  • "The dynamics of Medicaid enrollment, employment, and beneficiary health status." By Jessica P. Vistnes and Steven C. Hill. Health Affairs, September 2019, pp. 1491-1495.
    Notes that 13.9 percent of new, nonelderly adult Medicaid beneficiaries in 2015-2016 had experienced a decline in health before enrollment, and 14.1 percent had jobs that ended before they enrolled. Advises careful design of Medicaid work requirement policies that consider exemptions, reasonable accommodations, and gaps in employment.
  • "How states can improve America’s immigration system." By John Hudak and Christine Stenglein. Internet Resource, September 10, 2019, pp. 1-14.
    Outlines the role states can play in reforming immigration policy. Includes discussion of immigration detention facilities in Texas.
  • "Should failing schools be closed? What the research says." By Marcus A. Winters. Issue Brief (Manhattan Institute), September 17, 2019, pp. 1-10.
    Relies on available research to argue that it is better for school systems to close persistently ineffective schools that do not show improvement after receiving additional resources and interventions.
  • "Prescriptions on demand: The growth of direct-to-consumer telemedicine companies." By Tara Jain, Richard J. Lu, and Ateev Mehrotra. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), September 10, 2019, pp. 925-926.
    Addresses the increasing popularity of direct-to-consumer [DTC] drug telemedicine and considers potential strengths and weaknesses of this health care model.
  • "Using telemedicine to treat opioid use disorder in rural areas." By Rita Rubin. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), September 17, 2019, pp. 1029-1031.
    Describes how telemedicine has been employed to treat opioid use disorder [OUD] patients in rural areas. Notes the regulatory and reimbursement issues that have slowed progress in implementing telemedicine for treating OUD.
  • "EIA [Energy Information Administration]: Global oil market expected to remain in balance in second half." Oil and Gas Journal, September 2, 2019, pp. 45-46.
    Summarizes the U.S. Energy Information Administration's latest Short-Term Energy Outlook.
  • "Municipal annexation reform in Texas: how a victory for property rights jeopardizes the state's financial health." By Julie Polansky Bell. St. Mary's Law Journal, Vol. 50, No. 2, 2019, pp. 711-738 (Note Length).
    Provides an overview of municipal annexation. Examines the legislative history of recent reforms enacted by SB6, 85th Legislature, 1st C.S. - the Municipal Annexation Right to Vote Act. Considers the future impact of these reforms on cities and the state.
  • "To rein in cities, Texas tries to ban their lobbying." By David Montgomery. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), September 17, 2019, pp. 1-7.
    Discusses proposed legislation from the 86th Legislature (SB29 and HB281) that would have affected lobbying activities by cities, counties, and other local governments. Explains that the legislation did not pass, but may come up in a future legislative session.
  • "State, fed authorities work on hemp regulations, information." By Jessica Domel. Texas Agriculture, September 6, 2019, p. 10.
    Outlines the responsibilities that the Texas Department of Agriculture must contend with now that the 2018 Farm Bill and HB1325, 86th Legislature, have legalized hemp cultivation. Summarizes various aspects hemp farmers must address, such as crop insurance, pesticides, and hemp in food products and supplements.
  • "Rounds: News from America's best medical society." By Amy Lynn Sorrel and Joey Berlin. Texas Medicine, September 2019, pp. 14-16.
    Notes Representative John Zerwas' retirement from the legislature and new role as executive vice chancellor for health affairs with The University of Texas System. Discusses rulemaking phase of implementing SB1264, 86th Legislature, relating to surprise billing.

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