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House Committee Resources: International Relations & Economic Development, Natural Resources

Friday, August 14
 
Committee Resources
The committees have requested written submissions on the following topics. Below are resources related to those topics.
 
Charge 1: Monitor the agencies and programs under the Committee's jurisdiction and oversee the implementation of relevant legislation passed by the 86th Legislature. Conduct active oversight of all associated rulemaking and other governmental actions taken to ensure intended legislative outcome of all legislation, including the following:
  • HB 680, which relates to reporting requirements for the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) and local workforce development boards regarding the provision of child care. Monitor the TWC's and local workforce development boards' reporting of certain metrics related to the type and quality of child care being provided. Examine the information provided by the TWC to recommend strategies to increase access and participation in the Texas Rising Star program.
  • SB 753, which relates to wage requirements for certain community rehabilitation programs employing people with disabilities. Examine the process by which state agencies collaborate, plan, and implement strategies to assist community rehabilitation programs in creating a minimum wage plan. Monitor the process and circumstances that allow for certain community rehabilitation programs to be exempted from the minimum wage plan requirements.
 
Charge 2: Study Texas' current and future workforce pipeline structure, with a focus on input from the state's largest industries and middle skill employers. Examine what skill gaps exist within our state; identify methods of improving regional coordination and alignment between industry, the public workforce system, public schools, higher education institutions, and community-based organizations to create college and career pathways; and provide recommendations to overcome barriers in the workforce pipeline and to enhance career path options.
 
Charge 3: Study the state's seaport infrastructure and the infrastructure at land ports of entry to facilitate international trade and economic growth. Examine seaport infrastructure and the auxiliary rail and roadway needs connected to each port as well as the port's ability to keep pace with oil and gas production. Make recommendations to maximize the economic flow of goods and products to and from seaports and study the feasibility and economic impact of dredging and widening Texas ports in order to remain competitive in international trade. Examine the infrastructure at international border ports of entry in Texas and identify  transportation-related impediments to international trade that negatively impact the state. Make recommendations to reduce border wait times, facilitate economic growth, and expedite trade. (Joint charge with the House Committee on Transportation)
 
Charge 4: Examine and report on policy proposals from business, labor, and other states that utilize portable platforms to address the growing number of independent contractors and employees in the "gig economy." Study the effects and implementation of the new rules adopted by the TWC related to the "gig economy."
 
Charge 5: Review the connection between the economic vitality of business and industry and the economic vitality of our military veterans transitioning into the workforce. Specifically, the committee should analyze barriers to military veterans transitioning from active duty to civilian life, the effectiveness of government transition and training benefits, and current and ongoing demand for veteran and military spouse employment from industry in Texas. (Joint charge with the House Committee on Defense & Veterans' Affairs)
Charge 6: Monitor the State Auditor's review of agencies and programs under the Committee's jurisdiction. The Chair shall seek input and periodic briefings on completed audits for the 2019 and 2020 fiscal years and bring forth pertinent issues for full committee consideration.
 
House Committee on Natural Resources
Charge 1: Monitor the agencies and programs under the Committee's jurisdiction and oversee the implementation of relevant legislation passed by the 86th Legislature. Conduct active oversight of all associated rulemaking and other governmental actions taken to ensure intended legislative outcome of all legislation, including the following:
 
In conducting its oversight functions, the Committee will also monitor:
  • HB 723, which relates to the requirement that the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality obtain or develop updated water availability models for certain river basins.
  • Updates to Groundwater Availability Models by the Texas Water Development Board
 
Charge 2: Study the efforts of the TCEQ, the TWDB, and the Public Utility Commission of Texas to incentivize, promote, and preserve regional projects to meet water supply needs and encourage public and private investment in water infrastructure. Identify impediments or threats to regionalization with special emphasis on: 
 
Charge 3: Monitor the joint planning process for groundwater and the achievement of the desired conditions for aquifers by groundwater conservation districts.
 
Charge 4: Monitor the State Auditor's review of agencies and programs under the Committee's jurisdiction. The Chair shall seek input and periodic briefings on completed audits for the 2019 and 2020 fiscal years and bring forth pertinent issues for full committee consideration.
 
In conducting its oversight functions, the Committee will specifically monitor the following reports by the State Auditor's Office:
 
The committee also seeks written submissions on the following topics:
  • Emerging issues in groundwater and surface water interaction, in particular in areas of increasing competition for scarce resources.
  • The status of water markets in Texas and the potential benefits of and challenges to expanded markets for water.
 
 
 

Current Articles & Research Resources, August 13

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Explore how states are responding to COVID-19 by implementing policies related to occupational licensing. (Council of State Governments, ©2020)
  • See what states are doing to close budget gaps resulting from decreased revenue caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. (National Conference of State Legislatures, August 12, 2020)
  • Read about facility-wide COVID-19 testing in nursing homes. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, August 11, 2020)
  • Track which businesses received CARES Act stimulus funding and how much they received. (Good Jobs First, ©2020)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • 20.08.13 / "End affirmative action for white people." By Anthony P. Carnevale, Peter Schmidt, and Jeff Strohl. Chronicle for Higher Education, June 24, 2020, pp. 22-25.
    Argues higher education's perception of education merit hides deep-seated racism and class-based elitism guaranteeing the intergenerational reproduction of class and racial privilege. Explains COVID-19 and the ensuing economic and demographic changes offer an opportunity for federal and state governments to require more transparency and seek improved outcomes for public institutions.
  • 20.08.14 / "Inside the challenges Texas women face." By Bill Hethcock. Dallas Business Journal, August 7, 2020, pp. 10-15.
    Examines how economic factors related to education, housing, health insurance, and child care affect women's lives in the Lone Star State. Uses data from the Texas Women's Foundation report Economic Issues for Women in Texas.
  • 20.08.15 / "Taxing and spending: From unthinkable to universal." Economist, August 8th-14th, 2020, pp. 1-2.
    Reports the idea of a universal basic income [UBI] is gaining momentum in America. Points out the launch of Mayors for a Guaranteed Income, a network of mayors experimenting with UBI-like schemes that includes the mayors of Atlanta, Los Angeles, Newark, and St Paul.
  • 20.08.16 / "The economic impact of Texas community colleges." By Patrick Graves, et al. Fiscal Notes, June/July, 2020, pp. 7-10.
    Highlights a recent Comptroller's office study that found a total economic impact of $9.8 billion annually for Texas public community colleges. Discusses the important dual role community colleges play in access to higher education and workforce training.
  • 20.08.17 / "Community use of face masks and COVID-19: Evidence from a natural experiment of state mandates in the US." By Wei Lyu and George L. Wehby. Health Affairs, August 2020, pp. 1419-1425.
    Reports on a natural experiment on the effects of state government mandates for face mask use in public issued by fifteen states and Washington, D.C., between April 8 and May 15, 2020. Finds that states mandating the use of face masks in public had a greater decline in daily COVID-19 growth rates after issuing these mandates.
  • 20.08.18 / "Incarceration and its disseminations: COVID-19 pandemic lessons from Chicago's Cook County Jail." By Eric Reinhart and Daniel L. Chen. Health Affairs, August 2020, pp. 1412-1418.
    Evaluates how arrest and pretrial detention practices may be contributing to the spread of COVID-19. Uses data from Cook County Jail to analyze the relationship between jailing practices and community infections at the ZIP code level.
  • 20.08.19 / "Key questions about nursing home regulation and oversight in the wake of COVID-19." By MaryBeth Musumeci and Priya Chidambaram. Henry J. Kaiser Foundation, August 3, 2020, pp. 1-2.
    Discusses nursing home regulation and oversight in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. Examines the evolution of federal nursing home requirements and their enforcement as well as how oversight has changed as a result of the pandemic. Includes discussion of the role of state survey agencies and an appendix of related statutory citations.
  • 20.08.20 / "State hybrid retirement plans." National Association of State Retirement Administrators, June 2020, pp. 1-12.
    Examines two hybrid public retirement plan designs: a cash balance plan and a combination defined benefits [DB] and defined contribution [DC] plan. Includes Texas municipal, county, and district pension plans. Notes heightened attention to hybrid plans amid recent state reforms to public pension benefits and financing.
  • 20.08.21 / "I don't want to be anybody's employee." By Kim Kavin. Reason, August/September 2020, pp. 46-51.
    Considers legislative attempts to reclassify independent contractors as traditional salaried employees with benefits. Highlights the 2019 passage of California Assembly Bill 5, and argues it has unintended consequences and should serve as a cautionary tale for future legislative efforts.
  • 20.08.22 / "Balancing act: Protecting critical infrastructure and peoples' right to protest." By Dan Shea. State Legislatures, July 21, 2020, pp. 1-3.
    Reports several states have passed laws that either criminalize unlawful entry to critical infrastructure facilities or enhance the penalties associated with those offenses. Points out these laws' penalties and prison terms have the potential to limit civil demonstrations and may infringe on conduct protected under the United States Constitution.
  • 20.08.23 / "Pandemic poses legal pitfalls." By Joey Berlin. Texas Medicine, August 2020, pp. 38-40.
    Argues in favor of temporarily extending existing liability protections for volunteers to all physicians, health care practitioners, and facilities during the COVID-19 pandemic. Mentions a recent letter by the Texas Medical Association and other groups to Governor Greg Abbott requesting liability protection.
  • 20.08.24 / "After the protests: Four perspectives on the state's criminal justice system." By Christopher Hooks. Texas Monthly, August 2020, pp. 1-8.
    Interviews four individuals with different perspectives on how police departments and the criminal justice system in Texas can be reformed in consideration of recent public demonstrations following the death of George Floyd. Includes comments by Representative James White.
  • 20.08.25 / "The plague election." By Molly Ball. Time, August 17-24, 2020, pp. 30-37.
    Examines how the COVID-19 pandemic has transformed political campaigns and the election system in the United States. Addresses political conventions and vote-by-mail in Texas.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) – School Reopening Resources

Seeking information on reopening schools this Fall? We've compiled a list of resources from various state, federal, and independent organizations that you may find helpful. Please use contact information on the respective organizations' websites for any questions specific to their purposes.

 

State Resources

Federal Resources

Educational Association Resources

Reports and Other Online Resources

 

 

Cover image by Flickr user Scott Goddard and used under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Hurricane Season 2020

Hurricane Harvey on the verge of making landfall on the Texas coast on August 25, 2017, (flickr.com/photos/noaasatellites/36816394625: accessed July 16, 2020), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, crediting Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA).

Hurricane season for the Atlantic basin, which includes the Gulf of Mexico, runs from July 1st through November 31st each year.  Preparing for the 2020 hurricane season may require additional planning due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Below we've listed state and federal resources related to hurricane preparedness, emergency planning and management, and disaster assistance. Several include information that addresses the additional challenges to emergency management created by the COVID-19 pandemic. Please use the contact information on the respective organizations' websites for any questions specific to their purposes.

 

Looking for historical gubernatorial disaster declarations or legislative reports? Our Texas Governors database includes past gubernatorial proclamations, including disaster declarations related to hurricanes. The database contains a link to the popular search Disaster declarations and related materials, 2001-present. Our Legislative reports database also contains committee reports related to tropical storms, Hurricane Harvey, and emergency management

 

Texas Resources

 

Office of the Texas Governor

  • Texas Hurricane Center
    Provides guidance and resources on how to prepare for a hurricane. Updated to include timely information related to evacuations and open emergency shelters.

Public Utility Commission of Texas

  • Storm Resources
    Provides information on road closures, utility contacts, and an electic outage map.

  • Texas Emergency Portal
    Provides access to critical information during emergencies. Includes information related to the hurricane season: preparing for a storm, evacuating to safety, accessing government resources, dealing with emergencies, and avoiding scams and frauds.

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

  • Hurricanes
    Lists links to resources related to hurricane preparation as well as recovery after a disaster, including animal issues.

Texas Department of Insurance

  • Disasters: How to Prepare and Recover
    Includes links to resources related to home, property, and auto insurance coverage for disasters, including reviewing policies and filling claims.

Texas Department of Transportation

  • Hurricane Information
    Includes maps of evacuation routes from the Texas coast and a link to guides for traveling major highways in the region during an evacuation.

Texas Division of Emergency Management

  • Local Emergency Management Planning Guide, January 2008
    Provides recommendations to local officials on how to prepare and keep current a local or inter-jurisdictional emergency management plan. Outlines local, state, and federal government emergency management responsibilities.
     
  • State of Texas Emergency Management Plan
    Includes links to the basic emergency management plan for the state and plans for more in-depth emergency support functions.

 

Federal and National Resources

 

American Flood Coalition

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), United States Department of Health and Human Services

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), United States Department of Homeland Security

  • DisasterAssistance.gov
    Allows users to find and apply for disaster assistance. Includes an interactive map of current federally-declared disasters.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), United States Department of Commerce

  • National Hurricane Center
    Provides up-to-date forecasts and warnings of hazardous tropical weather, including tropical storms and hurricanes.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OHSA), United States Department of Labor

  • Hurricane Preparedness and Response
    Documents employer responsibilities and workers' rights associated with response and recovery operations after a hurricane. Includes links to fact sheets for related worker safety and health resources.

 

Information on this page is provided as a public service by the Legislative Reference Library. The Legislative Reference Library makes no representation as to its completeness or accuracy and makes no warranty in regard to its use. Users assume all risk of reliance on the information included on this site.

 

House Committee Resources: Ways & Means, Mass Violence Prevention & Community Safety

Monday, August 10                                                                                        
 
Committee Resources
The committees have requested written submissions on the following topics. Below are resources related to those topics.
House Committee on Ways & Means (Interim Charge 1.1)
Charge 1.1: Monitor the agencies and programs under the Committee's jurisdiction and oversee the implementation of relevant legislation passed by the 86th Legislature. Conduct active oversight of all associated rulemaking and other governmental actions taken to ensure intended legislative outcome of all legislation, including the following:
 
House Committee on Ways & Means (Interim Charges 1.3, 2, 3, and 4)
Charge 1.3: Monitor the agencies and programs under the Committee's jurisdiction and oversee the implementation of relevant legislation passed by the 86th Legislature. Conduct active oversight of all associated rulemaking and other governmental actions taken to ensure intended legislative outcome of all legislation, including the following:
  • HB 4347, which relates to the use of hotel occupancy, sales, and mixed beverage tax revenue for qualified projects. Examine the effectiveness and efficiency of the hotel projects, qualified hotel projects, and uses of local hotel occupancy tax revenue. Examine the negative fiscal impact to the state resulting from the dedication of the state portion of those taxes.
 
Charge 2: Study and consider possible methods of providing property tax relief, including potential sources of revenue that may be used to reduce or eliminate school district maintenance and operations property tax rates. 
 
Charge 3: Study the role of the local option sales and use tax, including: an analysis of the available uses for those taxes, specifically economic development agreements; the statewide distribution of local tax rates; the proportion of the local government budget supported by sales and use taxes; the application of consistent sales sourcing rules; and the impact of shifting from origin to destination sourcing.
 
Charge 4: Evaluate the status of water recycling and reuse efforts in the oil and gas industry in Texas and elsewhere. Evaluate options for tax credits, deductions, or discounts to encourage recycling, treatment, or reuse of produced water from oil and gas production activities. Make recommendations on statutory or regulatory changes needed to promote recycling and reuse strategies for produced water. (Joint charge with the House Committee on Energy Resources)
 
 
Duty (4): Evaluate the ongoing and long-term workforce needs of the state related to cybersecurity, mental health, law enforcement, and related professionals;  
 
 
 

Current Articles & Research Resources, August 6

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Consider COVID-19's impact on agriculture in the United States. (The Hill, August 4, 2020)
  • Learn how to look for signs of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM). (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, August 2020)
  • Read about how the Texas Department of State Health Services changed the way COVID-19 fatalities are counted. (Texas Department of State Health Services, July 27, 2020)
  • Review the deadline calendar for the upcoming November 3 general election. (Texas Secretary of State, accessed August 5, 2020)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • 20.08.01 / "Failing grades: States' responses to COVID-19 in jails & prisons." By Emily Widra and Dylan Hayre. American Civil Liberties Union, June 25, 2020, pp. 1-20.
    Rates state responses to COVID-19 within correctional facilities based upon the availability of testing and personal protective equipment [PPE] for staff and inmates, the reduction in county jail and state prison populations, and the public availability of data on COVID-19 in the state prison system. Notes over 570 incarcerated individuals and over 50 correction staff have died of COVID-19 as of June 22, 2020.
  • 20.08.02 / "Economists weigh in on Austin's recovery prospects as pandemic lingers." By Mike Cronin. Austin Business Journal, July 31, 2020, pp. A4-A5.
    Presents the views of three prominent economists on the long-term resiliency of the Austin and Central Texas economies.
  • 20.08.03 / "As a statue falls, Texas Rangers are cast as heroes and villains." By Henry Gass. Christian Science Monitor, July 27, 2020, pp. 1-4.
    Explores the history of the Texas Rangers in the context of the current focus on racial tensions and law enforcement. Suggests the organization's 2023 bicentennial offers an opportunity to acknowledge its complicated history and move toward a more just and equitable future.
  • 20.08.04 / "Texas' international trade." By David Green and Shannon Halbrook. Fiscal Notes, June/July, 2020, pp. 1, 3-6.
    Explores the benefits of international trade for Texas, the role of energy, recent controversies over tariffs and trade agreements, and the long-term international outlook.
  • 20.08.05 / "Mental health and substance use state fact sheets." Henry J. Kaiser Foundation, July 10, 2020, pp. 1-18.
    Summarizes national data on mental health from a number of sources before and during the coronavirus pandemic. Provides links to state-level fact sheets with statistics on the prevalence of mental illness and substance use, related deaths, access to treatment, affordability, and costs of care. Includes a link to the fact sheet for Texas.
  • 20.08.06 / "Cost-of-living adjustments." National Association of State Retirement Administrators, June 2020, pp. 1-16.
    Discusses periodic cost-of-living adjustments [COLAs] in state and local government pensions, common COLA types and features, COLA costs, and recent changes. Features an appendix of COLA provisions by state, including the Texas County and District Retirement System, Employees Retirement System of Texas, Texas Municipal Retirement System, and Teacher Retirement System of Texas.
  • 20.08.07 / "COVID-19 pulls back the mask on America's prison system." By C.J. Ciaramella. Reason, August/September 2020, p. 10.
    Explains the failed attempts to control the spread of COVID-19 in prisons through policies aimed at reducing incarcerated populations. Summarizes inmate lawsuits related to this issue, including the Texas case, Valentine v. Collier, in which the United States Supreme Court ruled against inmates.
  • 20.08.08 / "What a new Supreme Court decision means for Native American sovereignty." By Nora McGreevy. Smithsonian Magazine, July 10, 2020, pp. 1-3.
    Discusses the impact of McGirt v. Oklahoma, a recent United States Supreme Court decision that found, regarding jurisdiction, "much of the eastern half of Oklahoma falls within Native American territory."
  • 20.08.09 / "Legislator profile: Texas Representative Tom Oliverson." By Suzanne Weiss. State Legislatures, July 23, 2020, pp. 1-2.
    Profiles Representative Tom Oliverson's service as a member of the Texas Legislature, commending his ability to work across party lines and learn about the nuts and bolts of policy.
  • 20.08.10 / "State court chief justices pledge reform to boost racial equality and justice in the courts." By Angela Morris. Texas Lawyer, July 30, 2020, pp. 1-2.
    Reports on a resolution by the Conference of Chief Justices and Conference of State Court Administrators which pledges action to eradicate systemic racism and make court systems fairer to people of color. Includes comments by Texas Supreme Court Chief Justice Nathan Hecht.
  • 20.08.11 / "Unforseen circumstances: Contractual obligations during a pandemic." By Rusty Adams. Tierra Grande, July 2020, pp. 26-27.
    Discusses Texas contract law and whether the “acts of God” or force majeure principles affect contractual obligations during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • 20.08.12 / "Child care and feeding young children during the pandemic." By Catherine Kuhns and Gina Adams. Urban Institute Brief, July 2020, pp. 1-19.
    Points out significant gaps in the extent to which children in child care programs who were receiving meals through the Child and Adult Care Food Program [CACFP] were able to continue accessing food during the pandemic when child care programs closed. Offers recommendations to ensure that young children’s nutritional needs are met in the current crisis and to build a more resilient system moving forward.

 

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Primary Update: Members Not Returning, 87th Legislature

In January, we compiled a list of members not returning to the 87th Texas Legislature. An updated list that includes the results of the recent primary election is provided below. 17 members of the Texas House and 2 members of the Texas Senate will not return in 2021. To see a full list of members of the 86th Texas Legislature (2019), please go here. Note that regardless of election outcomes, all of these legislators will keep their respective seats until January 2021, unless they resign earlier.

 

Information about primary elections requiring runoffs is available on the Secretary of State's current elections page.

 

 

Lorraine Birabil Defeated in Democratic primary election, 7/14/2020
Rep. César Blanco Running for Texas Senate District 29
Rep. Dwayne Bohac Retiring
Rep. Dennis Bonnen Retiring
Anna Eastman Defeated in Democratic primary election, 7/14/2020
Rep. Jessica Farrar Resigned effective 9/30/2019
Rep. Dan Flynn Defeated in Republican primary election, 7/14/2020
Roland Gutierrez Running for Texas Senate District 19
Rep. Eric Johnson Elected Mayor of Dallas, sworn in 6/17/2019
Rep. Mike Lang Running for Hood County Commissioner
Rep. Rick Miller Retiring
Poncho Nevárez Retiring
J.D. Sheffield Defeated in Republican primary election, 7/14/2020
Rep. Jonathan Stickland Retiring
Rep. John Wray Retiring
Rep. Bill Zedler Retiring
Rep. John Zerwas Resigned 9/30/19 to take new position as Executive Vice Chancellor of Health Affairs, The University of Texas System
Sen. José Rodríguez Retiring
Kirk Watson Resigned 4/30/2020 to take new position as Founding Dean of the University of Houston's Hobby School of Public Affairs

 

Sunset Commission

During each two-year legislative cycle, the Texas Sunset Advisory Commission evaluates about 20 to 30 of the approximately 130 entities subject to Sunset review. The Texas Sunset Act provides specific criteria for reviews of occupational licensing agencies. 

 

Topics: Approval of rules; Approval of revised schedule, including postponement of certain reviews

 

 

"Sunset Review Process" graph courtesy of the Texas Sunset Advisory Commission

 

Committee Resources

The committees have requested written submissions on the following topics. Below are resources related to those topics.

 

Charge 1: Monitor the agencies and programs under the Committee's jurisdiction and oversee the implementation of relevant legislation passed by the 86th Legislature. Conduct active oversight of all associated rulemaking and other governmental actions taken to ensure intended legislative outcome of all legislation, including the following:

  • HB 1300 and HB 2321, which relate to the regulation of oyster harvesting and to cultivated oyster mariculture. Monitor the implementation of the cultivated oyster mariculture program, the implementation of increased penalties related to the regulation of oyster harvesting, and the effectiveness of these state laws as related to the protection, conservation, and sustainability of oysters in Texas coastal waters.

 

  • HB 1422, which is the Texas Historical Commission (THC) sunset legislation. Monitor the implementation and transfer of certain historical sites from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) to the THC, including any additional land acquired by the TPWD and the appropriate coordination with local entities.

 

  • SB 1511, which requires the TPWD to contract with a nonprofit organization for the operation and maintenance of the Battleship "Texas." Monitor the efforts to restore the Battleship "Texas" consistent with state law and historic preservation guidelines.

 

Charge 2: Study the impact of the Capitol Complex Master Plan and ongoing construction as it relates to the operation and management of the Texas State History Museum, specifically its visitor admissions, educational programming, exhibit space, and facility rental. Examine the connectivity of the Capitol Complex Master Plan Mall area to ensure a consistent, dynamic, and sustainable relationship with the State Preservation Board, Texas State History Museum, and Texas State Capitol in its programming and use. Evaluate the infrastructure needs of the Texas State Capitol and the Capitol Visitors Center to ensure the ongoing preservation and operational needs of the historical structures and grounds. (Joint charge with the House Committee on House Administration)  

 

Charge 3: Evaluate the status of the historical marker application process and the production of cast metal historical markers in the state as overseen by the THC. Examine options for future state historical markers, including technology such as laser etching and durable materials other than metal.

 

Charge 4: Study the effectiveness of hunter education courses with regard to hunters and firearm safety in the state. Explore additional firearm safety resources and their potential use by the TPWD to reduce accidental shootings.

 

Charge 5: Review the effectiveness of the State Historic Preservation Tax Credit on preserving historic structures and revitalizing Texas communities since the tax credit became effective. 

 

Charge 6: Monitor the State Auditor's review of agencies and programs under the Committee's jurisdiction. The Chair shall seek input and periodic briefings on completed audits for the 2019 and 2020 fiscal years and bring forth pertinent issues for full committee consideration.  

 

Charge 1: Monitor the agencies and programs under Article II and oversee the implementation of relevant legislation and riders passed by the 86th Legislature. In conducting this oversight, the Subcommittee will also specifically monitor:  

  • impact of funding and implementation of legislation related to post-permanency services for children exiting the Texas foster care system;
  • progress on construction of state hospitals and the capacity of the state hospital system to provide mental health support in all regions across Texas;

  • impact of funding to increase the base wage for attendant services and additional investments in the wage enhancement programs;

  • Medicaid cost containment efforts

 

 

Charge 3: Review the ability of hospital finance methods, including trauma funding, graduate medical education payments, and supplemental payment programs, to support all hospitals in Texas (including rural and children's hospitals), and the potential impact from state and federal budgetary changes. 

 

Charge 4: Monitor the implementation and expansion of Community-Based Care by the Department of Family and Protective Services.

 

Charge 5: Examine state investments in the health and brain development of babies and toddlers, including Early Childhood Intervention and other early childhood programs for children in the first three years. Evaluate opportunities to boost child outcomes and achieve longer-term savings.

 

Charge 6: Examine the financial impact of the multi-state opioid settlements to the state of Texas. Review the amount of money the state may receive to the state treasury under the settlements and any restrictions placed on the use of funds. Determine which programs and services provide the best opportunities for reducing opioid dependence and abuse in the state.

 

Charge 7: Monitor the use of funding for the Alternatives to Abortion program to ensure it is achieving the intended goals and providing access to all eligible recipients in a cost effective manner. Evaluate the use of additional funding provided under HHSC Rider 80, and ensure that awards to the program are made competitively, consistent with all applicable state contracting regulations, and in a manner that provides the greatest access to services. Evaluate HHSC benchmarks used to monitor performance and contract oversight of program providers.