LRL Home - Points of Interest

Interim Hearings – Week of January 6

Today's Committee Meetings on the LRL website is a calendar of interim committee hearings with links to agendas. Below are resources related to upcoming Interim Hearings.

 

For recent posts on Interim Hearings, see Interim Hearing Resources on the LRL homepage. The "Recent Entries" list on the left provides quick access to interim hearings posts from previous weeks.

 

January 9

House Select Committee on Mass Violence Prevention & Community Safety (El Paso)

Duties:

(1) Examine options for strengthening enforcement measures for current laws that prevent the transfer of firearms to felons and other persons prohibited by current law from possessing firearms 

(2) Examine impediments and challenges to the timely reporting of relevant criminal history information and other threat indicators to state and federal databases 

(3) Examine the role of digital media and technology in threat detection, assessment, reporting, and prevention, including the collaboration between digital media and law enforcement 

(4) Evaluate the ongoing and long-term workforce needs of the state related to cybersecurity, mental health, law enforcement, and related professionals  

(5) Evaluate current protocols and extreme risk indicators used to identify potential threats and consider options for improving the dissemination of information between federal, state, and local entities and timely and appropriate intervention of mental health professionals 

House Committee on Redistricting (El Paso) 

Topic: 2021 legislative redistricting process and 2020 Census data

 

January 10

House Committee on Redistricting (El Paso) 

Topic: 2021 legislative redistricting process and 2020 Census data

Texas Recognition Months, Weeks, and Days

Recognition months, weeks, and days call attention to health issues, industries, people, and more. Some are codified in Government Code § 662. In addition, senators and representatives pass resolutions in each session to commemorate even more awareness dates. Below is a sampling of recognition months, weeks, and days observed with resolutions and bills by the 86th Legislature; click here to see a list of all the recognition dates from this past session.

 

January

Sexual Assault Survivors Day (January 28)—HB 2298

Community College Day (January 30)—SR 84

 

February

American Heart Month—HR 2140

Texas Homemade Pie Day (February 16)—HR 617

 

March

National Athletic Training Month—HR 1180

Master Sergeant Jonathan J. Dunbar Day (March 30)—HB 295

 

April

Minority Cancer Awareness Month—HR 1391

National Donate Life Month—HR 2141

 

May

Cystic Fibrosis Awareness Month—HR 2142SR 528

International Internal Audit Awareness Month—HR 1514SR 698

 

June

Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Awareness Month—HB 405

Veteran Suicide and PTSD Awareness Month—HCR 148

 

July

Space Exploration Day (July 20)—HB 3084

First Lady Frances Cox Henderson Bicentennial Day (July 21)—SR 163

 

September

Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Month—HR 137HR 2144

Quanah Parker Day (second Saturday of September)—SCR 7

 

October

Veterinary Technician Week—HB 2471

 

November

American Diabetes Month—HR 2145

Municipal Courts Week (first week of November)—HR 1658

 

The year 2020

"The Year to Embrace the Gulf"—HCR 140

Current Articles & Research Resources, December 19

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Consider how many homeowners are interested in having solar panels installed on their homes. (Pew Research Center, December 17, 2019)
  • Review a map of recent flu activity. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, December 2019)
  • Read the Natural Resources newsletter, new from the Texas Comptroller's office. (Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, December 12, 2019)
  • Explore current and archived economic indicators. (U.S. Census Bureau, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Why it feels like everything is going haywire." By Jonathan Haidt and Tobias Rose-Stockwell. Atlantic Monthly, December 2019, pp. 57-60.
    Explores the evolution of social media to explain how it has changed political discourse. Suggests reforms that would make social media more constructive and less destructive.
  • "Warning: Our schools contain vaping." By Sarah Gray. ATPE News (Association of Texas Professional Educators), Winter 2019, pp. 22-25.
    Discusses the problem of vaping in Texas schools. Provides statistics on e-cigarette usage in schools and mentions SB21, 86th Legislature, which raised the age for using tobacco products to 21.
  • "Threat to booze startups' profits emerges in D.C." By Paul Thompson. Austin Business Journal, December 6, 2019, p. 16.
    Reports on a federal excise tax break for craft distilleries that is set to expire on December 31, 2019. Notes that without this tax break, a significant number of "mom and pop" distilleries will go out of business. Related information at: https://www.congress.gov/116/bills/hr1175/BILLS-116hr1175ih.pdf.
  • "What happens after misconduct on campus?" By Emma Pettit. Chronicle of Higher Education, November 29, 2019, pp. A22, A24.
    Considers what actions should be taken by the professor, department, and institution after sexual misconduct has occurred. Highlights the case of University of Texas at Austin professor Coleman Hutchison and the steps the university is taking in response to student protests.
  • "Abuzz over new crop." By Ellyn Ferguson. CQ Weekly, December 2, 2019, pp. 32-34.
    Discusses intent of recent federal hemp regulation. Addresses the challenges of encouraging the fledgling hemp industry and deterring marijuana growers. Mentions hemp production legislation in Texas and Ohio.
  • "Energy storage: To have and to hold." Economist, November 30th-December 6th, 2019, pp. 60-61.
    Reports the battery industry faces several barriers to broader energy storage deployment, as well as a patchwork of rules and regulations.
  • "For many young people, H.S. diploma enough for success." By Catherine Gewertz. Education Week, November 27, 2019, p. 5.
    Summarizes results of two surveys conducted on the value of a college degree. Discusses why a number of Americans believe a high school diploma is sufficient for achieving success.
  • "Declines in pediatric mortality fall short for rural US children." By Janice C. Probst, Whitney Zahnd, and Charity Breneman. Health Affairs, December 2019, pp. 2069-2076.
    Reports that rural children experienced higher mortality rates than urban children, with non-Hispanic black infants and American Indian/Alaska Native children being particularly at risk. Recommends ongoing surveillance of rural children's health, and policies targeting the leading causes of death in rural populations, unintentional injury and suicide.
  • "Rural hospitals: Here today, gone tomorrow." By Nick Bowman. Internet Resource, November 2019, pp.1-24.
    Discusses the recent struggles of rural hospitals and federal efforts to support them through loans, grants, and Medicare reimbursement. Reviews legislation by the fifteen Southern Legislative Conference member states that addresses rural health and rural hospitals.
  • "Surprise bills vary by diagnosis and type of admission." By Karen Pollitz, et al. Internet Resource, December 9, 2019, pp. 1-5.
    Analyzes surprise medical bills and finds that certain groups of patients — patients with surgical and mental health admissions, heart attack patients, and women undergoing mastectomies — may have a higher risk of surprise bills.
  • "What can the United States learn from pharmaceutical spending controls in France?" By Marc A. Rodwin. Internet Resource, November 2019, pp. 1-11.
    Examines France's system of pharmaceutical price and spending controls as a case study. Identifies potential approaches that private and public payers in the United States could use to reduce drug spending without restricting access to new drugs.
  • "Risk sharing: How to hold colleges accountable for the education they provide." By Beth Akers. Issue Brief (Manhattan Institute), December 10, 2019, pp. 1-7.
    Analyzes how the federal government can better measure college quality in order to police access to its student aid.
  • "Cannabidiol products are everywhere, but should people be using them?" By Rita Rubin. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), December 10, 2019, pp. 2156-2158.
    Observes the recent explosion of the CBD [cannabidiol] market, with products ranging from seizure medication and dietary supplements to bath salts and dog biscuits. Considers the problem of determining which CBD products are legal and calls for more research studies to ensure CBD's safe usage.
  • "The opioid crisis, corporate responsibility, and lessons from the tobacco Master Settlement Agreement." By Cheryl Healton, Robert Pack, and Sandro Galea. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), December 3, 2019, pp. 2071-2072.
    Considers how to frame a potential opioid Master Settlement Agreement [MSA], using lessons learned from the tobacco MSA. Proposes that the opioid settlement should create funds dedicated exclusively to proven public health approaches to directly address the opioid epidemic.
  • "Medicaid use among older low-income Medicare enrollees in California and Texas: A tale of two states." By Jacqueline L. Angel, Ronald J. Angel, and Phillip Cantu. Journal of Health Politics, Policy, and Law, December 2019, pp. 885-909.
    Examines Medicaid participation data among Medicare recipients 65 and older in California and Texas, with a particular focus on the older Mexican-origin population. Reports that Texans were more likely than Californians to report coverage at some point in the 17-year follow-up.
  • "The public pension slow burn: When is the flash point?" By Thomas J. Healey. Milken Institute Review, Fourth Quarter 2019, pp. 63-66, 68-70.
    Explores the public pension funding gap in five states — New Jersey, Kentucky, Illinois, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania — that comprises more than a third of the total unfunded pension liabilities in all 50 states combined.
  • "Renewable natural gas: What can we do to move ahead?" By Andreas Thanos, et al. Public Utilities Fortnightly, December 2019, pp. 28-31, 63.
    Discusses recent efforts by states to address renewable natural gas [RNG].
  • "Tiny homes for Austin's homeless." By Chris Moody. Reason, January 2020, pp. 35-40.
    Profiles Austin's Mobile Loaves and Fishes and its Community First! Village providing housing and community for some of Austin's homeless population.
  • "The Texas attorney discipline system." By Seana Willing. Texas Bar Journal, December 2019, pp. 844-845.
    Examines the initial impact of the Sunset Advisory Commission's recommendations to improve the efficiency of the attorney disciplinary system, following the State Bar's sunset review process and legislative changes enacted by SB302, 85th Legislature, R.S.
  • "Q&A: Food allergies in children." By David Doolittle. Texas Medicine, December 2019, pp. 6-7.
    Interviews Austin allergist Allen Lieberman, who asserts that there is a food-allergy epidemic right now. Notes SB66, 84th Legislature, which allowed schools to have undesignated epinephrine that can be used for any child experiencing an allergic reaction.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Holidays at the Capitol

Around the week after Thanksgiving, the holidays start to pop up in and around the Texas Capitol! The House and Senate Chambers are decorated with Virginia pine trees from a north Texas tree farm. The trees were harvested and transported with assistance from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD). The TPWD park rangers from Eisenhower State Park named the Senate tree "Mamie" (after former First Lady Eisenhower), and Lake Mineral Wells State Park rangers called the House's tree "Ruby," honoring the beautiful red color of the cardinals who reside in their park. 

 

Clockwise from left: 1) Senate chambers decorated with "Mamie," as well as its traditional poinsettias on each desk. 2) Wreaths adorn the gallery of the Senate. 3) Each representative's district contributes an ornament to decorate "Ruby." 4) The day after "Ruby" arrived in the House chamber, staff worked to adorn the tree with lights and other decorations.

 

 

Holiday spirit is not contained to the chambers, though! The sights and sounds of the season are all over through the month of December. You can read past blog posts to learn more about the holiday season at the Capitol.

 

Clockwise from left: 1) Visitors approaching the Capitol from Congress will see the tree just outside the Capitol grounds. 2) A wreath adorns the door into the Governor's Public Reception Room on the second floor of the Capitol. 3) The "Holiday Wishes" tree gives Capitol staffers the opportunity to fill holiday wishes for children in the care of Child Protective Services. 4) and 5) The Capitol Rotunda plays host to many different performing groups throughout the holiday season. 4) On December 16, members of the Austin Symphony donned reindeer antlers as they performed and children gathered around. 5) The Dripping Springs High School Jazz Cats sang in the Rotunda on December 5.

 

New & Noteworthy Books and Reports: December 2019

The Library is continually adding new books to its collection. Below are the titles from our December 2019 New & Noteworthy list

Check out and delivery of New & Noteworthy titles is available to legislative staff in Capitol and District offices. To arrange check out and delivery of any of these items, you can submit an online request through the New & Noteworthy page on our website, contact the library at 512-463-1252, or use our PDF request form.

 

1. Biscuits, the Dole, and Nodding Donkeys: Texas Politics, 1929-1932
By Norman D. Brown
Continues the story of Texas politics that the author described in his acclaimed book, Hood, Bonnet, and Little Brown Jug: Texas Politics, 1921 - 1928. Provides a tour of the Texas political landscape during the Great Depression, using the "colorful" political leaders and their backroom deals as a framework for exploring the dominant issues of the early 1930s. Addresses the tension between the federal government and Texas, problems with the state's oil-based economy, and the changing political parties.
University of Texas Press, 2019, 448 pages
976.406 B814B 2019


 

 

2. Conflict and Cooperation: Reflections on the New Deal in Texas
By Milton S. Jordan, George Cooper, editors
Collects essays illustrating the enduring positive effects of New Deal projects and programs in Texas. Considers the impact of New Deal programs on the visual arts and state parks, as well as on different demographic groups, such as women and African Americans.
Stephen F. Austin State University Press, 2019, 154 pages
976.4 J765C 2019


 

 

3. Sam Houston and the Alamo Avengers: The Texas Victory that Changed American History
By Brian Kilmeade
Presents a concise, well-researched account of the Texas Revolution, offering insight into the individuals involved and the historical setting. Includes illustrations, maps, notes, and an extensive bibliography.
Sentinel, 2019, 272 pages
976.4 K558S 2019


 

 

4. Texas Ethics Laws: An Annotated Guide to Lobby and Campaign Finance Laws in Texas
By Andrew Cates
Provides text of the most frequently cited Texas campaign finance and lobby laws along with pertinent primary and secondary sources that illustrate the statutes' applications. Features cross-references to Texas Ethics Commission rules and summaries of numerous Ethics Commission Opinions. Includes relevant Attorney General opinions, case law, and practice notes.
Independently published, 2019, 520 pages
328.33 C283T 2019


 

 

5. Color Coded: Party Politics in the American West, 1950-2016
By Walter T.K. Nugent
Examines political party allegiance and voting trends for nineteen states in the American West between 1950 and 2016. Considers demographic, economic, and social change, as well as key personalities and issues that have shaped each state's political history. Discusses states with notable shifts, states that have remained reliably devoted to one party, and states that have not been consistently blue or red. Includes chapters on Texas, Oklahoma, California, and Oregon, and an appendix with election returns for the years and states discussed.
University of Oklahoma Press, 2018, 374 pages
324.2730978 N896C 2018


 

 

6. New, Renamed, and Abolished State Government Entities, 86th Legislature
By Texas Legislative Council
Highlights state government agencies, interagency panels, advisory committees, and other state governmental entities created, restructured, or eliminated by legislation enacted in the 86th Legislature. Provides information about each entity, including the bill number and specific bill sections that contain provisions pertaining to the entity, effective dates, powers and duties of the entity or whether certain functions were transferred to another entity, membership information, and Sunset or expiration dates.
Texas Legislative Council, 2019, 71 pages
Online at: https://tlc.texas.gov/docs/sessions/86GovEntities.pdf
L1400.8 N42 2019


 

 

7. Summary of Enactments: 86th Legislature
By Texas Legislative Council
Provides summaries of bills and joint resolutions passed by the Texas Legislature in 2019, arranged by subject. Includes bill number, author, sponsor, effective date, and governor's vetoes.
Texas Legislative Council, 2019, 354 pages
Online at: https://tlc.texas.gov/docs/sessions/86soe.pdf
L1400.7 AC27 2019

Interim Hearings – Week of December 16

Today's Committee Meetings on the LRL website is a calendar of interim committee hearings with links to agendas. Below are resources related to upcoming Interim Hearings.

 

For recent posts on Interim Hearings, see Interim Hearing Resources on the LRL homepage. The "Recent Entries" list on the left provides quick access to interim hearings posts from previous weeks.

 

December 20

House Committee on General Investigating

Topic: Consideration and action on the investigation into the circumstances, events, and allegations in connection with a June 12, 2019 meeting between Members of the House and representatives of a Texas nonprofit corporation

Current Articles & Research Resources, December 12

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Read about recent examples of after school programs funded by state and federal dollars. (National Conference of State Legislatures, December 6, 2019)
  • Consider ways to prevent high-risk impaired drivers from repeatedly driving impaired. (Governors Highway Safety Association, December 2019)
  • Explore interactive data related to Texas' most congested roadways. (Texas A&M Transportation Institute, December 10, 2019)
  • Review the most recent report from the Ombudsman for Children and Youth in Foster Care. (Texas Health and Human Services, December 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "Mind the gap: Antitrust, health disparities and telemedicine." By Theodosia Stavroulaki. American Journal of Law & Medicine, 2019, pp. 171-187.
    Questions whether telemedicine is as effective as purported in improving health outcomes, increasing access, and reducing costs. Considers the Teladoc, Inc. v. Texas Medical Board antitrust case and emphasizes the imperative to balance the benefits of technology-driven tools with the need to protect public safety and health.
  • "The secessionist." By Graeme Wood. Atlantic Monthly, December 2019, pp. 18-20.
    Profiles Daniel Miller, leader of the Texas Nationalist Movement, a group seeking Texas' secession from the United States. Highlights the history of Texas secession movements and independence movements involving other countries.
  • "Changes in purchasing-related statutes of special interest to counties." By Narita Holmes. County Progress, December 2019, pp. 12-13.
    Reviews bills passed during the 86th Legislature that require counties to comply with new changes to purchasing-related statutes.
  • "Drug-trafficking: Changing gear." Economist, November 23rd-29th, 2019, pp. 55-56.
    Discusses how drug-trafficking is evolving and diversifying, keeping police one step behind the traffickers.
  • "Public pensions: State of denial." Economist, November 16th-22nd, 2019, pp. 63-64.
    Reports several states with severely underfunded pensions are spiraling towards disaster, as future returns on investments are expected to be lower than normal.
  • "Screen time up as reading scores drop. Is there a link?" By Sarah D. Sparks. Education Week, November 13, 2019, pp. 1, 12.
    Discusses results of the 2019 National Assessment of Educational Progress [NAEP], which indicate reading scores for students in the United States have declined significantly. Investigates how digital reading platforms affect students' reading skills.
  • "The decline in rural medical students: A growing gap in geographic diversity threatens the rural physician workforce." By Scott A. Shipman, et al. Health Affairs, December 2019, pp. 2011-2018.
    Points out that rural background is strongly associated with service to rural and underserved populations, as well as entry into primary care. Urges policy makers and other stakeholders to include rural background in consideration of medical student diversity.
  • "Higher US rural mortality rates linked to socioeconomic status, physician shortages, and lack of health insurance." By Gordon Gong, et al. Health Affairs, December 2019, pp. 2003-2010.
    Considers all-cause mortality rates in rural versus urban areas, noting that the rural rates have been higher in the United States since 1980 and that the gap has been widening. Argues that state efforts to address disparities in health care access could alleviate the higher rates faced by rural residents.
  • "Association of receipt of a housing voucher with subsequent hospital utilization and spending." By Craig Evan Pollack, et al. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), December 3, 2019, pp. 2115-2124.
    Finds that receipt of a housing voucher during childhood was significantly associated with lower rates of hospitalization and less inpatient spending during follow-up. Notes that adults who received vouchers did not experience significant differences in hospital use or spending.
  • "The tragedy of the 'trans' child." By Madeleine Kearns. National Review, December 9, 2019, pp. 29-32, 34-36.
    Examines gender dysphoria in young children and criticizes the work of some medical practitioners working with transgender issues. Focuses on a Texas custody case between the parents of James Younger, in which the mother claims the child is transgender and the father claims the child is not.
  • "The market for prosperity: What every community needs to know to optimize economic development [Part One]." By M. Ray Perryman. Perryman Report and Texas Letter, Vol. 36, No. 9, pp. 1-7.
    Presents the first installment of a two-part series on a framework for local community leaders to embrace the process of economic development.
  • "Militias, patriots, and border vigilantes in the age of Trump." By Jesse Walker. Reason, December 2019, pp. 20-21.
    Compares and contrasts the various "patriot" movement or militia groups that have organized from the Clinton presidency to the current day. Explains the groups represent a wide spectrum of ideas and priorities, not all of which are compatible.
  • "How to win Texas in 2020." By R.G. Ratcliffe. Texas Monthly, December 2019, pp. 64-70.
    Discusses briefly the effect Texas, as a battleground state, could have on federal and state elections. Compares opinions on whether Democrats can become the majority party in Texas and Democratic and Republican strategies for 2020.
  • "The impact of Winkler County." By Cindy Zolnierek. Texas Nursing, Fall 2019, p. 10.
    Describes the legislative impact of the 2009 Winkler County whistleblowing case. Highlights SB192, 82nd Legislature, R.S., which strengthened legal protections for nurses speaking out for patient safety, and HB581, 83rd Legislature, R.S., which allowed publicly employed nurses to participate in civil lawsuits for patient advocacy.
  • "Legal Q&A." By Scott Houston. Texas Town & City, December 2019, pp. 20-24.
    Reviews requirements imposed by the Texas Legislature on municipalities' building codes. Analyzes several pieces of legislation that affect licensing, permits, construction materials, and limitations of city building ordinances.
  • "Fear of mass shootings fuels a thriving bulletproof business." By Melissa Chan. Time, December 16, 2019, pp. 24-25.
    Discusses the recent sales boom of bulletproof backpacks and clothing geared toward students as a measure of protection against school shootings. Questions the effectiveness of such products and whether they are a distraction from focusing on long-term solutions to gun violence.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Legislative Families: Grandchildren, Cousins, In-Laws, and More!

In previous posts on legislative families, we have looked at legislative spouses, siblings, and parents/children. In the final post, we are highlighting the extended family. Many legislators come from families that have devoted countless hours of time and energy to the Texas Legislature. See who has followed in legislative family footsteps over the generations.*

  • Barclay-Lindsey family

    • James Walter Barclay served in the House, 1859–1866 (8th–10th)

      • father-in-law to Dave Lindsey, grandfather to John Lindsey
    • David Sudduth Lindsey served in the House, 1893–1897 (23rd–24th)
      • son-in-law to James Barclay, father to John Lindsey
    • John Lindsey served in the House, 1921–1923 (37th)
      • son to Dave Lindsey, grandson to James Barclay

  • Bee-Tarver family

    • Hamilton Prioleau Bee served in the House, 1851–1859 (3rd–7th)

      • brother-in-law to Edward Tarver, father of Carlos Bee
    • Edward Rex Tarver served in the House, 1895–1897 (24th), 1899–1900 (26th)
      • brother-in-law to Hamilton Bee, uncle to Carlos Bee
    • Carlos Bee served in the Senate, 1915–1919 (34th–35th)
      • son to Hamilton Bee, nephew to Edward Tarver

  • Benavides family

    • Bacilio Benavides served in the House, 1859–1861 (8th)

      • uncle to Santos Benavides
    • Santos Benavides served in the House, 1879–1885 (16th–18th)
      • nephew to Bacilio Benavides

  • Blount-Owsley family

    • J.M. Blount served in the Senate, 1866–1870 (11th)

      • father to James P. Blount
    • James P. Blount served in the House, 1885–1887 (19th)
      • son to J.M. Blount, brother-in-law to J.G. Kearby
    • J.G. Kearby served in the Senate, 1891–1895 (22nd–23rd)
      • brother-in-law to James P. Blount
    • Alvin Clark Owsley served in the House, 1889–1892 (21st–22nd), and 1895–1897 (24th)
      • father to Alvin M. Owsley, son-in-law to J.M. Blount, brother-in-law to James P. Blount
    • Alvin M. Owsley served in the House, 1913–1915 (33rd)
      • son to Alvin C. Owsley, nephew to James P. Blount, grandson to J.M. Blount

  • Bourland-Day-Manion family

    • William H. Bourland served in the House, 1846–1849 (1st–2nd), and 1853–1855 (5th)

      • brother to James Bourland
    • James G. Bourland served in the Senate, 1846–1849 (1st–2nd)
      • brother to William H. Bourland, father-in-law to Samuel Day and A.B. Manion
    • Samuel Day served in the House, 1873–1874 (13th)
      • son-in-law to James Bourland, brother-in-law to Austin Brooks Manion
    • Austin Brooks Manion served in the House, 1876–1879 (15th)
      • son-in-law to James Bourland, brother-in-law to Samuel Day

  • Burleson-Loyd-Negley family

    • Edward Burleson served in the Senate, 1846–1851 (1st–4th)

      • great-uncle to A.J. Loyd, great-grandfather to Laura Burleson Negley
    • Andrew Jackson Loyd served in the House, 1899–1901 (26th)
      • great-nephew to Edward Burleson
    • Laura Burleson Negley served in the House, 1929–1931 (41st)
      • great-granddaughter to Edward Burleson

  • Camp family

    • John Lafayette Camp, Sr. served in the Senate, 1874–1875 (14th)

      • father to John L. Camp, Jr., grandfather to W. Nunnelee Camp
    • John Lafayette Camp, Jr. served in the Senate, 1885–1889 (19th–20th)
      • son to John L. Camp, Sr., uncle to W. Nunnelee Camp
    • W. Nunnelee Camp served in the House, 1911–1912 (32nd)
      • nephew to John L. Camp, Jr., grandson to John L. Camp, Sr.

  • Canales family

    • José Tomás Canales served in the House, 1905–1911 (29th–31st) and 1917–1921 (35th–36th)

      • uncle to Terry Canales, great-uncle to Gabi Canales and Terry A. Canales
    • Terry A. Canales served in the House, 1973–1977 (63rd–64th)
      • father to Gabi Canales and Terry A. Canales, nephew to J.T. Canales
    • Gabi Canales served in the House, 2003–2005 (78th)
      • daughter of Terry A. Canales, sister of Terry Canales, great-niece to J.T. Canales
    • Terry Canales serves in the House, 2013–present (83rd–86th)
      • son of Terry A. Canales, brother of Gabi Canales, great-nephew to J.T. Canales

  • Cocke family

    • Frederick Bird Smith Cocke, Sr. served in the House, 1861–1863 (9th), and 1879–1881 (16th)

      • father to Fred Cocke, Jr. and J.R. Cocke, grandfather to William A. Cocke
    • James Rogers Cocke served in the House, 1893–1897 (23rd–24th)
      • son to Frederick Cocke, Sr., brother to Fred Cocke, Jr., uncle to William A. Cocke
    • Frederick Bird Smith Cocke, Jr. served in the House, 1899–1901 (26th)
      • son to Frederick Cocke, Sr., brother to J.R. Cocke, uncle to William A. Cocke
    • William Alexander Cocke served in the House, 1907–1909 (30th)
      • grandson to Frederick Cocke, Sr., nephew to J.R. Cocke and Fred Cocke, Jr.

  • Crabb family

    • Hillary Crabb served in the House, 1853 (4th) and 1855–1857 (6th)

      • great-grandfather to Joe Crabb
    • Joe Crabb served in the House, 1993–2011 (73rd–81st)
      • great-grandson to Hillary Crabb

  • Cuellar-Martinez family

    • Renato Cuellar served in the House, 1987–1997 (70th–74th)

      • uncle to Armando Martinez
    • Armando Martinez serves in the House, 2005–present (79th–86th)
      • nephew to Renato Cuellar

  • Daniel family

    • Price Daniel, Sr. served in the House, 1939–1945 (46th–48th)

      • brother to Bill Daniel, father to Price Daniel, Jr.
    • Bill Daniel served in the House, 1949–1955 (51st–53rd)
      • brother to Price Daniel, Sr., uncle to Price Daniel, Jr.
    • Price Daniel, Jr. served in the House, 1969–1975 (61st–63rd)
      • son to Price Daniel, Sr., nephew to Bill Daniel

  • De La Garza family

    • Eligio De La Garza served in the House, 1953–1965 (53rd–58th)

      • uncle to Eddie De La Garza
    • Eddie De La Garza served in the House, 1991–1997 (72nd–74th)
      • nephew to Eligio De La Garza

  • Dies family

    • W.W. Dies served in the House, 1897–1901 (25th–26th)

      • uncle to Martin Dies, Jr.
    • Martin Dies served in the Senate, 1959–1967 (56th–59th)
      • nephew to W.W. Dies

  • Dougherty-Leo family

    • Edward Dougherty served in the House, 1859–1861 (8th)

      • father-in-law to Alexander Leo, Jr.
    • Alexander Leo, Jr. served in the House, 1883 (18th)
      • son-in-law to Edward Dougherty

  • Dunnam family

    • W.V. Dunnam, Sr. served in the House, 1917–1919 (35th)

      • grandfather to Jim Dunnam
    • Jim Dunnam served in the House, 1997–2011 (75th–81st)
      • grandson to W.V. Dunnam

  • Durant family

    • John Durant served in the Senate, 1861–1866 (9th–10th)

      • uncle to William Durant
    • William Durant served in the House, 1883–1885 (18th)
      • nephew to John Durant

  • Farrar-Duff family

    • Bowd Farrar served in the House, 1925–1933 (39th–42nd)

      • uncle to Virginia Duff
    • Virginia Elizabeth Duff served in the House, 1951–1963 (52nd–57th)
      • niece to Bowd Farrar

  • Faubion family

    • James Henry Faubion served in the House, 1885–1891 (19th–21st), 1893–1895 (23rd), and in the Senate, 1903–1905 (28th)

      • uncle to H.E. Faubion
    • Herbert Elmo Faubion served in the House, 1919–1925 (36th–38th)
      • nephew to J.H. Faubion

  • Few-Lewis family

    • William Allen Few served in the House, 1933–1934 (43rd)

      • father-in-law to Don A. Lewis
    • Donald A. Lewis served in the House, 1947–1951 (50th–51st)
      • son-in-law to W.A. Few

  • Fowler family

    • John H. Fowler served in the House, 1853–1855 (5th)

      • great-uncle to G.R. Fowler
    • Godfrey Rees Fowler served in the House, 1903–1905 (28th)
      • great-nephew to John H. Fowler

  • Fly family

    • George Washington Lafayette Fly served in the House, 1881–1883 (17th)

      • father to William Madden Fly, grandfather to William Stoner Fly
    • William Madden Fly served in the House, 1915–1923 (34th–37th), and 1926–1929 (39th–40th)
      • son to George Washington Lafayette Fly, uncle to William Stoner Fly
    • William Stoner Fly served in the House, 1947–1953 (50th–52nd), and in the Senate, 1954–1961 (53rd–56th)
      • grandson to George Washington Lafayette Fly, nephew to William Madden Fly

  • Garrison-Carter-Sanford family

    • Caleb Jackson Garrison served in the House, 1876–1881 (15th–16th), and 1883–1885 (18th), and in the Senate, 1885–1889 (20th)

      • brother to T.S. Garrison, uncle to E.H. Carter, great-uncle to Gary B. Sanford
    • Thomas Smith Garrison served in the House, 1897–1899 (25th)
      • brother to C.J. Garrison, uncle to E.H. Carter, grandfather to Gary B. Sanford
    • E.H. Carter served in the Senate, 1911–1914 (32nd–33rd)
      • nephew to C.J. and T.S. Garrison, cousin-once-removed to Gary B. Sanford
    • Gary Bonner Sanford served in the House, 1922–1927 (37th–39th)
      • grandson to T.S. Garrison, great-nephew to C.J. Garrison, cousin-once-removed to E.H. Carter

  • Guinn-Hearne family

    • Robert Guinn served in the Senate, 1853–1870 (5th–11th)

      • brother-in-law to D.T. Hearne
    • D.T. Hearne served in the House, 1883–1887 (18th–19th)
      • brother-in-law to Robert Guinn

  • Hamilton-Perry-Ratliff family

    • David Henry Hamilton served in the House, 1893–1895 (23rd)

      • great-great-grandfather to Rick Perry
    • Rick Perry served in the House, 1985–1991 (69th–71st)
      • great-great-grandson to D.H. Hamilton
    • Dennis Pace Ratliff served in the House, 1931–1935 (42nd–43rd)
      • grandfather-in-law to Rick Perry

  • Hogg family Gov. James Hogg is Joseph's son and Mike's father.

    • Joseph Lewis Hogg served in the Senate, 1846 (1st)

      • grandfather to Mike Hogg
    • Mike Hogg served in the House, 1927–1931 (40th–41st)
      • grandson to Joseph L. Hogg

  • Holland family William is believed to be one of Bird Holland's sons by an enslaved woman. Bird bought the brothers' freedom and took them to Ohio.

    • Spearman Holland served in the House, 1846–1847 (1st), 1857–1859 (7th), and 1861–1863 (9th), and in the Senate, 1863–1866 (10th)

      • brother to Bird Holland, father to James Holland, uncle^ to William Holland
    • Bird Holland served in the House, 1853–1855 (5th)
      • brother to Spearman Holland, father^ to William Holland, uncle to James Holland
    • William H. Holland served in the House, 1876–1879 (15th)
      • son^ to Bird Holland, nephew^ to Spearman Holland, cousin^ to James Holland
    • James K. Holland served in the House, 1849–1851 (3rd), and 1863 (9th), and in the Senate, 1853–1855 (5th)
      • son to Spearman Holland, nephew to Bird Holland, cousin^ to William Holland

  • Jackson-Denny family

    • Robert Hal Jackson served in the House, 1947–1951 (50th–51st)

      • second cousin to Mary Denny
    • Mary Denny served in the House, 1993–2007 (1993–2007)
      • second cousin to Robert Hal Jackson

  • Jolley-Bock family

    • James Jolley served in the House, 1885–1887 (19th)

      • great-grandfather to Bennie Bock II
    • Bennie Bock II served in the House, 1973–983 (63rd–67th)
      • great-grandson to James Jolley

  • Jones-Mills family

    • Henry Jones served in the House, 1846–1847 (1st)

      • father-in-law to Roger Quarles Mills, grandfather to Charles Mills
    • Roger Quarles Mills served in the House, 1859–1861 (8th)
      • son-in-law to Henry Jones, father to Charles Mills
    • Charles H. Mills served in the House, 1913–1915 (33rd)
      • son to Roger Quarles Mills, grandson to Henry Jones

  • Jones family

    • Wiley Jones served in the House, 1863–1866

      • father-in-law to John Mathis
    • John Manson Mathis served in the House, 1918–1919 (35th), and 1931–1935 (42nd–43rd)
      • son-in-law to Wiley Jones

  • Jones family

    • Benjamin Franklin Jones served in the House, 1879–1881 (16th)

      • brother to Charles H. Jones and W.H. Jones, father to J.S. Jones
    • Charles Hill Jones served in the House, 1866–1870 (11th)
      • brother to Benjamin Jones and W.H. Jones, uncle to J.S. Jones
    • William H. Jones served in the House, 1876–1879 (15th), and 1885–1887 (19th)
      • brother to Benjamin Jones and Charles H. Jones, uncle to J.S. Jones
    • James Slaughter Jones served in the House, 1901–1903 (27th)
      • son to Benjamin Jones, nephew to Charles H. Jones and W.H. Jones

  • Lea-Boothe family

    • Pryor Lea served in the Senate, 1861–1866 (9th–10th)

      • grandfather-in-law to Joseph Boothe
    • Joseph Boothe served in the House, 1887–1889 (20th)
      • grandson-in-law to Pryor Lea

  • Mauritz-Patman family

    • Fred Mauritz served in the House, 1935–1939 (44th–45th), and in the Senate, 1941–1947 (47th–50th)

      • father-in-law to Bill Patman
    • William N. Patman served in the Senate, 1961–1981 (57th–66th)
      • son-in-law to Fred Mauritz

  • Maverick family

    • Samuel Augustus Maverick served in the House, 1851–1855, and 1859–1863 (8th–9th), and in the Senate, 1855–1859 (6th–7th)

      • great-grandfather to Maury Maverick
    • Maury Maverick served in the House, 1951–1957 (52nd–54th)
      • great-grandson to Samuel Maverick

  • McLane-Pierce family

    • Charles McLane served in the Senate, 1882–1883 (17th)

      • stepfather to C.C. Pierce
    • C.C. Pierce served in the House, 1907–1910 (30th–31st)
      • stepson to Charles McLane

  • Meyer-Gattis family

    • Charles J.H. Meyer served in the House, 1893–1895 (23rd)

      • great-great-grandfather to Dan Gattis
    • Dan Gattis served in the House, 2003–2011 (78th–81st)
      • great-great-grandson to C.J.H. Meyer

  • Mobley family

  • Moursund family

    • Albert W.H. Moursund served in the House, 1881–1885 (17th–18th)

      • father to Anton N. Moursund, grandfather to Albert Moursund III
    • Anton N. Moursund served in the House, 1901–1903 (27th)
      • son to A.W. Moursund, Sr., father to Travis Moursund, uncle to Albert Moursund III
    • Albert Wadel Moursund III served in the House, 1949–1953 (51st–52nd)
      • grandson to A.W. Moursund, Sr., cousin to Travis Moursund
    • Travis Bruce Moursund served in the House, 1927–1929 (40th)
      • son to Anton N. Moursund, grandson to A.W. Moursund, Sr., cousin to Albert Moursund III

  • Munson family

    • Mordello Stephen Munson served in the House, 1857–1861 (7th–8th), 1866–1870 (11th), and 1875–1876 (14th)

      • father to Milam Stephen Munson, Sr., grandfather to Milam Stephen Munson, Jr.
    • Milam Stephen Munson, Sr. served in the House, 1909–1911 (31st)
      • son to Mordello Stephen Munson, father to Milam Stephen Munson, Jr.
    • Milam Stephen Munson, Jr. served in the House, 1931–1935 (42nd–43rd)
      • son to Milam Stephen Munson, Jr., grandson to Mordello Stephen Munson

  • Patton-Jordan family

    • Edward Patton served in the House, 1891–1893 (22nd)

      • great-grandfather to Barbara Jordan
    • Barbara Jordan served in the Senate, 1967–1973 (60th–62nd)
      • great-granddaughter to Edward Patton

  • Perry-Stevenson-Murr family

    • Henry Grady Perry served in the House, 1921–1923 (37th), and 1949–1953 (51st–52nd)

      • father to Wilbur Wright Perry, brother-in-law to Coke Robert Stevenson
    • Wilbur Wright Perry served in the House, 1953–1955 (53rd)
      • son to H. Grady Perry
    • Coke Robert Stevenson served in the House, 1929–1939 (41st–45th)
      • brother-in-law to H. Grady Perry, grandfather to Andrew Murr
    • Andrew Murr serves in the House, 2015–present (84th–86th)
      • grandson to Coke Robert Stevenson

  • Rains-Barrett family

    • Emory Rains served in the House, 1847–1849 (2nd), 1851–1853 (4th–5th), and in the Senate, 1859–1861 (8th)

      • great-uncle to Eli B. Barrett
    • Eli Brown Barrett served in the House, 1921–1925 (37th–38th), and 1933–1935 (43rd)
      • great-nephew to Emory Rains

  • Rowland-Gough family

    • James Franklin Rowland served in the House, 1889–1893 (21st–22nd)

      • uncle to James Rowland Gough
    • James Rowland Gough served in the House, 1891–1897 (22nd–24th), and in the Senate, 1897–1901 (25th–26th)
      • nephew to J.F. Rowland

  • Runnels family

    • Hiram George Runnels elected but never sworn (7th)

      • uncle to Hardin Runnels and Howell Runnels
    • Hardin Richard Runnels served in the House, 1847–1855 (2nd–5th)
      • brother to Howell Runnels, nephew to Hiram G. Runnels
    • Howell Runnels served in the House, 1855–1859 (6th–7th)
      • brother to Hardin Runnels, nephew to Hiram G. Runnels

  • Russell family

    • William Jarvis Russell served in the House, 1849–1851 (3rd)

      • father to William H. Russell, grandfather to W.J. Russell
    • William H. Russell served in the Senate, 1874–1876 (14th)
      • son to William Jarvis Russell, father to W.J. Russell
    • William Jarvis Russell served in the House, 1893–1895 (23rd), and 1899–1905 (26th–28th)
      • son to William H. Russell, grandson to William Jarvis Russell

  • Shepard family

    • James Shepard served in the House, 1850–1851 (3rd), and 1856–1857 (6th)

      • brother to Chauncy Shepard, uncle to Seth Shepard
    • Chauncy Shepard served in the Senate, 1857–1866 (7th–10th)
      • brother to James Shepard, father to Seth Shepard
    • Seth Shepard served in the Senate, 1874–1876 (14th)
      • son to Chauncy Shepard, nephew to James Shepard

  • Stewart family

    • William Henry Stewart served in the House, 1848–1851 (2nd–3rd), and 1859–1861 (8th)

      • grandfather to Maco Stewart, Jr., great-grandfather to Maco Stewart III
    • Maco Stewart, Jr. served in the House, 1923–1925 (38th)
      • father to Maco Stewart III, grandson to William H. Stewart
    • Maco Stewart III served in the House, 1961–1963 (57th)
      • son to Maco Stewart, Jr., great-grandson to William H. Stewart

  • Stollenwerck family

  • Tarlton-Morrow-Farenthold family

    • Benjamin Tarlton served in the House, 1881–1883 (17th), and 1885–1887 (19th)

      • brother-in-law to W.C. Morrow, grandfather to Frances "Sissy" Farenthold
    • W.C. Morrow served in the Senate, 1913–1917 (33rd–34th)
      • brother-in-law to Benjamin Tarlton, great-uncle to Frances "Sissy" Farenthold
    • Frances "Sissy" Farenthold served in the House, 1969–1973 (61st–62nd)
      • granddaughter to Benjamin Tarlton, great-niece to W.C. Morrow

  • Terrell family

    • Henry Berryman Terrell served in the House, 1901–1909 (27th–30th), and in the Senate, 1909–1915 (31st–34th)

      • brother to George Terrell, uncle to J. Turney Terrell
    • George Butler Terrell served in the House, 1899–1903 (26th–27th), 1907–1913 (30th–32nd), 1917–1920 (35th–36th), and 1931–1933 (42nd)
      • brother to H.B. Terrell, father to J. Turney Terrell
    • J. Turney Terrell served in the House, 1930–1933 (41st–42nd)
      • son to George Terrell, nephew to H.B. Terrell

  • Thurmond family

    • Pulaski A. Thurmond served in the House, 1863 (9th)

      • brother to George Thurmond and Alfred Thurmond
    • Alfred Thurmond served in the House, 1866–1870 (11th), and 1873–1874 (13th)
      • brother to George Thurmond and Pulaski Thurmond
    • George Murat Thurmond served in the House, 1901–1903 (27th)
      • brother to Alfred Thurmond and Pulaski Thurmond, father to Roger H. Thurmond, grandfather to George M. Thurmond and Roger H. Thurmond, Jr.
    • Roger Harold Thurmond served in the House, 1929 (41st)
      • son of George Thurmond, father to George M. Thurmond and Roger H. Thurmond, Jr., nephew to Alfred Thurmond and Pulaski Thurmond
    • George Murat Thurmond served in the House, 1955–1959 (54th–55th)
      • grandson of George M. Thurmond, great-nephew of Alfred Thurmond and Pulaski Thurmond
    • Roger H. Thurmond, Jr. served from 1959–1967 (56th–59th)
      • grandson of George M. Thurmond, great-nephew of Alfred Thurmond and Pulaski Thurmond

  • Truitt-Stephens family

    • James Alfred Truitt served in the Senate, 1846–1849 (1st–2nd), 1851–1853 (4th), 1855–1859 (6th–7th), and 1866–1870 (11th)

      • grandfather to James W. Truitt, John H. Truitt, and J.H. Stephens
    • Alfred M. Truit served in the Senate, 1849–1851 (3rd)
      • son of James Alfred Truitt, uncle^ to James W. Truitt and John H. Truitt
    • James W. Truitt served in the House, 1881–1883 (17th), and 1891–1895 (22nd–23rd)
      • brother to John H. Truitt, grandson to James Alfred Truitt, nephew^ to Alfred M. Truitt, cousin^ to J.H. Stephens
    • John Hays Truitt served in the House, 1887–1889 (20th)
      • brother to James W. Truitt, grandson to James Alfred Truitt, nephew^ to Alfred M. Truitt, cousin^ to J.H. Stephens
    • John Hall Stephens served in the House, 1889–1893 (21st–22nd)
      • grandson to James Alfred Truitt, cousin^ to James W. Truitt and John H. Truitt

  • Wurzbach-Kleberg-Eckhardt family

    • Charles Louis Wurzbach served in the House, 1876–1885 (15th–18th), and 1891–1892 (22nd)

      • father to William Wurzbach, grandfather to Bob Eckhardt
    • William Augustus Wurzbach served in the House, 1895–1897 (24th)
      • son to Charles Wurzbach, uncle to Bob Eckhardt
    • Marcellus Eugene Kleberg served in the House, 1873–1874 (13th)
      • brother to Rudolph Kleberg, uncle to Robert J. Eckhardt, great-uncle to Bob Eckhardt
    • Rudolph Kleberg served in the Senate, 1883–1886 (18th–19th)
      • brother to Marcellus Kleberg, uncle to Robert J. Eckhardt, great-uncle to Bob Eckhardt
    • Robert J. Eckhardt served in the Senate, 1915–1917 (34th)
      • uncle to Bob Eckhardt, nephew to Rudolph Kleberg, nephew to Marcellus Kleberg
    • Robert C. "Bob" Eckhardt served in the House, 1959–1967 (56th–59th)
      • grandson to Charles Wurzbach, nephew to William Wurzbach, nephew to Robert J. Eckhardt, great-nephew to Rudolph Kleberg, great-nephew to Marcellus Kleberg

*Many of the fathers and sons were "Senior" and "Junior," or at least shared the same first name. If we did not find indication of nicknames, we used "FirstName, Sr./Jr." on the second reference. In cases where we believe legislators had a preference for a nickname or abbreviated name, we used that name on the second reference. Names are in chronological order within family groups. We've attempted to identify all of the legislative extended families, but let us know if you think we missed some! This information is provided as a public service by the Legislative Reference Library. The Legislative Reference Library makes no representation as to its completeness or accuracy and makes no warranty in regard to its use. Users assume all risk of reliance on the information included on this site.

 
^ denotes where we are fairly certain of a familial connection but do not have sufficient documentation. Let us know if you can help confirm or deny our hunches!

Current Articles & Research Resources, December 5

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Explore the effects of privatizing state parks. (Stateline, December 3, 2019)
  • Consider how census counts affect transportation infrastructure funding. (U.S. Census Bureau, December 4, 2019)
  • Read the recent Alternatives to Abortion report. (Texas Health and Human Services, December 2019)
  • See which sidewalks are pedestrian-safe in the Capitol Complex Project area. (Texas Facilities Commission, November 8, 2019)

Members of the Texas legislative community may request the articles below here or by calling 512-463-1252.

  • "State lawmakers plan to push bills letting athletes profit from fame." By Wesley Jenkins. Chronicle of Higher Education, November 15, 2019, p. A23.
    Considers the NCAA [National Collegiate Athletic Association] policy change that allows student athletes to profit from their name, image, and likeness. Highlights legislative proposals at the federal level and in various states, including a law passed by California ensuring athletes' rights to compensation.
  • "Sealing criminal records: Clean slates, rich states." Economist, November 16th-22nd, 2019, pp. 26-27.
    Discusses the bipartisan movement underway in several states to expunge tens of millions of old criminal records, partly to boost the supply of local labor but also to remove other barriers placed on people with records.
  • "Most school shooters gave many warning signs, report says." By Stephen Sawchuck. Education Week, November 13, 2019, pp. 1, 13.
    Summarizes a study conducted by the United States Secret Service National Threat Assessment Center [NATC] on incidents of school violence that occurred from 2008–2017. Highlights key findings and suggests many of the school shootings could have been prevented.
  • "Occupational licensing in Texas: How much is too much?" By Shannon Halbrook and Bruce Wright. Fiscal Notes, November 2019, pp. 1, 3-6.
    Provides an overview of occupational licensing in the United States and discusses increasing concerns over the restrictions of extensive occupational licensing in Texas, including economic costs and labor market consequences. Summarizes recent legislation to deregulate and simplify occupational licensing: SB2065, 85th Legislature, R.S., and SB37 and HB1342, 86th Legislature.
  • "Open government data: The economic benefits of transparency." By Jackie Benton. Fiscal Notes, November 2019, pp. 7-10.
    Looks at the history of the concept of government transparency and the importance of publicly available government data.
  • "Frequent emergency department users: Focusing solely on medical utilization misses the whole person." By Hemal K. Kanzaria, et al. Health Affairs, November 2019, pp. 1866-1875.
    Integrates medical, behavioral health, and social services data to study the wide-ranging needs of frequent emergency department [ED] users. Argues that policy makers should prioritize improvements in data sharing across sectors to avoid duplicative efforts and provide coordinated, more efficient care.
  • "Access to care: Addressing Texas’ physician-to-population ratio." By Rachel Cross. Internet Resource, September/October 2019, pp. 1-2.
    Probes the problem of the Texas physician shortage from the viewpoint of hospital administrators. Notes recent legislation supporting physician education and training.
  • "Energy security and the energy transition: A classic framework for a new challenge." By Mark Finley. Issue Brief (Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy), November 25, 2019, pp. 1-10.
    Suggests the framework used to assess energy security and mitigate risks to oil supplies can be relevant for assessing the vulnerabilities and risks of alternative energy forms in an evolving energy system.
  • "Colorado End-of-Life Options Act: A clash of organizational and individual conscience." By Matthew Wynia. JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), November 26, 2019, pp. 1953-1954.
    Presents the 2016 Colorado End-of-Life Options Act as a case study on aid-in-dying legislation at the state level.
  • "The American K-12 decline." By Chester E. Finn, Jr. National Review, November 25, 2019, pp. 44-46.
    Considers current problems with the United States K-12 education system and argues that school choice and tinkering with standards and testing are not enough. Recommends giving students clear incentives and expectations for achievement.
  • "GAO: Government could get higher returns from offshore oil, gas leasing." By Nick Snow. Oil and Gas Journal, November 4, 2019, pp. 26-27.
    Summarizes a report from the Government Accountability Office [GAO] that addresses offshore oil and gas leasing.
  • "What is a 'well regulated militia,' anyway?" By Brian Doherty. Reason, December 2019, pp. 39-41.
    Discusses the two clauses comprising the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution and explains them in a historical context and as interpreted by various United States Supreme Court cases.
  • "GPS down." By Paul Tullis. Scientific American, December 2019, pp. 38-45.
    Discusses the vulnerability of systems that rely on GPS [Global Positioning System] to hacking and spoofing attacks. Explains the United States has no backups in place if GPS is compromised.
  • "On shaky ground." By Douglas Shinkle, et al. State Legislatures, November/December 2019, pp. 10-19.
    Presents a series of articles on state policies to improve infrastructure in transportation, energy transmission facilities, water and wastewater plants, and disaster-related mitigation.
  • "More kids on Medicaid to get health care in school." By Michael Ollove. Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), November 27, 2019, pp. 1-5.
    Reports more than a dozen states are taking advantage of a five-year-old federal policy change that allows public schools to bill Medicaid for health services provided to children enrolled in Medicaid.
  • "Regulatory impediments disproportionately affect voting rights in communities of color in Texas, Mississippi, and Louisiana." By Reginal D. Harris and Brian M. King. Thurgood Marshall Law Review, Spring 2019, pp. 611-646 (Note Length).
    Examines the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and how subsequent amendments and court precedents have affected the original legislation, including Shelby County v. Holder, which effectively ended preclearance. Surveys the impact of laws within Texas, Mississippi, and Louisiana, on minority voters. Includes discussion of online voter registration, voter ID laws (SB14, 82nd Legislature, R.S. and SB5, 85th Legislature, R.S.), the disenfranchisement of felons, and the availability of polling locations.

The Legislative Reference Library compiles this weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. Professional librarians review and select articles from more than 300 periodicals, including public policy journals, specialized industry periodicals, news magazines, and state agency publications. Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles using our online form.

Interim Hearings – Week of December 9

Today's Committee Meetings on the LRL website is a calendar of interim committee hearings with links to agendas. Below are resources related to upcoming Interim Hearings.

 

For recent posts on Interim Hearings, see Interim Hearing Resources on the LRL homepage. The "Recent Entries" list on the left provides quick access to interim hearings posts from previous weeks.

 

December 10

Topic: The State Water Implementation Fund for Texas (SWIFT) Advisory Committee advises the Texas Water Development Board on the administration of SWIFT funds. This committee will review the overall operation, function, and structure of the fund at least semi-annually and advises the board on any water related matter.

Topic: The Texas Infrastructure Resiliency Fund Advisory Committee (TIRF) will meet at 2:15 p.m. or upon recess/adjournment of the State Water Implementation Fund for Texas Advisory Committee (SWIFT). The advisory committee shall review the overall operation, function, and structure of the resiliency fund at least semiannually and may provide comments and recommendations to the board on any matter.

 

December 13

House Committee on Redistricting (Edinburg) 

Topic: 2021 legislative redistricting process and 2020 Census data

 

December 14

House Committee on Redistricting (Harlingen) 

Topic: 2021 legislative redistricting process and 2020 Census data