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Current Articles & Research Resources, June 17

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Review hurricane safety tips. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, June 1, 2021)
  • See which industries did not experience declines during the COVID-19 pandemic. (U.S. Census Bureau, June 8, 2021)
  • Explore various aspects of the Texas economy. (Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, May 26, 2021)
  • Read a detailed FAQ about Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds. (U.S. Department of the Treasury, June 10, 2021)
  • Follow the progress of S.475, which was signed by the president, making Juneteenth a federal holiday. (Congress.gov, accessed June 16, 2021)

 

Librarians review and select articles from more than 1,000 print and online sources to compile a weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. View this week's Current Articles.

 

Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles by using our online form or by calling 512-463-1252.

New & Noteworthy Books and Reports: June 2021

The Library is continually adding new books to its collection. Below are the titles from our June 2021 New & Noteworthy list.

Check out and delivery of New & Noteworthy titles is available to legislative staff in Capitol and District offices. To arrange check out and delivery of any of these items, you can submit an online request through the New & Noteworthy page on our website, contact the library at 512-463-1252, or use our PDF request form.

 

1. Fortunate Son: Selected Essays from the Lone Star State
By Rick Bass
Explores the meaning of being a "Texan" through literary essays. Chronicles historical state events through the author's memories and musings on nature, music, football, religion, geology, and the passage of time. Scrutinizes the ever-changing culture of the Lone Star State, with stories stretching from Galveston Bay to Wichita Falls and featuring characters such as Roy Bedichek and James McMurtry, musician and son of writer Larry McMurtry.
High Road Books, 2021, 189 pages
976.4063 B317F 2021

 

 

2. From a Taller Tower: The Rise of the American Mass Shooter
By Seamus McGraw
Chronicles the rise of mass shootings, beginning in 1966 on the campus of the University of Texas. Explores the backgrounds of the perpetrators, as well as the experiences of gun violence survivors, first responders, and mental health experts. Challenges the notion of a "good guy with a gun" and the cultural idolization of guns.
University of Texas Press, 2021, 240 pages
364.152 M487 2021

 

 

3. On Juneteenth
By Annette Gordon-Reed
Provides a series of short essays on the history of Juneteenth, a holiday marking the end of slavery in Texas, and how African Americans have played a crucial role in Texas history. Examines the author's own recollections and her family history to discuss the complexities of the Black experience in Texas.
Liveright Publishing, 2021, 148 pages
394.263 G662J 2021

 

 

4. A Single Star and Bloody Knuckles: A History of Politics and Race in Texas
By Bill Minutaglio
Recounts a history of Texas politics from the June 19 ("Juneteenth") order announcing the emancipation of slaves in Texas in 1865 to the 2020 election, with an eye to how race and racism have shaped the institutions and mythology of the state. Profiles both well-known and forgotten figures in Texas political history, such as Barbara Jordan, George W. Bush, labor activist Emma Tenayuca, and Reconstruction Governor Edmund Davis.
University of Texas Press, 2021, 376 pages
976.406 M668 2021

 

 

5. The Texas Triangle: An Emerging Power in the Global Economy
By Henry G. Cisneros, David Hendricks, J. H. Cullum Clark, and William Fulton
Studies the Texas Triangle, the interconnected urban economy consisting of three metropolitan complexes – Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston-Galveston, and Austin-San Antonio. Explains the origin of the Texas Triangle, its importance to Texas, how it compares to other economies, and its potential to become one of the most economically powerful regions in the world. Points out that the political structure that fueled the state's success during the past sixty years now has the potential to undermine the state's and the Texas Triangle's continued growth and future success.
Texas A&M University Press, 2021, 335 pages
330.9764 C579 2021

 

 

6. The Eyes of Texans: From Slavery to the Texas Capitol: Personal Stories from Six Generations of One Family
By Melvin Edwards
Retells the stories of six generations of the author's family, spanning from Edwards' first enslaved ancestor in Texas to his role as speechwriter for former Texas Governor Rick Perry. Features firsthand accounts detailing their lives, while delivering a glimpse into Texas history. Provides insight into the discrimination and harassment endured by African Americans along with their achievements.
Independently published, 2020, 159 pages
929.20973 ED26E 2020

 

 

7. Juneteenth Texas: Essays in African-American Folklore
Presents a wide variety of viewpoints on African American folklore in Texas, including personal memoirs, scholarly articles, and essays describing African American folk culture, songs, and stories. Includes an essay on the history of the Juneteenth celebration in Texas, highlighting the path to establishing it as an official state holiday with the passage of HB 1016, 66th Legislature.
University of North Texas Press, 1996, 364 pages
398 AB37 1996

 

Bill Statistics, Two Weeks After Sine Die, June 15

June 20 is the last day the governor can sign or veto an enrolled bill. If neither action is taken, the bill becomes law without his signature.

To see how these bill statistics have changed and other post-session information, see our previous blog posts on the legislative process.

 

 

 

87th Legislature Statistics

The following bill statistics were calculated on June 15 at 9:10 a.m.

 

House Bills (HBs) & Senate Bills (SBs)
Filed 6,927
Sent to the Governor 1,073
Signed by the Governor 589
Filed without the Governor's signature 34
Vetoed by the Governor 1
House Joint Resolutions (HJRs) & Senate Joint Resolutions (SJRs)
Filed 221
Filed with the Secretary of State 8
House Concurrent Resolutions (HCRs) & Senate Concurrent Resolutions (SCRs)
Filed 179
Filed with the Secretary of State 14
Sent to the Governor 86
Signed by the Governor 64
Vetoed by the Governor 0

Current Articles & Research Resources, June 10

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

 

Librarians review and select articles from more than 1,000 print and online sources to compile a weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. View this week's Current Articles.

 

Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles by using our online form or by calling 512-463-1252.

Updated Bill Statistics, June 8

June 20 is the last day the governor can sign or veto an enrolled bill. If neither action is taken, the bill becomes law without his signature.

To see how these bill statistics have changed and other post-session information, see our previous blog posts on the legislative process.

 

87th Legislature Statistics

The following bill statistics were calculated on June 8 at 12:20 p.m.

 

House Bills (HBs) & Senate Bills (SBs)
Filed 6,927
Sent to the Governor 1,072
Signed by the Governor 404
Filed without the Governor's signature 19
Vetoed by the Governor 1
House Joint Resolutions (HJRs) & Senate Joint Resolutions (SJRs)
Filed 221
Filed with the Secretary of State 8
House Concurrent Resolutions (HCRs) & Senate Concurrent Resolutions (SCRs)
Filed 179
Filed with the Secretary of State 14
Sent to the Governor 86
Signed by the Governor 53
Filed without the Governor's signature 0
Vetoed by the Governor 0

 

Current Articles & Research Resources, June 3

In this weekly post, we feature helpful research tools and recent articles of interest to the legislative community.

  • Find session law chapters by bill number for the 87th Legislature. (Texas Secretary of State, accessed June 2, 2021)
  • Read about nature tourism in Texas. (Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, May 2021)
  • Review voter identification requirements by state. (National Conference of State Legislatures, May 21, 2021)
  • Consider how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting equal opportunity employment laws. (U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, updated May 28, 2021)

 

Librarians review and select articles from more than 1,000 print and online sources to compile a weekly annotated list of Current Articles of interest to the legislative community. View this week's Current Articles.

 

Members of the Texas legislative community may request articles by using our online form or by calling 512-463-1252.

What's Next? Post-Session FAQ and Bill Statistics

Bill Statistics:

House Bills (HBs) & Senate Bills (SBs)
Filed 6,927
Sent to the Governor 1,070
Signed by the Governor 182
Filed without the Governor's signature 14
Vetoed by the Governor 1
House Joint Resolutions (HJRs) & Senate Joint Resolutions (SJRs)
Filed 221
Filed with the Secretary of State 8
House Concurrent Resolutions (HCRs) & Senate Concurrent Resolutions (SCRs)
Filed 179
Filed with the Secretary of State 14
Sent to the Governor 86
Signed by the Governor 49
Filed without the Governor's signature 0
Vetoed by the Governor 0

*Statistics as of June 2, 2021, at 1 p.m. See our bill statistics page to compare these numbers with historical statistics.

 

Post-Session FAQ:

What happens now?

The 87th Regular Session ended May 31, 2021. Bills that pass both the House and the Senate are sent to the governor to sign, veto, or allow to become law without his signature.

 

When the Legislature passes a bill, does it become a law right away?

No. Under Article 4, Section 14 of the Texas Constitution, bills passed by the Legislature must be submitted to the governor for approval. The governor can sign a bill, veto it, line-item veto an appropriation, or allow a bill to become law without his signature.

 

How much time does the governor have to act on a bill?

The deadline for the governor to act on a bill is contingent upon the point in time in which the bill is presented to the governor.


If a bill is sent to the governor during the legislative session, the governor has 10 days (excluding Sundays) to sign the bill or return the bill to the Legislature with objection. If after 10 days the bill is not returned to the Legislature by the governor with objections or he has not yet signed it, the bill becomes law as if the governor had signed it.


If the Legislature has adjourned sine die, or if the bill is presented to the governor less than 10 days (excluding Sundays) prior to final adjournment, the governor has 20 days (including Sundays) after the final day of the session to sign or veto the bill. If neither action is taken, the bill becomes law without the governor's signature (Texas Const. art. IV, § 14).


Sunday, June 20, is the 20th day following the final adjournment of the 87th Regular Session. It is the last day the governor can sign or veto bills passed during the 87th Regular Session. The LRL's vetoes database will be updated for the 87th Regular Session as we receive those documents.

 

If the governor approves a bill, when will it take effect?

The text of a bill may include effective date provisions requiring the bill to take effect immediately, to take effect on a specified day, or there may be no mention of an effective date. Different sections of a bill may have different effective dates.


According to Article III, Section 39 of the Texas Constitution, a bill cannot become effective until at least 90 days after the session ends unless the bill passes both chambers with a favorable vote by two-thirds of the members.


Monday, August 30, 2021 is the 91st day following final adjournment; bills that do not specify an effective date and those that did not have the two-thirds vote necessary to take effect earlier will take effect on Monday, August 30, 2021.


If a bill received the votes necessary to become effective immediately, it will take effect on the date of the last action necessary for it to become law. This could be when the governor signs it, when the governor files it with the Secretary of State without approving or vetoing it, or when the time for the governor to act expires, if the bill has not been approved or vetoed during that time.

 

What happens to bills that do not pass?

Bills that do not make it completely through the legislative process die with the end of the session and are not automatically refiled during the next session.

 

What about other types of legislation?

Joint resolutions that pass both chambers of the Legislature are filed with the Secretary of State, and will be on the ballot as a proposed constitutional amendment for the November 2, 2021 election.


Concurrent resolutions generally require action by the governor. Concurrent resolutions used for administrative matters in the House and Senate do not require approval from the governor.


Simple resolutions are passed by only one chamber of the Legislature, and do not require the governor's approval.

 

Where can I find more information about special sessions?

You can start with the LRL's FAQ about special sessions. The LRL website's section devoted to special sessions also includes historical information, links to statutory authority pertaining to special sessions, and more.

 

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